How to get graduate jobs

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sesameseeds
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#1
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#1
Dear all,

I have a query to make regarding graduate jobs.

I didn't get the job I wanted after I failed my second degree and thus I feel abit lost. The degree I had completed immediately got me into the job I wanted.

However now that hasn't worked out I am left to look for graduate jobs but I have had no experience of doing so. The only past work experience I completed was in hospitality, working at the university and in caring roles in the hospitals. I almost feel like my degree was abit pointless and I don't know what to put on graduate applications- I mean I don't think they will be like 'oh yes worked in nandos' I'll give her the job.

When I have enquired into places such as starbucks etc the interviewer told me most that work there are university students or school leavers and university graduates have left. This leads me to think that graduates are no longer doing these positions? Or they have secured work beforehand in a job relating to their degree?

Any advice would be appreciated.

SS
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ajj2000
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#2
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#2
(Original post by sesameseeds)
Dear all,

I have a query to make regarding graduate jobs.

I didn't get the job I wanted after I failed my second degree and thus I feel abit lost. The degree I had completed immediately got me into the job I wanted.
What did you study on each degree and what sort of jobs are you looking for?

(Original post by sesameseeds)
However now that hasn't worked out I am left to look for graduate jobs but I have had no experience of doing so. The only past work experience I completed was in hospitality, working at the university and in caring roles in the hospitals. I almost feel like my degree was abit pointless and I don't know what to put on graduate applications- I mean I don't think they will be like 'oh yes worked in nandos' I'll give her the job.
Most grad jobs don't really require much if any experience - and Nandos would look good for teamwork and coping with different people, as does care work.

(Original post by sesameseeds)
When I have enquired into places such as starbucks etc the interviewer told me most that work there are university students or school leavers and university graduates have left. This leads me to think that graduates are no longer doing these positions? Or they have secured work beforehand in a job relating to their degree?
Thats good news! A few years ago Starbucks was full of graduates - they must be finding other jobs now.
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jelly1000
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#3
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#3
(Original post by sesameseeds)
Dear all,

I have a query to make regarding graduate jobs.

I didn't get the job I wanted after I failed my second degree and thus I feel abit lost. The degree I had completed immediately got me into the job I wanted.

However now that hasn't worked out I am left to look for graduate jobs but I have had no experience of doing so. The only past work experience I completed was in hospitality, working at the university and in caring roles in the hospitals. I almost feel like my degree was abit pointless and I don't know what to put on graduate applications- I mean I don't think they will be like 'oh yes worked in nandos' I'll give her the job.

When I have enquired into places such as starbucks etc the interviewer told me most that work there are university students or school leavers and university graduates have left. This leads me to think that graduates are no longer doing these positions? Or they have secured work beforehand in a job relating to their degree?

Any advice would be appreciated.

SS
You are right that just putting you worked in somewhere like Nandos isn't enough to get a graduate job. What you need to do is identify your key achievements/activities and then put down the ones that are most relevant to the job you are applying for onto your CV (based on the job specification) - so you tailor your CV for each job you are applying for.

In terms of jobs in hospitality as a graduate, many places like Starbucks are often reluctant to hire graduates due to the perception that they will be looking for a better job from the moment they start and consequently leave quickly. Obviously some graduates will end up doing those kinds of jobs, but usually those who were already in them whilst at university or had a contact who could put a good word in. I'd love to say all the other graduates would have jobs relevant to their degree, this sadly isn't quite the case. Some will be sat at home job hunting still whilst others may be doing an entry level office job. Some will of course got a good graduate job.
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sesameseeds
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#4
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Ah i see, that makes sense. I guess yes for each type of job I need to be putting something different on my CV. Do you know any specific websites for graduation jobs? I have so far been using indeed. Do you think me volunteering will be useful on my CV?

Thanks for all your advice btw:-)

(Original post by jelly1000)
You are right that just putting you worked in somewhere like Nandos isn't enough to get a graduate job. What you need to do is identify your key achievements/activities and then put down the ones that are most relevant to the job you are applying for onto your CV (based on the job specification) - so you tailor your CV for each job you are applying for.

