Rosalina K
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Hello fellow students,

I've been debating whether or not to apply for gov & economics or just economics at LSE. It's definitely my first choice, but since I didn't do further maths( although planning to do it this year) there's probably a higher chance of me getting into G&E compared to Eco. But then again, considering economics is probably the more "prestigious" degree, I don't know if I should give it a shot anyways. Any advice open for discussion?

Ps. I already have a personal statement draft dedicated to economics, so if anyone recommends G&E please could give me some advice on PS that will be greatly appreciated.
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akpo
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(Original post by Rosalina K)
Hello fellow students,

I've been debating whether or not to apply for gov & economics or just economics at LSE. It's definitely my first choice, but since I didn't do further maths( although planning to do it this year) there's probably a higher chance of me getting into G&E compared to Eco. But then again, considering economics is probably the more "prestigious" degree, I don't know if I should give it a shot anyways. Any advice open for discussion?

Ps. I already have a personal statement draft dedicated to economics, so if anyone recommends G&E please could give me some advice on PS that will be greatly appreciated.
I’m just going to be honest, it sounds a lot like your settling for a course because of the easier statistics of getting in, and it doesn’t really work like that. Yes most lse offers for economics are obtained to those doing further maths, but not all, especially international students who don’t all have access to doing further maths/equivalent. Further maths isn’t even a requirement for lse economics (despite recommendation). Government and economics is a very specific course, and because lse like specific personal statements, your ps should likely spend 50:50 discussing government and economics separately as two subjects. (I’m not so certain on this one, because a few ppe applicants from oxford tend to apply for this course). If your genuinely interested in G&E I’d say go for it, if not, don’t let further maths limit you from applying to economics at lse. Good luck.
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Rosalina K
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(Original post by akpo)
I’m just going to be honest, it sounds a lot like your settling for a course because of the easier statistics of getting in, and it doesn’t really work like that. Yes most lse offers for economics are obtained to those doing further maths, but not all, especially international students who don’t all have access to doing further maths/equivalent. Further maths isn’t even a requirement for lse economics (despite recommendation). Government and economics is a very specific course, and because lse like specific personal statements, your ps should likely spend 50:50 discussing government and economics separately as two subjects. (I’m not so certain on this one, because a few ppe applicants from oxford tend to apply for this course). If your genuinely interested in G&E I’d say go for it, if not, don’t let further maths limit you from applying to economics at lse. Good luck.
Thank you. Well, Ive looked into both courses and G&E does sound more interesting and since I really enjoy macro, so it might be worthwhile taking. But then again , economics is what I initially wanted to study, also I've been hearing from many people it's more well regarded than a joint degree (of course take that with a pinch of salt ) Since I really do want to study at LSE , I'm just want to make myself more competitive I guess. Would study further maths this year ( year 13) help ?

Edit: just to add onto that , gov and eco personal statement would greatly affect my other uni choices right ? Given that I want to do purely economics in other unis I apply to. I'm not very familiar with the UCAS system.
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artful_lounger
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I'd note LSE seems to have a tendency to offer other courses to students if they don't quite meet the high level for the very popular ones, but are otherwise very strong applicants and they would want to take them (e.g. sometimes offering a joint honours course with another subject rather than the single honours course). As such, even if you apply for Economics you might get an offer for Government & Economics anyway.

If you are only, or mainly, interested in Economics, then you should apply to that course, and not the joint honours course. As above, they put a lot of weight on the PS and if you can't convince yourself that you are interested in both for reasons other than "trying to beat the odds", then you probably won't convince them either. This, along with the fact all your other options are for single subject Economics, seems to be pretty clear you should stick with that.
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Rosalina K
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I'd note LSE seems to have a tendency to offer other courses to students if they don't quite meet the high level for the very popular ones, but are otherwise very strong applicants and they would want to take them (e.g. sometimes offering a joint honours course with another subject rather than the single honours course). As such, even if you apply for Economics you might get an offer for Government & Economics anyway.

If you are only, or mainly, interested in Economics, then you should apply to that course, and not the joint honours course. As above, they put a lot of weight on the PS and if you can't convince yourself that you are interested in both for reasons other than "trying to beat the odds", then you probably won't convince them either. This, along with the fact all your other options are for single subject Economics, seems to be pretty clear you should stick with that.
Thank you so much for your reply.
I tend to be a very self conscious person so just the thought of applying to one of the top university with other extremely competitive applicants shifts my own goal a bit . Do you know under what circumstances would they offer other courses to applicants or is it just that sort of once in a blue moon occasions?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Rosalina K)
Thank you so much for your reply.
I tend to be a very self conscious person so just the thought of applying to one of the top university with other extremely competitive applicants shifts my own goal a bit . Do you know under what circumstances would they offer other courses to applicants or is it just that sort of once in a blue moon occasions?
I don't know, it seems actually somewhat common....perhaps it's more common for their business suite though, but I'm pretty sure I've seen some examples of single subject applicants being made offers for joint honours courses. Of course maybe I'm extrapolating too much from the posts I've seen indicating people have been made such offers on here...

I imagine generally it depends on the strength of the gathered field of applicants, so if one year has a lot of very strong applications for their Economics course, but similar to usual cohorts for other courses, but they can only take on x students, they try and see if they can try to get those strong students to take an offer on another course.

At the end of the day there's no point applying to a course you don't want to do, because it's going to be just as difficult as one you DO want to do, but you won't have any interest and hence motivation to do it, and you'll probably do worse in the end anyway. A 2:2 or 3rd from LSE isn't going to open that many doors compared to a 2:1 or 1st from a university that is just "below" them. If they accept you great, if not, you have other universities you've applied to that probably will if you were a serious contender who just missed out, or even if you weren't a contender but still strong overall and just not quite strong enough to be considered for LSE.
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Rosalina K
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I don't know, it seems actually somewhat common....perhaps it's more common for their business suite though, but I'm pretty sure I've seen some examples of single subject applicants being made offers for joint honours courses. Of course maybe I'm extrapolating too much from the posts I've seen indicating people have been made such offers on here...

I imagine generally it depends on the strength of the gathered field of applicants, so if one year has a lot of very strong applications for their Economics course, but similar to usual cohorts for other courses, but they can only take on x students, they try and see if they can try to get those strong students to take an offer on another course.

At the end of the day there's no point applying to a course you don't want to do, because it's going to be just as difficult as one you DO want to do, but you won't have any interest and hence motivation to do it, and you'll probably do worse in the end anyway. A 2:2 or 3rd from LSE isn't going to open that many doors compared to a 2:1 or 1st from a university that is just "below" them. If they accept you great, if not, you have other universities you've applied to that probably will if you were a serious contender who just missed out, or even if you weren't a contender but still strong overall and just not quite strong enough to be considered for LSE.
Sounds fair , what other universities would you recommend for economics ? I've heard UCL and Warick are both quite well known for their economic courses as well.

If you don't mind me asking, what course did you study ?
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