username2888406
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I'll be applying to two universities to study child nursing in Sept 2019. One will be training against the new standards and the other training against the old standards.

Can anyone outline in basic terms what the differences will be between the old and new standards, pros and cons of each, and specifically in relation to child nursing?

I'd like to understand the differences better and if there are significant advantages for one over the other it might influence which uni I choose.
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Andremasil
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(Original post by SmilingWombat)
I'll be applying to two universities to study child nursing in Sept 2019. One will be training against the new standards and the other training against the old standards.

Can anyone outline in basic terms what the differences will be between the old and new standards, pros and cons of each, and specifically in relation to child nursing?

I'd like to understand the differences better and if there are significant advantages for one over the other it might influence which uni I choose.

Hi, I have been reading about it and to be honest I like the concept of the new training. have a look https://www.nmc.org.uk/news/press-re...xt-generation/
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username2888406
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@Andremasil Thanks for the link, and I agree with you that the new training has positives. I like the idea of learning more about all four fields of nursing. As a children's nurse I will come into contact with young people (and possibly their parents/carers) who are affected by mental health or learning disability, so it would be useful to have an understanding of this area too. I think mental health in particular will be very useful to learn more about especially with a reported rise in the number of young people experiencing mental health challenges.

I do have concerns about the new training though. 2019 will be the first group of students to follow the new standards and I expect, as with anything new, there might be teething problems. I'd hate for that to affect my grades or quality of learning. I can see the advantage of delaying the new programme by a year to iron out any issues that might be learnt from it. I'm also undecided whether lifting the cap on simulation hours is a good thing or not and are universities likely to make much change with this particularly in the early years of the new programme.
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moonkatt
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The 2020 standards have a much wider and relevant portfolio of clinical skills that are needed for modern nursing.
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Andremasil
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(Original post by SmilingWombat)
@Andremasil Thanks for the link, and I agree with you that the new training has positives. I like the idea of learning more about all four fields of nursing. As a children's nurse I will come into contact with young people (and possibly their parents/carers) who are affected by mental health or learning disability, so it would be useful to have an understanding of this area too. I think mental health in particular will be very useful to learn more about especially with a reported rise in the number of young people experiencing mental health challenges.

I do have concerns about the new training though. 2019 will be the first group of students to follow the new standards and I expect, as with anything new, there might be teething problems. I'd hate for that to affect my grades or quality of learning. I can see the advantage of delaying the new programme by a year to iron out any issues that might be learnt from it. I'm also undecided whether lifting the cap on simulation hours is a good thing or not and are universities likely to make much change with this particularly in the early years of the new programme.
I see what you mean, I haven't thought about this angle.. being the first group. Well, I hope you choose well.. let us know good luck!
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username2888406
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(Original post by moonkatt)
The 2020 standards have a much wider and relevant portfolio of clinical skills that are needed for modern nursing.
moonkatt, do you know what additional clinical skills will be taught compared to the old standards? I'm trying to find an example of the teaching now vs new but haven't found anything yet. If there's a big difference it will definitely influence my decision, if the difference isn't all that much then it won't be a deciding factor for me. The problem I'm having is the uni I had in mind as first choice is the one offering the old standards, the one I had in mind as second choice is offering the new standards.
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moonkatt
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(Original post by SmilingWombat)
moonkatt, do you know what additional clinical skills will be taught compared to the old standards? I'm trying to find an example of the teaching now vs new but haven't found anything yet. If there's a big difference it will definitely influence my decision, if the difference isn't all that much then it won't be a deciding factor for me. The problem I'm having is the uni I had in mind as first choice is the one offering the old standards, the one I had in mind as second choice is offering the new standards.
I’m not completely clued up on the new standards yet as I’m busy with a couple of courses at the moment, but from what I’ve read in the consultation documents recently, there’s a focus on clinical assessment skills and some practical skills such as cannulation and venepuncture, IV therapy etc, which were not included in the old standards. These are essential skills for modern nursing, particularly in the acute sector and should have been included some time ago. We’ve been lagging behind the rest of the world.
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