Why is chemistry more important than bio when studying medicine

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efefeffe
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and vice versa ... thanks
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Lilli22
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even if you know the layout of a heart and the lungs by memory, i would prefer a doctor who knows that cyanide is not a great vaccine.

in all fairness idk but i would think it's to do with the chemicals.
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gradeguesser
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i have no idea. But for example first year dentistry is apparently most of a-level biology and many have no idea why chemistry is the one needed. Of course there’ll be chemistry content but not as much as biology! Maybe it’s because chemistry can be seen as a more challenging course (don’t ask me how/why) so they’re seeing if you can handle that high level of study.
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Pigster
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It is a harder subject.
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EierVonSatan
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It's not to do with utility, it's a selection mechanism.
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kekedoyouloveme?
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(Original post by Lilligant22)
even if you know the layout of a heart and the lungs by memory, i would prefer a doctor who knows that cyanide is not a great vaccine.

in all fairness idk but i would think it's to do with the chemicals.
lmao we learn cyanide in biology as a respiratory inhibitor, but i get what you're saying chemistry is a lot in like clinical aspects
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Democracy
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(Original post by efefeffe)
and vice versa ... thanks
It's just an entry requirement - there isn't any pure chemistry in the degree or on the job.
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Doones
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I've linked this across to the Medicine forum.

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meddad
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(Original post by efefeffe)
and vice versa ... thanks
It demonstrates a learning style which it's considered lends itself to studying a medical degree ie: learning large volumes of information you'll never use again. May be?
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Blue Peanut Medical Education
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I think if you look at the first 2 years curriculum of medical schools it is filled with subjects such as pharmacology and biochemistry in which you will apply and build on what you have learnt in A-level chemistry. In addition as you go through the years you will apply this knowledge in clinical practice. The concepts are too fundamental to make optional and this would be my educated guess at why A-level chemistry is compulsory.

Blue Peanut Medical Education
https://www.bluepeanut.co.uk
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GANFYD
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Because results in A level Chemistry are the strongest positive predicting factor of those who will do well at med school. UKCAT shows some linking to success in the first two years, and recent research tends to suggest that might carry forwards. As stated, it is a selection mechanism. The course is actually far closer to human biology and you could learn either as you went through the course if you were committed enough (as demonstrated by the fact neither are requirements for every med school in the country)
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