Tess Holliday covers Cosmo to send "important body positivity message"

Watch
Danny Dorito
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Plus-size model Tess Holliday graces the cover of Cosmo's September issue, to send an important message of body positivity. The model start the campaign #effyourbeautystandards in response to online trolls.

You can read more on the story here

I think she look incredible!

What do you make of this? Should there be more diversity in magazines? Would you like to see a male cover like this?
2
reply
Eunomia
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
She is beautiful but morbid obesity should not be encouraged. Why can't the fashion industry promote healthy body types instead of the extreme ends of both spectrums?
3
reply
Caledonite
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
My god she looks terrible (but she does have an abnormally pretty face for someone so large). Morbid obesity is not attractive.
2
reply
the beer
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
How is this an improvement on heroin chic?
0
reply
username2835430
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
Morbid obesity isn't something to promote. I smoke, but if I saw a model smoking on a magazine I'd be outraged as it sets a bad example and glorifies an unhealthy lifestyle just like Tess Holliday's pic glorifies being unhealthily overweight.
1
reply
fallen_acorns
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
"If I saw a body like mine on this magazine when I was a young girl, it would have changed my life"

maybe you would have seen what you were going to look like in 20 years and stopped eating.

---

Body positivity is nothing but dangerous nonsense driven by people who want to rid themselves of the guilt they feel for their own mistakes, coupled by people who are to afraid to speak harsh-truths so are happy to pretend everything is ok.
2
reply
Eunomia
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
It is one thing to accept your body while trying to live a healthier lifestyle. That kind of body positivity should be promoted, as self-hatred isn't good for one's mental health. However, that is not the same as being clearly unhealthy but claiming that your lifestyle does not require any changes.

I hear about Victoria's Secret models on extreme diets and it's disturbing. I understand why people think that such diets should not be promoted and are harmful especially to young women. However, this nation has a growing problem with obesity, and telling people that it's fine and that they should just carry on eating what they want is equally harmful.
0
reply
Occitanie
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45354696

What a load of tosh. Pathetic, self-righteous waffle.

The article, however, beautifully sums up how utter shite the ‘progressive’ movement is.
0
reply
ilem
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
It's funny how there are very few, if any at all, obese blokes complaining about how it's society's fault that their morbidly obese bodies are considered unattractive. Seems to me there are some entitlement issues at play here.
4
reply
username3895014
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
There’s definitely a difference between “plus size” and overweight to point it’s unhealthy, but I don’t think we can judge which one someone is, just by looking at a picture of them. However, Tessa is size 26. Which is obviously overweight

Edit: it’s also possible (and probably more common in teens) to be so skinny, to a point it’s unhealthy. Where self harming is so prominent nowadays, it is important to make girls feel like their (healthy) bodies are beautiful
1
reply
Act of War
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
the only thing plus sized women need is a diet
2
reply
SomMC1
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by Occitanie)
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-45354696

What a load of tosh. Pathetic, self-righteous waffle.

The article, however, beautifully sums up how utter shite the ‘progressive’ movement is.

I mean, on one hand I can agree and not mind such women on covers if it means that those young girls dont self-harm themselves or dont get depression bc of their weight, body, etc.

But at the same time, she even said in the article that she's 'fat' sooo why not change it lol? I dont get that part.

She said she isnt telling her followers to 'gain weight and be fat' but why her being fat already sends the message that it's perfectly fine to be over-weight and possibly cause health issues.
0
reply
Andrew97
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#13
Report 2 years ago
#13
Less pies?
0
reply
MrDystopia
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#14
Report 2 years ago
#14
If the idea is that we should be encouraging people to be happy for who they are, rather than trying to aspire to be what social media or the fashion industry says, then we do need more diversity in the sizes of models used. And that means covering all size ranges, those skin, large, in between. It's only through continued usage that we'll eventually reach a point when a model's size won't matter.

That said, I can see the arguments for potentially glamorising unhealthy body weights. Ultimately I think what models are used in the fashion industry, someone is going to be upset.
0
reply
random_matt
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 2 years ago
#15
So it's ok to shame skinny models, but being obese is fine? Disgusting and should not be telling young girls it's ok to be fat, unless you want CVD in your early teens.
0
reply
monkeyman0121
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#16
Report 2 years ago
#16
Absolute crap. I mean this is encouraging people to be fine being overweight and at risk of developing conditions which lead to an earlier death. I mean I am overweight quite considerably and I know that my body is not healthy, I am losing weight and if I read something like this and was really naive and believed that my body is good then I would not be where I am today. I mean really how stupid do you have to be to say that your body is ok when you are severely overweight and at risk.
0
reply
Just a willow
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#17
Report 2 years ago
#17
As someone who is by no means skinny, I think that models like Tess Holliday exploit the whole 'progressive body positivity' movement as they gain jobs purely because of their size. In this sense, she is profiting on the media's aims to seem progressive by promoting extremes.

Instead we should be promoting the idea that the average, healthy body can be beautiful. It is models like this that forge a divide between fat shamers and the pretensiously virtuous progressives. From my experience, fat shaming only leads to comfort eating, people become destructive when upset. Fat shamers should learn some basic psychology. Disregarding obesity only leads to health problems. Progressives should learn some basic biology.
1
reply
SHallowvale
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#18
Report 2 years ago
#18
(Original post by MrDystopia)
If the idea is that we should be encouraging people to be happy for who they are, rather than trying to aspire to be what social media or the fashion industry says, then we do need more diversity in the sizes of models used. And that means covering all size ranges, those skin, large, in between. It's only through continued usage that we'll eventually reach a point when a model's size won't matter.

That said, I can see the arguments for potentially glamorising unhealthy body weights. Ultimately I think what models are used in the fashion industry, someone is going to be upset.
Not putting yourself down for being fat seems to be the message behind this. As in, 'Don't consider yourself ugly and worthless because you're fat'.

This isn't the same thing as promoting unhealthy bodies/diets but I can see how someone can get that impression.

Ideally I think body positivity and healthy lifestyles should be encouraged in unison.
1
reply
Viva Emptiness
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#19
Report 2 years ago
#19
If I had seen bodies like this in the media framed in a positive light, and my parents had done too, there is no way I would have been raised with the disordered view of food and my body that I have now.

It's not about encouraging people to be fat, no one looking at this has gone "wow, I want to be like that", but body diversity encourages fewer people to hate themselves for who they are and allows them to approach their diet and lifestyle from a more balanced perspective with less pressure.
4
reply
thegg560
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#20
Report 2 years ago
#20
I had watched this on the news this morning when they were interviewing Tess. I really don't agree with this. It continues to baffle me. While having "skinny/slim" models on magazine covers or being continuously promoted by the media may promote eating disorders and/or self esteem issues, having this overweight woman is NOT the answer. This just promotes complacency.
There needs to be a middle ground; an average body, some stretch marks here and there? That is one of the bodies that I can get behind. But you cannot go from one extreme to the other and call it "body positivity."
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you travelling in the Uni student travel window (3-9 Dec) to go home for Christmas?

Yes (17)
35.42%
No - I have already returned home (7)
14.58%
No - I plan on travelling outside these dates (8)
16.67%
No - I'm staying at my term time address over Christmas (2)
4.17%
No - I live at home during term anyway (14)
29.17%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed