My mother wants to put camera in my room when I move to halls Watch

alws
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#61
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#61
(Original post by emmataco)
It wouldnt be illegal if OP agreed to it, which she technically is as a condition of staying in her moms good books

It would be illegal if OP didnt know but she does
Yes, that is correct.
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3121
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#62
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(Original post by JammyDodger0135)
loooooool, mad.

Mate youre going to uni, you need to tell her just tell her no. She cant stop you from going to uni, and youre not a child anymore
Someone has to pay his or hers fees and living costs, university doesn't always come with financial independence especially if you're an international student
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Paracosm
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#63
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#63
Simply tell her no, what a horrible thing to want to do. Stand up to her.
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Bulletzone
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#64
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#64
I understand some parents are very strict/helicopter parents but this can not be real?
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Johnathan94
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#65
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(Original post by alws)
Data Protection Act 1998 and Human Rights Act 1998 can both be used to prosecute those who use covert cameras in "places where an individual expects privacy"(e.g bathroom of your house, if other residents use that bathroom) and in other people's residences (which applies to OPs situation). This is assuming OP does not consent to the camera being installed, and I don't understand why he would if he is so against it.
But this is not a covert camera, he's agreeing to it being placed there by his mother because he feels he needs to in order to continue receiving his mother's financial support - at a minimum, it's certainly indisputable that he's aware of it. How can it be a covert camera if he knows it's there? And how can he have a reasonable expectation of privacy, if he knows it's there?
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Johnathan94
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#66
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(Original post by ThePricklyOne)
It's illegal because all other folks entering the room will need to consent to being filmed by student's mom. Should any one undress in the room, the already illegal filming will break some laws on sexual exploitation/invasion of right to privacy (e.g. sim to upskirting or filming people in changing rooms). Should anyone using the room be under 16, it gets more serious.

Agree there's defo something wrong with the mom.
By that reasoning, every home security system in the UK is illegal.
Also, she spends 20p on a little sign that says "CCTV in use" and bam, no longer illegal.
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L.D.S.
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#67
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#67
I’d say no and offer to keep in contact regularly with phone calls or video calls if that would make her feel better?
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NYU℠
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#68
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#68
Assuming that you would be getting changed in your room, and therefore naked, you would be illegally creating child pornography and your mother would be illegally consuming it.

Due to the risk of this being on University network, the University would obviously not allow it if they had knowledge of it.

Big no no.
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It's****ingWOODY
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#69
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(Original post by AzureCeleste)
Kinda weird that tbh.
What is she going to see you do? Wake up, get dressed leave the room for however long, come back and go to sleep. You could easily choose to study in libraries if the intention is monitor you studying or something. So kinda pointless on her behalf.


Anyway it's already been established to be illegal
I assume OP is female and her mother wants to see if her daughter is getting railed by diff guys on the daily.

EDIT LOL post #69, so fitting :rofl:
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username4241764
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#70
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This isn't normal, it's an invasion of your privacy. Maybe you could have a word with a member of staff from the uni you're going to about this without your parents knowing? Whether you're under 18 or not, your parents shouldn't have the right to spy on you like this. It's a horribly controlling thing to do and is not the right way to parent. I don't know if it is or not, but it sounds borderline illegal to me anyway.
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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#71
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This sounds absolutely ridiculous to me, and to be honest I'm not sure there's any reasoning with these kinds of people once they have ideas in their head. The only thing you can do is quote the law to her, and perhaps contact your uni to ask them to tell her it's against their terms and conditions (because I'm sorry but a surveillance camera that's in there without the student's permission can't be allowed).

Your mum needs to learn to let go. It's something that all parents need to learn at some point, but some struggle more than others. If she doesn't learn to let go now, you're just going to resent her, and she will regret that.
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DabThruUni
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#72
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(Original post by EleventhDoctor)
I'm an international student, and I have very strict parents.

This October I'll start an undergraduate course in London, and my mother wants to put a camera in my room at halls, and I certainly do not like this idea.

Could anyone give me any proofs whether it is illegal or not, so I could know if I can comehow persuade my mother not to do this.

I will live in Southside halls, if that matters.
What a goddamn control freak
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AzureCeleste
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#73
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(Original post by Johnathan94)
By that reasoning, every home security system in the UK is illegal.
Also, she spends 20p on a little sign that says "CCTV in use" and bam, no longer illegal.
I don't know of anyone who has CCTV in their bathrooms nor bedrooms-the only places in someone's house where you would suspect privacy. So how are peoples home security systems illegal?
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Johnathan94
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#74
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(Original post by AzureCeleste)
I don't know of anyone who has CCTV in their bathrooms nor bedrooms-the only places in someone's house where you would suspect privacy. So how are peoples home security systems illegal?
Well they aren't illegal that's my point - they certainly aren't illegal such that the person occupying the house is the victim.

