Chemistry transition work

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LunaRóse
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#1
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I have this transition work to do before I start collage I'm working in a chemistry question.

Calculate the minimum volume of hydrogen required to completely convert
1000 dm3 of nitrogen into ammonia.

I don't just want an answer can someone go through it so I understand it.
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have
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#2
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#2
(Original post by LunaRóse)
I have this transition work to do before I start collage I'm working in a chemistry question.

Calculate the minimum volume of hydrogen required to completely convert
1000 dm3 of nitrogen into ammonia.

I don't just want an answer can someone go through it so I understand it.
Write out the equation for turning nitrogen into ammonia (Haber process was on my GCSE spec, it's probably on yours too)
Figure out how many moles 1000dm^3 of Nitrogen (a gas) is. (Think molar volume of a gas)
Thus figure out how many moles of Hydrogen you need, using the equation.
And then convert that many moles of Hydrogen (also a gas) into a volume (Again using the molar volume of a gas)
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username3982936
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#3
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#3
(Original post by LunaRóse)
I have this transition work to do before I start collage I'm working in a chemistry question.

Calculate the minimum volume of hydrogen required to completely convert
1000 dm3 of nitrogen into ammonia.

I don't just want an answer can someone go through it so I understand it.
Please don't take my word for absolute answer but I think the method for this question would be...
1) calculate the moles of hydrogen required for the reaction (drawing out a balanced chemical equation may help)
2) use the molar gas volume equation to calculate the volume of hydrogen required
e.g. n(number of moles of hydrogen)=V/24 (24 is the molar gas volume). Then rearrange this equation for V..... V=24n
Then slot in the number of moles, put it into the calculator and then you should be there
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LunaRóse
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#4
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I never did the harbour process. And I can't find it in any of my texbooks
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charco
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(Original post by LunaRóse)
I never did the harbour process. And I can't find it in any of my texbooks
You won't - unless you have a textbook about fishing or shipbuilding.

However, the Haber process is in 99% of all books or ... (shocking idea) the internet.
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LunaRóse
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#6
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(Original post by charco)
You won't - unless you have a textbook about fishing or shipbuilding.

However, the Haber process is in 99% of all books or ... (shocking idea) the internet.
No need to be rude. Haber was autocorrected to harbour. And my books didn't contain it. I got I right using the other person's method any way.
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