Takeonme44
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#1
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Hi,
I was just wondering whether or not it is possible to do a masters/conversion course in Physics from a Chemistry background. Would a 2:1 in BSc Chemistry from Southampton meet the course requirements? A lot of the universities just ask for a degree with a substantial mathematical component, and on top of the standard compulsory Chemistry modules I have taken:

-Introduction to Photonics

-Mathematical Methods for Chemistry (which includes topics such as - Complex numbers, Limits, differentiation and integration, Reaction kinetics modelling, Chemical process optimisation, Linear and non-linear least squares, Approximation techniques, Statistical analysis and manipulation of probabilities, Symbolic processing software, Numerical methods in chemistry

-Mathematical Methods for Chemistry II (which includes topics- Basic linear algebra (spaces, operators, matrices), Ordinary differential equations (uniform, non-uniform, 1st and 2nd order), Basic pharmacokinetics modelling, Integration of functions of multiple variables, Polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, Algebraic foundations of quantum theory, Basic partial differential equations, Full solution of the Schrödinger equation for the hydrogen atom, Definition and applications of Fourier transform)

-Quantum Physics


-Mathematical Methods for Scientists- (which includes: Matrix mathematics and linear systems: Properties of matrices, determinants, and inverses. Linear independence and orthogonality of vectors. Matrices and systems of ordinary differential equations. Solution of both homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear systems by Gauss elimination to Hermite form. Calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Matrix diagonalization, Fourier series: Periodic functions. Orthogonality of sines and cosines. Extension to non-periodic functions (full and half-range expansions). Complex Fourier series expansion. Convergence and Gibbs phenomenon. Introduction to Fourier transforms. Orthogonal functions. Ordinary differential equations: Definition and notation. Initial and boundary value problems. Separable and exact ODEs. Integrating factors. Constant coefficient and equidimensional ODEs. Methods of reduction of order and variation of parameters. Eigenfunction expansion
Introduction to partial differential equations:. Method of characteristic curves. Method of separation of variables. Second order PDEs.

-Atoms, Molecules and Spins: Quantum Mechanics in Chemistry and Spectroscopy

Sorry for the long read, do you think this gives me enough of a matheamtical /physics background?
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iElvendork
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#2
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You won't know until you try

As long as you can map your skill set and knowledge towards the requirements of the course, you'd have a good chance
Do you have an A level in physics? They may want that to show you have a least a bit of physics knowledge
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Takeonme44
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(Original post by iElvendork)
You won't know until you try

As long as you can map your skill set and knowledge towards the requirements of the course, you'd have a good chance
Do you have an A level in physics? They may want that to show you have a least a bit of physics knowledge
Yeah I have an alevel in physics
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happywhale
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(Original post by Takeonme44)
Hi,
I was just wondering whether or not it is possible to do a masters/conversion course in Physics from a Chemistry background. Would a 2:1 in BSc Chemistry from Southampton meet the course requirements? A lot of the universities just ask for a degree with a substantial mathematical component, and on top of the standard compulsory Chemistry modules I have taken:

-Introduction to Photonics

-Mathematical Methods for Chemistry (which includes topics such as - Complex numbers, Limits, differentiation and integration, Reaction kinetics modelling, Chemical process optimisation, Linear and non-linear least squares, Approximation techniques, Statistical analysis and manipulation of probabilities, Symbolic processing software, Numerical methods in chemistry

-Mathematical Methods for Chemistry II (which includes topics- Basic linear algebra (spaces, operators, matrices), Ordinary differential equations (uniform, non-uniform, 1st and 2nd order), Basic pharmacokinetics modelling, Integration of functions of multiple variables, Polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, Algebraic foundations of quantum theory, Basic partial differential equations, Full solution of the Schrödinger equation for the hydrogen atom, Definition and applications of Fourier transform)

-Quantum Physics


-Mathematical Methods for Scientists- (which includes: Matrix mathematics and linear systems: Properties of matrices, determinants, and inverses. Linear independence and orthogonality of vectors. Matrices and systems of ordinary differential equations. Solution of both homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear systems by Gauss elimination to Hermite form. Calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Matrix diagonalization, Fourier series: Periodic functions. Orthogonality of sines and cosines. Extension to non-periodic functions (full and half-range expansions). Complex Fourier series expansion. Convergence and Gibbs phenomenon. Introduction to Fourier transforms. Orthogonal functions. Ordinary differential equations: Definition and notation. Initial and boundary value problems. Separable and exact ODEs. Integrating factors. Constant coefficient and equidimensional ODEs. Methods of reduction of order and variation of parameters. Eigenfunction expansion
Introduction to partial differential equations:. Method of characteristic curves. Method of separation of variables. Second order PDEs.

-Atoms, Molecules and Spins: Quantum Mechanics in Chemistry and Spectroscopy

Sorry for the long read, do you think this gives me enough of a matheamtical /physics background?
Hey, I'm aware this doesn't answer all your questions but just as you haven't got many answers: the maths you've covered from what you've written seems roughly equivalent to the first 1.5ish years of a physics degree (in my experience) so, purely based on that alone, I'd say it's worth a try What area of physics are you looking at? If it's applied physics, I'd reckon you have more of a chance - leaning towards the theoretical side of things you may struggle though.
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Takeonme44
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(Original post by happywhale)
Hey, I'm aware this doesn't answer all your questions but just as you haven't got many answers: the maths you've covered from what you've written seems roughly equivalent to the first 1.5ish years of a physics degree (in my experience) so, purely based on that alone, I'd say it's worth a try What area of physics are you looking at? If it's applied physics, I'd reckon you have more of a chance - leaning towards the theoretical side of things you may struggle though.
I would love to work in astrophysics or gravitational waves (although that might be too theoretical)
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