Government proposes energy drinks ban for children Watch

Poll: Do you think energy drinks should be banned?
Yes (641)
35.16%
No (1182)
64.84%
MrDystopia
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The sale of energy drinks could be banned in England to anybody under 18, amid fears they are damaging children's health, the prime minister has said.

The government has launched a public consultation on its plans to make it illegal to sell the drinks to children.

Energy drinks contain high levels of sugar and caffeine and have been linked to obesity and other health issues.

The government is asking for views on what age the ban should apply to, but gave under 16 and under 18 as options.

Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales have the power to implement their own bans.

UK youngsters are among the highest consumers of energy drinks in Europe, research has previously suggested.

The drinks contain high levels of caffeine and sugar, often much more than those of standard soft drinks.

Excessive consumption has been linked to a range of health issues in children, from obesity, tooth decay, headaches and sleep problems to stomach aches and hyperactivity. Surveys from teachers unions have also suggested that they contribute to poor behaviour in classrooms, although claims they can alter behaviour have been contested.

The ban would apply to drinks containing 150mg of caffeine or more per litre.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-45342682

So, are you in favour or against such a policy being implemented. Do the health concerns mean these products shouldn't be available to our youth, or do you think that this is an example of the state interfering when it shouldn't?
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username3934898
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Under 16s shouldn't have access to energy drinks.

I mostly see year 8s and 9s drinking red bull. I mean there is a convenience store near my school and I regularly see people in my school buying energy drinks. On the rare occasion I even see parents giving young kids energy drinks and I honestly don't know why.

I personally don't think it should be under 18s. I'm more concerned about children becoming addicted to these drinks than 16 year olds who can make that decision for themselves.
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Zoe Pell
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#3
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I think it will be disgusting if they ban it, another example of tory britain trying to dictate to us, vote them out
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DeadmouseArtist
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#4
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The nanny state strikes again...
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mercedesamber
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#5
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#5
I personally don't think kids SHOULD be drinking them, but I don't agree with it being banned. (It's also really annoying when I go into a supermarket to buy a multipack of Monster and the 'age check verification' comes up and I have to wait for someone to say 'yup you're old enough for an energy drink'--- first world problem, I know.)
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username1751857
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#6
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Are we forgetting that what a child consumes is the responsibility of their parents not the government?
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londonmyst
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I think energy drinks need to be age restricted but not sure if 18 is the right age.

I've seen children under 7 at the hospital after allergic reactions or drinking too many cans of this stuff.
No parents ever around to talk to the doctors when the children are ill; childminders, teachers, dinner ladies, older siblings, neighbours but never any parents.
Daft parents bulk buy the drinks, sometimes pack them in lunchboxes and allow their children to consume them.
But won't face the music or hospital staff when the children need medical attention.
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the beer
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I can't see any good reason to allow children easy access to drugs.

(Original post by CoffeeGeek)
Are we forgetting that what a child consumes is the responsibility of their parents not the government?
You'd do away with age limits for alcohol, tobacco, crack and smack?
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Mikos
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#9
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I just don't see how it's going to help.
It's not exactly anything like heroin, and in terms of its properties it's honestly not too different from coffee or a sugary drink such as orange juice or lemonade.
Under 16s? Maybe. But if we can expect 16 year olds to choose subjects which essentially dictate their career path, then why can't we trust them to buy energy drinks?
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Infinite Series
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#10
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It's stupid that they're banning it, and it's even more stupid that the legal age for it will be 18!
Are they actually implying that Energy Drinks are as bad as alcohol?:facepalm:

I'm just gonna buy out my local corner shop and make a fortune selling these to Year 7s & 8s
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the beer
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(Original post by Mikos)
It's not exactly anything like heroin
But It is more deadly and addictive than cannabis.
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math42
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"Nanny state" comments are rather impotent to me. Doubtless nobody reasonable would profess that we should allow children to buy alcohol, and many wouldn't agree with selling drugs like cocaine and heroin even to consenting adults, so most people must admit that some state control on what its citizens put into their own bodies is reasonable. The drinks contain ridiculous quantities of caffeine and sugar, and it is frankly disgusting that they are marketed towards susceptible children, especially as their bodies are less developed and will typically handle caffeine worse than adults can. However, I'd say that the age of 16 is more reasonable than the age of 18, considering the sorts of restrictions that we already lift at 16.
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CoolCavy
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#13
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Agree with it tbh, energy drinks are pointless - especially for children who have boundless energy as it is.
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Acsel
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#14
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Completely agree that something needs to be in place to prevent young people purchasing energy drinks.

