Why does everyone say A levels are so bad? Watch

Nihilisticb*tch
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#1
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I'm just starting year 12 and basically I keep hearing from older friends and people on social media that A levels are really bad and all that. People are always complaining on Twitter about how hard they are and stuff and I really want to know what all the fuss is about. As someone who is about to start doing 4 A levels this is understandably disheartening. I did really well in my gcses ( 5 9s and 5 8s, so the equivalent of all A*) by working moderately hard but I understand that I will have to work much harder for A levels. I was kind of looking forward to A levels because I want to learn more about science but now I'm kinda scared that I'm going to fail or not be able to cope with the work load. Basically, long story short i want to know whether they're actually that bad and if so what makes them difficult and how can I be successful in them.
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Svesh
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If you like to work and actually enjoy the subjects a levels will be a breeze
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Nihilisticb*tch
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(Original post by Svesh)
If you like to work and actually enjoy the subjects a levels will be a breeze
I wouldn't say I *like* to work but I do like reading about the subjects I have chosen and am genuinely eager to learn more about them. The reason I took 4 was because I was so torn between the subjects as I want to learn more about all of them. I ended up taking maths physics chemistry and biology. I was looking forward to learning but now I'm scared that my love for these subjects will be ruined by me failing at them.
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Infinite Series
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A-Levels require a bit more effort than GCSE's, but most people are unwilling to put in the extra effort, hence why they don't do very well and so complain about the system. You need to understand that most A-Level exams require different techniques to GCSE, e.g more structured, specific, or detailed answers. If you refuse to adjust your study techniques, you will probably not do as well as those that do. I just finished year 12 and got AAB (4% off AAA which is the highest grade you can get in year 12 btw) in maths, biology and chemistry.

Some general advice:
Ensure you study every day for all your subjects- at least half an hour each (outside of school). If you miss a day, ensure you catch up on the time missed.
You don't want to be in the position of having to catch up on a lot of work which you should've done.

Also, learn what the mark schemes require for each of those subjects as it is more specific and detailed than during your GCSE's, and a lot of people fail to adjust to this change, hence why they may find A-Levels more difficult than it actually is.

Good luck
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SilverWater
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#5
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It depends imo. Like I really enjoyed Chemistry at GCSE but after going through I have established I dislike the subject. But my level of hatred for Geography will forever be paramount :lol:

Imo whatever combination you choose whether you liked at GCSE or what you probably will find a subject you will dislike compared to others.
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bluebird39
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They’re hard if you let the workload build up. I started with 4 subjects but dropped one (history) just before year 12 exam season because I didn’t enjoy the topics we were doing which completely reduced my motivation for it. Just don’t take on too much is all I’d say and if you are struggling do talk about it as it does release the stress. Overall, A Levels for me weren’t as hard as people made out. Those moaning on Twitter are usually the ones who;
a) aren’t doing enough work or b) are Secretly acing every subject and need some attention.
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Svesh
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
I wouldn't say I *like* to work but I do like reading about the subjects I have chosen and am genuinely eager to learn more about them. The reason I took 4 was because I was so torn between the subjects as I want to learn more about all of them. I ended up taking maths physics chemistry and biology. I was looking forward to learning but now I'm scared that my love for these subjects will be ruined by me failing at them.
One of the hardest combinations but if you start working from the beginning you should be fine. Most people only fail if they cram the whole years worth of content right before the exams
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ibyghee
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
I'm just starting year 12 and basically I keep hearing from older friends and people on social media that A levels are really bad and all that. People are always complaining on Twitter about how hard they are and stuff and I really want to know what all the fuss is about. As someone who is about to start doing 4 A levels this is understandably disheartening. I did really well in my gcses ( 5 9s and 5 8s, so the equivalent of all A*) by working moderately hard but I understand that I will have to work much harder for A levels. I was kind of looking forward to A levels because I want to learn more about science but now I'm kinda scared that I'm going to fail or not be able to cope with the work load. Basically, long story short i want to know whether they're actually that bad and if so what makes them difficult and how can I be successful in them.
youll be absouletly fine, youll fly by it like knife through air (yes not butter...air) (and also not a vacuum) so you got to put a little effort constantly to keep it up and get those grades you want.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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#9
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(Original post by Grade A)
A-Levels require a bit more effort than GCSE's, but most people are unwilling to put in the extra effort, hence why they don't do very well and so complain about the system. You need to understand that most A-Level exams require different techniques to GCSE, e.g more structured, specific, or detailed answers. If you refuse to adjust your study techniques, you will probably not do as well as those that do. I just finished year 12 and got AAB (4% off AAA which is the highest grade you can get in year 12 btw) in maths, biology and chemistry.