I have some home security but I'm aware of its existence and I consented to having it installed: am I both the perpetrator and the victim in this reasoning?

My point is... in allowing his mother to place the camera, he knows it's there and therefore has no reasonable expectation of privacy. Quite the opposite, he knows categorically that he doesn't privacy in that environment. Therefore, all of the people who are citing laws pertaining to "covert placement" of cameras are forgetting the quite obvious fact that we're all discussing it with the OP in a public forum - it's not covert, I haven't a clue who he is and even I know she wants to set a camera up!!

The only people who could potentially be victimised by this are any guests who enter his room, although the law does allow for home security systems and given that his bedroom also serves as many other rooms because of the nature of his accommodation, the camera might be deemed reasonable without signage. A cheap 'CCTV in use' sign would remove that all-together though as no one entering his room would have an expectation of privacy.

The mum is a lunatic - I'm not advocating for her, but people should stop cooking up legal arguments and pretending that they're solid when in fact they're quite questionable.
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the beer
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#75
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
This sounds absolutely ridiculous to me, and to be honest I'm not sure there's any reasoning with these kinds of people once they have ideas in their head. The only thing you can do is quote the law to her, and perhaps contact your uni to ask them to tell her it's against their terms and conditions (because I'm sorry but a surveillance camera that's in there without the student's permission can't be allowed).
But it would be with the students permission, only thing to do is spoof the video feed.
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11lewisa
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#76
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(Original post by EleventhDoctor)
I am under 18, and in addition, she's just INCREDIBLY strict. She might come to UK, if I'd break the camera or turn it down, or refuse paying for uni, and for obvious reasons I'm not able to afford it myself yet.
Unis dont usually allow permanent fixations or anything that could damage the walls, so just tell her you'll get fined if you keep it up (as she's the one paying that might dissuade her) It could also violate your halls contract, so she may be responsible for getting you kicked out? idk if thats gonna help but you really need to be trusted with some independence at uni
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AnaBaptist
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#77
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This is definitely illegal and constitutes emotional abuse.
You must tell your mother in no uncertain terms that this is not going to happen. I would urge you to contact the University for further advice and support.
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oktea
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#78
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(Original post by EleventhDoctor)
I'm an international student, and I have very strict parents.

This October I'll start an undergraduate course in London, and my mother wants to put a camera in my room at halls, and I certainly do not like this idea.

Could anyone give me any proofs whether it is illegal or not, so I could know if I can comehow persuade my mother not to do this.

I will live in Southside halls, if that matters.
Put the camera in a box, with a good picture of your room.

Jk

It is completely illegle. Also, they can't visit you easily if your international. So, say your gonna do it. They just dont. and if they ask. Say no.
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Eggyolk
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#79
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i don't think ppl in this thread realise how manipulative some parents can be.
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auburnstar
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#80
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(Original post by Johnathan94)
Well they aren't illegal that's my point - they certainly aren't illegal such that the person occupying the house is the victim.

I have some home security but I'm aware of its existence and I consented to having it installed: am I both the perpetrator and the victim in this reasoning?

My point is... in allowing his mother to place the camera, he knows it's there and therefore has no reasonable expectation of privacy. Quite the opposite, he knows categorically that he doesn't privacy in that environment. Therefore, all of the people who are citing laws pertaining to "covert placement" of cameras are forgetting the quite obvious fact that we're all discussing it with the OP in a public forum - it's not covert, I haven't a clue who he is and even I know she wants to set a camera up!!

The only people who could potentially be victimised by this are any guests who enter his room, although the law does allow for home security systems and given that his bedroom also serves as many other rooms because of the nature of his accommodation, the camera might be deemed reasonable without signage. A cheap 'CCTV in use' sign would remove that all-together though as no one entering his room would have an expectation of privacy.

The mum is a lunatic - I'm not advocating for her, but people should stop cooking up legal arguments and pretending that they're solid when in fact they're quite questionable.
But if the person is under 18 and gets undressed in front of that camera (as would be expected to occur in a dorm room) couldn't that be classed as child pornography under the Sexual Offences Act 2003? Consent does not matter in this case unless the person is over 18.

Plus the property would be owned by the University in question - I imagine a camera of this kind is not a permitted item in the housing contract regardless (most halls won't even let you have a kettle or fridge for fire hazard reasons).

I don't disagree with you, I'm just wondering. Regardless of legality it really is abusive controlling behaviour and is entirely out of line not just morally but from a standpoint of a mother supposed to be respecting her nearly adult children.
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