Elizabuttd
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Hello, I am currently completing a degree in Nutritional Sciences at MMU. I'm considering going on to do a masters in Dietetics, however I have some hang-ups.
If anyone who is in the nutrition/dietetics field, or has completed a dietetics course could offer some advice?
It seems like most Dietetics Masters are 2 years long. Is there a chance that a lot of this time will be re-hashing things I will have already covered in my Nutrition degree?
Do you personally consider completing training to become a Dietitian worthwhile if you are already a registered Nutritionist?
Thank you very much to any who can help me !
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Jcw1998
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To become an accredited dietician (this is what i know for the UK) you need to be HCPC registered- this is really only done through a University course- you might find some shorter courses but i think you'd need to have a relevant course.
Im in my last year of sport and exercise nutrition- Then complete the Dietetics masters in September- 18 months course.
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Coventry University Student Ambassadors
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(Original post by Elizabuttd)
Hello, I am currently completing a degree in Nutritional Sciences at MMU. I'm considering going on to do a masters in Dietetics, however I have some hang-ups.
If anyone who is in the nutrition/dietetics field, or has completed a dietetics course could offer some advice?
It seems like most Dietetics Masters are 2 years long. Is there a chance that a lot of this time will be re-hashing things I will have already covered in my Nutrition degree?
Do you personally consider completing training to become a Dietitian worthwhile if you are already a registered Nutritionist?
Thank you very much to any who can help me !
Hey,

Thank you for your interest in Dietetics.

I am a current Dietetic student so I am able to provide you with some insight into the kind of things that are covered on a dietetics course. Completing a Dietetics degree involves attaining a certain amount of medical expertise and knowledge that you don't learn about in Nutritional Sciences. Therefore, allowing you to work in clinical settings such as hospitals, working with a range of patients with various conditions from mental health to gastrointestinal disorders to different types of nutrition support. The medical knowledge you attain helps you to understand the medical aspects of the patient (e.g. learning about how certain drugs can interfere with nutrition) as well as being able to work with other help professionals. This means you'll be learning about different conditions in-depth from their epidemiology to pathophysiology and making connections to how nutrition impacts a condition, allowing you to create and develop ways to help a patient manage their health and lifestyle.
So, if you choose to do a master's in Dietetics, I imagine you will be building on your knowledge of what you know from your undergrad and going more in-depth.

Personally, becoming a Dietitian is worthwhile because the profession is regulated and protected by the law that you don't get when you become a Nutritionist, for instance. You'd be registered with the HCPC which allows you to practice as a Dietitian, and because of this, only those who have studied a Dietetics degree would be classed as Dietitians.

Despite this post being 2yrs old, I hope this is insightful for anyone interested.

Veronica
BSc Dietetics and Human Nutrition Student
Last edited by Coventry University Student Ambassadors; 8 months ago
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