In terms of jobs in hospitality as a graduate, many places like Starbucks are often reluctant to hire graduates due to the perception that they will be looking for a better job from the moment they start and consequently leave quickly. Obviously some graduates will end up doing those kinds of jobs, but usually those who were already in them whilst at university or had a contact who could put a good word in. I'd love to say all the other graduates would have jobs relevant to their degree, this sadly isn't quite the case. Some will be sat at home job hunting still whilst others may be doing an entry level office job. Some will of course got a good graduate job.
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sesameseeds
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#5
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If graduate jobs don't require much experience, then how come they are competitive? Also how can you stand apart from other individuals on them? I mean I'll see how I go in applying for them...

(Original post by ajj2000)
What did you study on each degree and what sort of jobs are you looking for?



Most grad jobs don't really require much if any experience - and Nandos would look good for teamwork and coping with different people, as does care work.



Thats good news! A few years ago Starbucks was full of graduates - they must be finding other jobs now.
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jelly1000
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(Original post by sesameseeds)
Ah i see, that makes sense. I guess yes for each type of job I need to be putting something different on my CV. Do you know any specific websites for graduation jobs? I have so far been using indeed. Do you think me volunteering will be useful on my CV?

Thanks for all your advice btw:-)
Yes definitley tailor your CV. Tbh I'm not really sure as I used a very sector specific website. Volunteering can be especially if it gives you office experience that you didn't have otherwise. Not sure volunteering in a retail shop would add much extra though other than hiding any potential gap on your CV.
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sesameseeds
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I did Medical Sciences and the second degree was medicine, but i feel like learning about the human body can hardly be applied to something like marketing or finance... I just feel like I haven't gained a huge amount from doing it but obviously the practical side I have such as cannulation, taking bloods etc

(Original post by ajj2000)
What did you study on each degree and what sort of jobs are you looking for?



Most grad jobs don't really require much if any experience - and Nandos would look good for teamwork and coping with different people, as does care work.



Thats good news! A few years ago Starbucks was full of graduates - they must be finding other jobs now.
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sesameseeds
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#8
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Ah I see, I do that mainly to give me structure to my day and meet new people otherwise I end up not motivated at all! After doing that I go and apply for jobs on my laptop. What sector do you work in?

(Original post by jelly1000)
Yes definitley tailor your CV. Tbh I'm not really sure as I used a very sector specific website. Volunteering can be especially if it gives you office experience that you didn't have otherwise. Not sure volunteering in a retail shop would add much extra though other than hiding any potential gap on your CV.
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ajj2000
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#9
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#9
(Original post by sesameseeds)
If graduate jobs don't require much experience, then how come they are competitive? Also how can you stand apart from other individuals on them? I mean I'll see how I go in applying for them...
Good question. Graduate jobs are competitive because lots of people want them compared with the number of companies who want new, untrained graduates. For example in my are - accountancy in London - if I run an advert for a graduate trainee I get lots of very good CVs. If I look for someone with 2 years experience as a graduate, or a similar amount of experience as a school leaver its pretty hard to find reasonable candidates.

The ways to stand out vary by industry. Lots of people like to see some working history of anything which looks like a busy job with some stresses thrown in - so care work, Nandos are great. Likewise positions of responsibility at university or other organisations, any insight schemes or shadowing specific to the type of job and summer placements help.

In reality there are lots of great candidates so its hard figuring out who to meet with.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by sesameseeds)
I did Medical Sciences and the second degree was medicine, but i feel like learning about the human body can hardly be applied to something like marketing or finance... I just feel like I haven't gained a huge amount from doing it but obviously the practical side I have such as cannulation, taking bloods etc
You have a huge range of things you can apply for - way more than most graduates. I don't know much about these areas but I'm sure some time googling with show what people of similar backgrounds do. I know (personally - not second hand) two people who dropped out of medicine and became solicitors and a number of accountants for example.

Pharmaceutical companies really like people of your background in lots of their positions. Some specialist marketing and sales jobs are open to you - these are very different to normal jobs and often pay a lot for not a lot of hardship. I guess research/ phd is also a possibility?

What have you considered so far?
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sesameseeds
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#11
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i see, I did care work, nandos and student ambassador work and I was also Vice-president of a society and vice-presidents of a few medical societies. Would you recommend any particular type of shadowing now? What is your opinion on volunteering? Is it a waste of time?



