Presto
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#1
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I know that energy released in forming new bonds makes up for energy used in breaking old bonds but I find it hard to understand and visualise this. Doesn't bond breaking occur before bond making so how is this possible and why does this happen? Can someone pls explain this?
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haseebj49
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To some extent, all reactions are endothermic to begin with. To break the bonds, energy is required; called the activation energy. After that, when bonds are being formed, energy is released and the rest of the reaction is exothermic. The net result is an exothermic reaction which can be shown by this diagram.
(The red arrow is the activation energy and the green represents the overall energy change in the reaction.)
Image
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Presto
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(Original post by haseeb_jarral)
To some extent, all reactions are endothermic to begin with. To break the bonds, energy is required; called the activation energy. After that, when bonds are being formed, energy is released and the rest of the reaction is exothermic. The net result is an exothermic reaction which can be shown by this diagram.
(The red arrow is the activation energy and the green represents the overall energy change in the reaction.)
Image
Thank you sooo much! So does the energy released have to be equal to the energy used? What would happen if it's greater than that?
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charco
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(Original post by Presto)
Thank you sooo much! So does the energy released have to be equal to the energy used? What would happen if it's greater than that?
The energy released (reaction enthalpy) does NOT have equal the energy needed to start the reaction (activation energy)

The activation energy is obtained from particle collisions and if the collision has enough energy and the correct orientation bonds may be broken to begin the reaction mechanism (the series of steps needed to go from reactants to products)
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Presto
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(Original post by charco)
The energy released (reaction enthalpy) does NOT have equal the energy needed to start the reaction (activation energy)

The activation energy is obtained from particle collisions and if the collision has enough energy and the correct orientation bonds may be broken to begin the reaction mechanism (the series of steps needed to go from reactants to products)
Thank you!
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