Why does everyone say A levels are so bad? Watch

Nihilisticb*tch
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#41
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#41
(Original post by SilverWater)
It depends imo. Like I really enjoyed Chemistry at GCSE but after going through I have established I dislike the subject. But my level of hatred for Geography will forever be paramount :lol:

Imo whatever combination you choose whether you liked at GCSE or what you probably will find a subject you will dislike compared to others.
yeah that's probably true. The good thing about taking 4 is that if I find I really hate one of the subjects, I can drop it after the first year.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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#42
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(Original post by ihatePE)
everyone experiences it different, but I can bet that the majority feel some kind of pressure towards the final year. My year 12 was honestly so good and light weight, I didnt even think my AS results day was concerning, it went so fast. but I definitely felt a leap during year 13. TBH things always sound more terrifying until you yourself actually do it.
Yeah I mean they're obviously going to be stressful but people act like they're the worst thing ever but idk about that.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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#43
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#43
(Original post by green505)
A levels are hard but definitely manageable. My tip would be make sure that you stay on top of your work and manage your stress. I just finished my A levels and my stress got really bad cause I as putting too much pressure on myself which made things 10 times worse. Also with biology if you are getting 40% at the end of year one you are doing well it takes time to get the exam technique right.
Thanks for the advice. A lot of people say to expect lower grades at least at first because it's a big jump and since you're in a higher ability pool of people then it's much harder to get good grades.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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#44
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#44
(Original post by DrawTheLine)
They are very hard because they have so much content. You need good skills to answer exams how examiners want you to. They need a lot if application too.

Keep up with the work from the beginning, ask when you aren't sure and do practice papers.
Okay I'll make sure i do that
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Nihilisticb*tch
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#45
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#45
(Original post by YasudaSayo)
Your mental health will deteriorate and you'll drop out. Gl hf
Not necessarily. Plenty of people do really well in A levels. Dropping out isn't an option to me, if I'm failing I will have to try and improve as best I can
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Nihilisticb*tch
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#46
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#46
(Original post by Anesta)
A levels require a lot more responsibility. There aren't many people there to pressurise you to do the work so you need to take matters into your own hands.

Actually picking subjects you love to do is important too. Won't feel like work if you enjoy doing it!
I find that I really enjoy the subjects I'm taking so hopefully revision won't be too much of a drag
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Nihilisticb*tch
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#47
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#47
(Original post by TWDelaney)
For me, doing 4 A Levels was harder than doing my Masters Degree. The sheer workload compared to school really slaps you in the face, and for many students (myself included), the time demands are real wakeup call when you've just coasted through secondary school doing little to no work and still coming out with decent grades. That just isn't an option at A Level. In addition to this, the regular homework demands by each lecturer (who seems unaware that you have 3 other A Levels to do as well) can really be overwhelming if you fall behind on time management - and this is a hurdle many people fall at, because up until now, you haven't had to manage your time at all as everybody else has done it for you.

Oh yeah, content-wise, they're a lot more challenging than GCSEs, so it's a big step up.
I'm willing to take the challenge though. I didn't push myself at all at Gcse and I coasted through most of it. But I plan on really working hard this year. I don't really mind working because I enjoy all of my subjects. It will be hard at times but if I manage it well and take care of my mental health then I think I will be fine
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Nihilisticb*tch
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#48
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#48
(Original post by 090801)
With those grades at GCSE, I think your work ethic is already amazing. A levels are more heavy on content and application but it’s mainly just all about the amount of time you put into practicing the exams. I took Biology, maths, chemistry and psychology and to be honest I regret not making notes and looking over classwork right from the very start so I am definitely planning to do that in year 13 and recommend you do that as well. Don’t overload yourself, just read over and make sure you fully understand the content after lessons because especially in chemistry, there is a lot of application. At the start of the year it will seem hard however it will progressively get easier if you put in the work and the grade boundaries are generally pretty alright. If you have any specific subject questions feel free to ask? I did WJEC exam board btw and got AAAA.
thanks for the advice
I plan on working hard throughout this year. I didn't push myself too much during gcses so I want to put my all into A levels and come out with the best grade possible.
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onebro
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#49
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#49
You will be fine, as long as you put in the effort. Maths and Physics are big step up from GCSE. (don't know about biology and chemistry. i haven't studied those) You definitely need to be organized, have good folder management system for different subjects, and not leave coursework for last day.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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#50
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#50
(Original post by onebro)
You will be fine, as long as you put in the effort. Maths and Physics are big step up from GCSE. (don't know about biology and chemistry. i haven't studied those) You definitely need to be organized, have good folder management system for different subjects, and not leave coursework for last day.
I plan on working as hard as possible for my A levels.
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GalGirl101
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#51
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#51
They aren't too horrendous as long as you like your subjects and you work (didn't do that second one which explains my results but oh well got into my firm). But yes there will be times where you start questioning why you took this subject. Happens with nearly everyone, even the ones who took one of their A-Level subjects to degree level
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KimY5t
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#52
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#52
My friend keeps telling me that A Levels are basically pointless and are just a waste of time and make you stress (she's doing an apprenticeship) so I'm finding it hard to talk to her about my worries with starting A Levels
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Chem -> med
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#53
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I mainly found it difficult because of how strict the mark schemes were and how despite your answer addressing the question and writing down relevant points, you'd still be wrong because someone decided so. It felt more like I was discouraged from further reading and exploring the subject so I started to hate it and it felt like a chore to study for (This is why I prefer uni exams). Like how you're a robot and you are programmed to answer in a certain way.