Some general advice:
Ensure you study every day for all your subjects- at least half an hour each (outside of school). If you miss a day, ensure you catch up on the time missed.
You don't want to be in the position of having to catch up on a lot of work which you should've done.

Also, learn what the mark schemes require for each of those subjects as it is more specific and detailed than during your GCSE's, and a lot of people fail to adjust to this change, hence why they may find A-Levels more difficult than it actually is.

Good luck
Thank you this was very helpful. I am very willing to put in more work than I did for gcses because tbh I didn't really do that much work for gcses. I didn't revise properly and often slacked off and didn't revise for very long. I plan on making use of the few frees that I have and also want to try and read around my subjects to broaden my knowledge. If the work becomes too much I will drop one A level but I really don't want to do that as all my work will have been for nothing.
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JMR2019.
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
I'm just starting year 12 and basically I keep hearing from older friends and people on social media that A levels are really bad and all that. People are always complaining on Twitter about how hard they are and stuff and I really want to know what all the fuss is about. As someone who is about to start doing 4 A levels this is understandably disheartening. I did really well in my gcses ( 5 9s and 5 8s, so the equivalent of all A*) by working moderately hard but I understand that I will have to work much harder for A levels. I was kind of looking forward to A levels because I want to learn more about science but now I'm kinda scared that I'm going to fail or not be able to cope with the work load. Basically, long story short i want to know whether they're actually that bad and if so what makes them difficult and how can I be successful in them.
It’s not hard if you like the subjects and keep working at it.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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(Original post by ibyghee)
youll be absouletly fine, youll fly by it like knife through air (yes not butter...air) (and also not a vacuum) so you got to put a little effort constantly to keep it up and get those grades you want.
Hopefully I will. I'm gonna work as hard as I can without mentally collapsing and hopefully it will pay off.
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Zerco
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#12
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
I'm just starting year 12 and basically I keep hearing from older friends and people on social media that A levels are really bad and all that. People are always complaining on Twitter about how hard they are and stuff and I really want to know what all the fuss is about. As someone who is about to start doing 4 A levels this is understandably disheartening. I did really well in my gcses ( 5 9s and 5 8s, so the equivalent of all A*) by working moderately hard but I understand that I will have to work much harder for A levels. I was kind of looking forward to A levels because I want to learn more about science but now I'm kinda scared that I'm going to fail or not be able to cope with the work load. Basically, long story short i want to know whether they're actually that bad and if so what makes them difficult and how can I be successful in them.
...Whaaaat? I just finished my A levels (Business and IT) and they were really easy, honestly. I did the bare minimum of revision and I got A* all around. No idea what people are complaining about unless its something like Physics, Maths, Chemistry or that kind of stuff.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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(Original post by Svesh)
One of the hardest combinations but if you start working from the beginning you should be fine. Most people only fail if they cram the whole years worth of content right before the exams
Yeah I'm gonna work as hard as I am mentally capable of because I want to do really well in my A levels. Right now my target is to get at least AABB and if my gcses are anything to go off of then I think that's a reasonable target.
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ibyghee
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
Hopefully I will. I'm gonna work as hard as I can without mentally collapsing and hopefully it will pay off.
What i did was rest like a lazy ass whale dead on a beach the first year. So i got triple AAA. When i should be aiming for that A* . Keep in mind i only got 8 in maths and the rest i got As and Bs. Boi. YOU did better than me, You're gunna zoom past, A* student no doubt. You wont even have to worry bout nothing. Just keep doing that revision keeping on top of stuff. Listen to the teacher and pay attention. Ez grades.
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ThatGuy107
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It’s simple, A-Level exams are far harder. The content is harder and there’s a lot more of it! Because of this most people think that A-Levels are hell, but the grade boundaries of the exams are usually lower if that means anything...
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SilverWater
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(Original post by Thomas_Grimes_17)
It’s simple, A-Level exams are far harder. The content is harder and there’s a lot more of it! Because of this most people think that A-Levels are hell, but the grade boundaries of the exams are usually lower if that means anything...
Unless you take A level Chemistry where the grade boundaries are forever high.
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ThatGuy107
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(Original post by SilverWater)
Unless you take A level Chemistry where the grade boundaries are forever high.
That is true, rip me this year 😬
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Trinculo
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
If the work becomes too much I will drop one A level but I really don't want to do that as all my work will have been for nothing.
But you're a nihilistic b*tch, so of course your work will have been for nothing.
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Alexty28
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#19
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Honestly it is hard work, but I prefer them to GCSEs. I don't dread going into college everyday like with school, because at A Level I only study what I want to study.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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#20
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(Original post by Trinculo)
But you're a nihilistic b*tch, so of course your work will have been for nothing.
LMAO true but you know i like to pretend that the things I do have a point to them even though they don't.
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