(Original post by ajj2000)
Good question. Graduate jobs are competitive because lots of people want them compared with the number of companies who want new, untrained graduates. For example in my are - accountancy in London - if I run an advert for a graduate trainee I get lots of very good CVs. If I look for someone with 2 years experience as a graduate, or a similar amount of experience as a school leaver its pretty hard to find reasonable candidates.

The ways to stand out vary by industry. Lots of people like to see some working history of anything which looks like a busy job with some stresses thrown in - so care work, Nandos are great. Likewise positions of responsibility at university or other organisations, any insight schemes or shadowing specific to the type of job and summer placements help.

In reality there are lots of great candidates so its hard figuring out who to meet with.
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sesameseeds
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Do you know however if they need to do the LPC for example? and how did they get into accounting for example? I haven't considered much at the moment and just started my job hunt, I have been in medicine and that bubble for a long time so I am trying to explore what else is out there or that I would enjoy.

(Original post by ajj2000)
You have a huge range of things you can apply for - way more than most graduates. I don't know much about these areas but I'm sure some time googling with show what people of similar backgrounds do. I know (personally - not second hand) two people who dropped out of medicine and became solicitors and a number of accountants for example.

Pharmaceutical companies really like people of your background in lots of their positions. Some specialist marketing and sales jobs are open to you - these are very different to normal jobs and often pay a lot for not a lot of hardship. I guess research/ phd is also a possibility?

What have you considered so far?
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ajj2000
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#13
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(Original post by sesameseeds)
i see, I did care work, nandos and student ambassador work and I was also Vice-president of a society and vice-presidents of a few medical societies. Would you recommend any particular type of shadowing now? What is your opinion on volunteering? Is it a waste of time?
Well - you already have a good CV so thats all looking good.

My thoughts on shadowing are that you think of a few broad areas of work which may appeal to you and in which you would be a viable candidate. Then try to organise between one and four days shadowing in a couple of places for each type of work. Also try to meet anyone you know in those areas to get some insight into what the job and career path is like. You rule out things that don't suit, figure out why they don't work for you and look at something better.

There is a guy who has posted on these boards a few times - an electrical engineer from America. He describes how he made a list of a few possible careers and went to meet people in each of them to understand more. An interesting post (he's posted this more than once) and a good idea i'd say.

For volunteering I think it depends why you are doing it? To keep busy, have a flexible schedule and have something to talk about in interviews its great. To develop some skills in some way related to the kind of jobs you are interested in I guess it can work. I'm not at all convinced about unpaid internships of more than a month - thats quite long enough to find out if a career type is a good match for you.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by sesameseeds)
Do you know however if they need to do the LPC for example? and how did they get into accounting for example? I haven't considered much at the moment and just started my job hunt, I have been in medicine and that bubble for a long time so I am trying to explore what else is out there or that I would enjoy.
The ones who went into law - one did law as a second degree (it was somewhat affordable at that time) then worked in a pizza place for a few years with smal children. She then went into some specialist field (might have been science related - not sure if I understand it) and earned a fortune (literally). The other I think did the one year graduate course and then an LPC type course.

The accountants I've known all joined big firm graduate schemes. In my class studying for Chartered Accountancy exams there were at least 3 (I think 4) out of around 25 of us. I've met others since (you learn a lot about people from linkedin!) - generally went the Big 4 route.
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sesameseeds
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Thank you, I think shadowing would be a good idea as sometimes I have wondered what individuals in the financial sector do day-to-day.

That's a really good idea what the guy from America did, I think I'll try find his post!! Even thought I've worked in hospitality, it's something I find doesn't fit my personality and I don't know I feel I don't enjoy it hugely. I do want to find something I'm good at or have an aptitude for and enjoy without trying really really hard to enjoy it -basically forcing myself really.

I mainly volunteer to keep myself busy, have structure in my day and yes have something to talk about in my interviews to show I am proactive rather then just saying yes I sit at home all day just applying for jobs. And for myself I do it for social reasons just as meeting people and making me more confident in interviews.


(Original post by ajj2000)
Well - you already have a good CV so thats all looking good.

My thoughts on shadowing are that you think of a few broad areas of work which may appeal to you and in which you would be a viable candidate. Then try to organise between one and four days shadowing in a couple of places for each type of work. Also try to meet anyone you know in those areas to get some insight into what the job and career path is like. You rule out things that don't suit, figure out why they don't work for you and look at something better.