As for content, it wasn't too difficult if you had regular commitment to studies and balancing your life with it
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TWDelaney
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#54
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#54
(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
I'm willing to take the challenge though. I didn't push myself at all at Gcse and I coasted through most of it. But I plan on really working hard this year. I don't really mind working because I enjoy all of my subjects. It will be hard at times but if I manage it well and take care of my mental health then I think I will be fine
Oh yeah, definitely do it. With a little bit of elbow grease and determination, you'll get through them! It'll be a bumpy road, but these things always are. What is life without overcoming a bit of adversity, eh?

Best of luck!
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jsmith6131
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#55
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
Thanks this is quite encouraging. I think it's different for everyone so maybe some people find it more difficult than others. I'm gonna try and put in a lot of work and hopefully I'll be fine
I started working from day 1 which makes the journey easier
Establish early what you struggle with so you can fix it!
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RevisionGuide
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#56
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#56
A Levels are only hard if you make them hard yourself. Study effectively and put the time in and you will achieve. Most of the people who exaggerate the difficulty of A Levels tend to be those who leave revision till the last minute, or those who give up before they have even tried. Obtain a positive mentality from the get go.
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neyla12
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#57
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#57
If you like to work and actually enjoy the subjects a levels will be a breeze and plex Kodi Lucky Patcher
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lalliboo
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#58
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#58
(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
I wouldn't say I *like* to work but I do like reading about the subjects I have chosen and am genuinely eager to learn more about them. The reason I took 4 was because I was so torn between the subjects as I want to learn more about all of them. I ended up taking maths physics chemistry and biology. I was looking forward to learning but now I'm scared that my love for these subjects will be ruined by me failing at them.
I took Physics, biology and chemistry.
It's a massive step up from GCSE's, less for you as you've done the new specification. So at the immediate start, if you are struggling don't worry about it.
A levels require that you know how you need to revise and how you absorb information. Especially large chunks of it in Biology!!! You also need to know what the exam board wants from you in the questions.

I have been struggling with these the last year and I want to cry and give up all the time. Not exactly hopeful or inspiring but if you work on these two areas and just keep working after school, you shouldn't get to my position where I've had to take endless retakes to get good grades for predicted grades and I've only got one last chance and I'm not hopeful about it.

Good luck. Work from the start and you'll be fine. Sorry this message comes from someone who wants to give up. Constant failure is a bitter pill to swallow!
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YasudaSayo
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#59
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
Not necessarily. Plenty of people do really well in A levels. Dropping out isn't an option to me, if I'm failing I will have to try and improve as best I can
Sadly 99% of people can't relate to that
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nmudz_009
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#60
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#60
(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
I'm just starting year 12 and basically I keep hearing from older friends and people on social media that A levels are really bad and all that. People are always complaining on Twitter about how hard they are and stuff and I really want to know what all the fuss is about. As someone who is about to start doing 4 A levels this is understandably disheartening. I did really well in my gcses ( 5 9s and 5 8s, so the equivalent of all A*) by working moderately hard but I understand that I will have to work much harder for A levels. I was kind of looking forward to A levels because I want to learn more about science but now I'm kinda scared that I'm going to fail or not be able to cope with the work load. Basically, long story short i want to know whether they're actually that bad and if so what makes them difficult and how can I be successful in them.
You will be okay just keep up the work ethic which got you your good gcse grades and take confidence from the fact that you only had to work moderately hard to get them. And i'm sure it'll be easy for you to step it up if needed too.
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