But I think the more fundamental issue is why young people need them in the first place. Ignoring all the issues of addiction, sugar consumption, etc. it suggests there's a fairly major problem if young people need energy drinks to function. If you can't get through the day without a caffeine fix, then there's probably something wrong with you. I have nothing against someone who has a morning coffee to wake up but if you can't get through your afternoon classes without an energy drink at lunch then there's something wrong with you.
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username1221160
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(Original post by math42)
"Nanny state" comments are rather impotent to me. Doubtless nobody reasonable would profess that we should allow children to buy alcohol, and many wouldn't agree with selling drugs like cocaine and heroin even to consenting adults, so most people must admit that some state control on what its citizens put into their own bodies is reasonable. The drinks contain ridiculous quantities of caffeine and sugar, and it is frankly disgusting that they are marketed towards susceptible children, especially as their bodies are less developed and will typically handle caffeine worse than adults can. However, I'd say that the age of 16 is more reasonable than the age of 18, considering the sorts of restrictions that we already lift at 16.
Redbull contains the same amount of sugar as coke and a standard can contains the same amount of caffeine as a string cup of coffee. Those quantities aren't ridiculous. Unfortunately energy drinks have become the latest health scare with people clamouring for legislation. There doesn't exist a substantial body of research that, in and of themselves, they represent a significant health risk.
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CTLeafez
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I would support limiting access to those under 16.

Energy drinks aren't great for anyone but you'd hope those who are in Year 11+ would have the maturity to make their own decisions about their health.

I can't see any reason why under 16s would require energy drinks. If they are tired and can't function without caffeine, their parents need to provide them with a proper breakfast and a decent amount of sleep.
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SomMC1
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(Original post by MrDystopia)
The sale of energy drinks could be banned in England to anybody under 18, amid fears they are damaging children's health, the prime minister has said.

The government has launched a public consultation on its plans to make it illegal to sell the drinks to children.

Energy drinks contain high levels of sugar and caffeine and have been linked to obesity and other health issues.

The government is asking for views on what age the ban should apply to, but gave under 16 and under 18 as options.

Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales have the power to implement their own bans.

UK youngsters are among the highest consumers of energy drinks in Europe, research has previously suggested.

The drinks contain high levels of caffeine and sugar, often much more than those of standard soft drinks.

Excessive consumption has been linked to a range of health issues in children, from obesity, tooth decay, headaches and sleep problems to stomach aches and hyperactivity. Surveys from teachers unions have also suggested that they contribute to poor behaviour in classrooms, although claims they can alter behaviour have been contested.

The ban would apply to drinks containing 150mg of caffeine or more per litre.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-45342682

So, are you in favour or against such a policy being implemented. Do the health concerns mean these products shouldn't be available to our youth, or do you think that this is an example of the state interfering when it shouldn't?
Isnt Sainsbury already asking for ID before selling energy drinks in the UK? Or it might be another shopping market.. (maybe Morrisons)
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londonmyst
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I didn't know the UK had an age limit for crack.

(Original post by the beer)
I can't see any good reason to allow children easy access to drugs.



You'd do away with age limits for alcohol, tobacco, crack and smack?
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joey11223
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#19
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Health issues such as obesity, tooth decay, headaches, hyperactivity etc....so I assume we're just going to ban most fizzy drinks pretty soon? Then coffee for under 16's.
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Ol94
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yeah under 16s shouldnt be drinking that chit. whether to ban them probably a step too far. ban 12 y/o and younger yes. but how would that work then 13 year olds need to carry a passport on them to buy it
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