There is a guy who has posted on these boards a few times - an electrical engineer from America. He describes how he made a list of a few possible careers and went to meet people in each of them to understand more. An interesting post (he's posted this more than once) and a good idea i'd say.

For volunteering I think it depends why you are doing it? To keep busy, have a flexible schedule and have something to talk about in interviews its great. To develop some skills in some way related to the kind of jobs you are interested in I guess it can work. I'm not at all convinced about unpaid internships of more than a month - thats quite long enough to find out if a career type is a good match for you.
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Gordon24
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#16
(Original post by sesameseeds)
Dear all,

I have a query to make regarding graduate jobs.

I didn't get the job I wanted after I failed my second degree and thus I feel abit lost. The degree I had completed immediately got me into the job I wanted.

However now that hasn't worked out I am left to look for graduate jobs but I have had no experience of doing so. The only past work experience I completed was in hospitality, working at the university and in caring roles in the hospitals. I almost feel like my degree was abit pointless and I don't know what to put on graduate applications- I mean I don't think they will be like 'oh yes worked in nandos' I'll give her the job.

When I have enquired into places such as starbucks etc the interviewer told me most that work there are university students or school leavers and university graduates have left. This leads me to think that graduates are no longer doing these positions? Or they have secured work beforehand in a job relating to their degree?

Any advice would be appreciated.

SS
Unfortunately, it is all about experience these days,

University degrees have become somewhat devalued by the number of students who go to university.
We all have it drummed into us when we are at school. Go to university, get a degree if you want to succeed and have good job. However a big part of the reason they want students to go because it increases their reputation if they report back to ofsted or the board of governors that a high percentage of their students went on to study higher education.

Employers nowadays certainly value experience over education, making it very hard for graduates because how are they supposed to get the experience in the first place. Often a placement year can help however that doesn't always cut it because it is not seen as proper 'hands on' experience.

I saw a job advert online for a 'Trainee' role. Part of the requirements stated the following...
'we are looking for the individual to have 18-24 months experience '

This is how ridiculous it is getting, even a trainee must have experience!
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Prii21
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#17
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#17
Ugh yeah it's super annoying when companies want you to have experience when you're just a student or a fresh graduate!
I was having a hard time too when I graduated this year but then I found out about the website Magnet.me, which is basically a graduate careers network, so they only post jobs that are relevant for students or graduates that have little or no experience. And they also match you with jobs that suit your specific profile. Thought you guys might find it useful too, because it really helped me find something that really suited me.
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sesameseeds
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#18
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#18
thank you very much- will check it out!!! what job did you find and what did you graduate with??

(Original post by Prii21)
Ugh yeah it's super annoying when companies want you to have experience when you're just a student or a fresh graduate!
I was having a hard time too when I graduated this year but then I found out about the website Magnet.me, which is basically a graduate careers network, so they only post jobs that are relevant for students or graduates that have little or no experience. And they also match you with jobs that suit your specific profile. Thought you guys might find it useful too, because it really helped me find something that really suited me.
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sesameseeds
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#19
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#19
I definitely agree with all of this!! I was thinking that myself!! i remember apply to university and get a good job was drummed into us, i just feel universities leave you poorly equipped to handle life after graduation. They are big businesses at the end of the day and I sometimes feel a trainee apprentice as a dental nurse or something would have got me a salary but also got me onto a career ladder rather then just a biomedical science degree.

(Original post by Gordon24)
Unfortunately, it is all about experience these days,

University degrees have become somewhat devalued by the number of students who go to university.
We all have it drummed into us when we are at school. Go to university, get a degree if you want to succeed and have good job. However a big part of the reason they want students to go because it increases their reputation if they report back to ofsted or the board of governors that a high percentage of their students went on to study higher education.

Employers nowadays certainly value experience over education, making it very hard for graduates because how are they supposed to get the experience in the first place. Often a placement year can help however that doesn't always cut it because it is not seen as proper 'hands on' experience.

I saw a job advert online for a 'Trainee' role. Part of the requirements stated the following...
'we are looking for the individual to have 18-24 months experience '

This is how ridiculous it is getting, even a trainee must have experience!
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intesar
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#20
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https://www.grb.uk.com/sbm/15270 <<< Here is a great place to look for graduate jobs and they help you with application process if you email them.
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