Are we left out alone at university? And more. Watch

nassibou
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Hello,
I wondered in the first place if we are left out alone through out the days. I mean, do we get to know the teachers and vice versa? Can we get help from the teachers? How does a lecture look like? Are there outlets for computers in the lectures rooms?
Thanks
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username1230881
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(Original post by nassibou)
Hello,
I wondered in the first place if we are left out alone through out the days. I mean, do we get to know the teachers and vice versa? Can we get help from the teachers? How does a lecture look like? Are there outlets for computers in the lectures rooms?
Thanks
University is very much about independent study so it's rather different to school, but you're not 'left out alone', don't worry! For many courses, teaching will be through lectures and seminars. Lectures are generally just an hour or two of listening and making notes; you won't typically get to know the lecturer unless you go to their office hour. Seminars are a bit different as they're group discussions and tasks with a seminar tutor (who may or may not be the same person as the lecturer). You'll get to know them a bit more, but in many cases seminar tutors change each term so it's still not the same as a teacher in school. But again, if you need support, you can go to their office hour.

However, there's one person that you'll more likely get to know - you'll be allocated an academic supervisor, generally the same person for all three or four years. You'll probably meet them every term or so to discuss your progress, and they can offer support and will write your references etc. It's definitely not the same as a teacher-student relationship from school, but they'll probably be the only constant figure across your entire university life, because lecturers/tutors will vary depending on different modules.

There's exceptions of course - I had the same seminar tutor for one module throughout my entire second year and we got along really well, and after going to office hours I know some of the lecturers - but generally your supervisor is the one constant person. But if you need help, that's easy to access, by asking in a seminar, asking at the end of a lecture (if there's time), going to an office hour, or just sending an email. The help you get might be a bit different to school - they're unlikely to be able to read your essay before it's due and help you improve it because it's independent work - but they'll provide support.

As for outlets - it varies. There's outlets in the modern lecture rooms at my university but the older and smaller rooms don't have outlets, and modules get more specialised and smaller across the years so I haven't had lecture outlets access in a while. Often it's just chairs-with-desks set out in the middle of a room - so it's worth investing in a laptop with good battery life. Seminar rooms generally do have outlets but not necessarily too accessible.
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nassibou
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(Original post by doctorwhofan98)
University is very much about independent study so it's rather different to school, but you're not 'left out alone', don't worry! For many courses, teaching will be through lectures and seminars. Lectures are generally just an hour or two of listening and making notes; you won't typically get to know the lecturer unless you go to their office hour. Seminars are a bit different as they're group discussions and tasks with a seminar tutor (who may or may not be the same person as the lecturer). You'll get to know them a bit more, but in many cases seminar tutors change each term so it's still not the same as a teacher in school. But again, if you need support, you can go to their office hour.

However, there's one person that you'll more likely get to know - you'll be allocated an academic supervisor, generally the same person for all three or four years. You'll probably meet them every term or so to discuss your progress, and they can offer support and will write your references etc. It's definitely not the same as a teacher-student relationship from school, but they'll probably be the only constant figure across your entire university life, because lecturers/tutors will vary depending on different modules.

There's exceptions of course - I had the same seminar tutor for one module throughout my entire second year and we got along really well, and after going to office hours I know some of the lecturers - but generally your supervisor is the one constant person. But if you need help, that's easy to access, by asking in a seminar, asking at the end of a lecture (if there's time), going to an office hour, or just sending an email. The help you get might be a bit different to school - they're unlikely to be able to read your essay before it's due and help you improve it because it's independent work - but they'll provide support.

As for outlets - it varies. There's outlets in the modern lecture rooms at my university but the older and smaller rooms don't have outlets, and modules get more specialised and smaller across the years so I haven't had lecture outlets access in a while. Often it's just chairs-with-desks set out in the middle of a room - so it's worth investing in a laptop with good battery life. Seminar rooms generally do have outlets but not necessarily too accessible.
Thank you a lot. Your answer helped me clarifying my worries. Now I have a better conception of what university looks like
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nassibou
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(Original post by doctorwhofan98)
University is very much about independent study so it's rather different to school, but you're not 'left out alone', don't worry! For many courses, teaching will be through lectures and seminars. Lectures are generally just an hour or two of listening and making notes; you won't typically get to know the lecturer unless you go to their office hour. Seminars are a bit different as they're group discussions and tasks with a seminar tutor (who may or may not be the same person as the lecturer). You'll get to know them a bit more, but in many cases seminar tutors change each term so it's still not the same as a teacher in school. But again, if you need support, you can go to their office hour.

However, there's one person that you'll more likely get to know - you'll be allocated an academic supervisor, generally the same person for all three or four years. You'll probably meet them every term or so to discuss your progress, and they can offer support and will write your references etc. It's definitely not the same as a teacher-student relationship from school, but they'll probably be the only constant figure across your entire university life, because lecturers/tutors will vary depending on different modules.

There's exceptions of course - I had the same seminar tutor for one module throughout my entire second year and we got along really well, and after going to office hours I know some of the lecturers - but generally your supervisor is the one constant person. But if you need help, that's easy to access, by asking in a seminar, asking at the end of a lecture (if there's time), going to an office hour, or just sending an email. The help you get might be a bit different to school - they're unlikely to be able to read your essay before it's due and help you improve it because it's independent work - but they'll provide support.

As for outlets - it varies. There's outlets in the modern lecture rooms at my university but the older and smaller rooms don't have outlets, and modules get more specialised and smaller across the years so I haven't had lecture outlets access in a while. Often it's just chairs-with-desks set out in the middle of a room - so it's worth investing in a laptop with good battery life. Seminar rooms generally do have outlets but not necessarily too accessible.
If I have asked about outlets it is because my computer battery life sucks. So I will follow your advice and invest in a good laptop with a good battery life, thanks again!
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username1230881
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(Original post by nassibou)
If I have asked about outlets it is because my computer battery life sucks. So I will follow your advice and invest in a good laptop with a good battery life, thanks again!
The alternative is making notes on paper, which a lot of people do and cope well with. There are definitely advantages to using a laptop but it isn't completely necessary.
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