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PWP2CBT
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I've recently qualified in low intensity CBT and am kicking about on here as I'm looking to do high intensity in the future but if anyone has questions about the job, mental health, career path, experiences etc I'm happy to help
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rikkiman
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(Original post by Charlottelt)
I've recently qualified in low intensity CBT and am kicking about on here as I'm looking to do high intensity in the future but if anyone has questions about the job, mental health, career path, experiences etc I'm happy to help
Hi Charlotte, I currently study an undergraduate degree in an unrelated area, Im in my final year and am thinking of a change in career direction. I do not have any direct experience in this area but I am keen to explore it further, I have supported a family member for a number of years and also had CBT myself in the past for anxiety and depression.

Please can you tell me a bit more information about the role and how I could convert into doing it after graduating,


Many thanks,
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Noodlzzz
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What do you mean by low and high intensity?
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(Original post by Noodlzzz)
What do you mean by low and high intensity?
Say for arguments sake someone had a degree in Psychology, very often those guys want to go off and do 'clinical work' and the only show in town is IAPT for most people.

In practical terms low intensity means you are a PWP. This is the name on your PG diploma. So you do telephone stuff, you do silvercloud and online CBT, you run small groups for six weeks on principles of CBT. You do stress control courses etc.

It's actually a term defined by NICE. If you go on their website there is stacks and stacks of guidance about mild to moderate depression and anxiety and first line referral.

What most lay people call CBT is the 'proper' one on one therapy and that person has at least a PG diploma in high intensity interventions in CBT.

This is an issue that yo-yos around GP surgeries. So a patient comes back to a GP and says yeah this depression and or anxiety has not resolved or come back. GP says well I can refer you to IAPT for some CBT or refer you to someone who can refer you. Great says the patient, gets a referral and ends up on low intensity stuff and is very cross, then is told well you can have one on one but you may have to wait months. The next time the patient comes in they say I'm a bit sceptical about this.
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Charlottelt)
I've recently qualified in low intensity CBT and am kicking about on here as I'm looking to do high intensity in the future but if anyone has questions about the job, mental health, career path, experiences etc I'm happy to help





would u run down opps in the high street/
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PWP2CBT
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(Original post by rikkiman)
Hi Charlotte, I currently study an undergraduate degree in an unrelated area, Im in my final year and am thinking of a change in career direction. I do not have any direct experience in this area but I am keen to explore it further, I have supported a family member for a number of years and also had CBT myself in the past for anxiety and depression.

Please can you tell me a bit more information about the role and how I could convert into doing it after graduating,


Many thanks,
Most courses ask for a related degree so it may be worth contacting a university that teaches Low Intensity Psychological Therapies and ask what they'd accept academically.
In experience terms I've volunteered at my local mind and at a service similar to Samaritans previously. I'd recommend looking for voluntary mental health experience to see if you enjoy the area.
My job is working with mild to moderate anxiety and depressive disorders for CBT based therapy.
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RichardJames123
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do you enjoy it?
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PWP2CBT
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(Original post by Noodlzzz)
What do you mean by low and high intensity?
In most areas of the UK CBT is split into high or low intensity.
Low intensity is on average 6, half hour sessions with a therapist as opposed to high intensity which is about 16 hour long sessions.
More severe or complex cases tend to be put forward for high intensity
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PWP2CBT
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Say for arguments sake someone had a degree in Psychology, very often those guys want to go off and do 'clinical work' and the only show in town is IAPT for most people.

In practical terms low intensity means you are a PWP. This is the name on your PG diploma. So you do telephone stuff, you do silvercloud and online CBT, you run small groups for six weeks on principles of CBT. You do stress control courses etc.

It's actually a term defined by NICE. If you go on their website there is stacks and stacks of guidance about mild to moderate depression and anxiety and first line referral.

What most lay people call CBT is the 'proper' one on one therapy and that person has at least a PG diploma in high intensity interventions in CBT.

This is an issue that yo-yos around GP surgeries. So a patient comes back to a GP and says yeah this depression and or anxiety has not resolved or come back. GP says well I can refer you to IAPT for some CBT or refer you to someone who can refer you. Great says the patient, gets a referral and ends up on low intensity stuff and is very cross, then is told well you can have one on one but you may have to wait months. The next time the patient comes in they say I'm a bit sceptical about this.
Low Intensity works really well for some people but I'm in total agreement that the system is flawed.
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PWP2CBT
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(Original post by Anonymous)
would u run down opps in the high street/
Unsure what you're asking due to typos
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username3934898
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are there heavy days/moments and how do you get through them? do you ever feel personally affected hearing about other people's experiences?
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PWP2CBT
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(Original post by RichardJames123)
do you enjoy it?
Love it! Hard but satisfying
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Anonymous #3
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(Original post by Charlottelt)
I've recently qualified in low intensity CBT and am kicking about on here as I'm looking to do high intensity in the future but if anyone has questions about the job, mental health, career path, experiences etc I'm happy to help
Have you ever worked with someone who has Anti-Social Personality Disorder?
What were they like, what differentiated them from neurotypical people?
And in what context did you meet them? (Walk in patient, long standing patient, inmate etc..)

I'm fairly certain I have ASPD, I've wrote a post that should be up on here soon, I have justification for thinking this and it's come after a long time spent with mental health professionals.
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username3934898
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(Original post by Charlottelt)
Unsure what you're asking due to typos
not a typo :laugh:
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PWP2CBT
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It's hard to a find a balance at times between being warm and open and being closed so as not to let work emotionally affect you but I can honestly say I care about every one of my patients.
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RichardJames123
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(Original post by Charlottelt)
Love it! Hard but satisfying
great to hear, I'm considering a career change. I suffer from anxiety / depression myself so wonder if this would make me feel worse? Particularly drawn to wanting to help others manage their mental health. Is this possible? I'm looking at doing a masters in mental health do you think this would give me a good start
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PWP2CBT
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(Original post by rainclouds-)
are there heavy days/moments and how do you get through them? do you ever feel personally affected hearing about other people's experiences?
There are definitely heavy days. Sharing with colleagues to process what's gone on, going for walks to clear my head, asking my group chats for photos of puppies have all been helpful. If something has been really upsetting you can take the odd day off or ask someone else to take a call potentially.
I can often see parts of myself or my friends/family in patients and can feel personally affected by patients stories. If you feel you can't maintain boundaries however it's recommended that you don't work with a patient.
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PWP2CBT
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(Original post by RichardJames123)
great to hear, I'm considering a career change. I suffer from anxiety / depression myself so wonder if this would make me feel worse? Particularly drawn to wanting to help others manage their mental health. Is this possible? I'm looking at doing a masters in mental health do you think this would give me a good start
Many therapists have been through therapy themselves for anxiety and/or depression if not something more severe. It can certainly be triggering and stressful so you need to reflect yourself whether you can manage in this area.
A masters won't hurt but getting some experience in mental health through volunteering is my recommended way of figuring out if this area is for you.
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PWP2CBT
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Have you ever worked with someone who has Anti-Social Personality Disorder?
What were they like, what differentiated them from neurotypical people?
And in what context did you meet them? (Walk in patient, long standing patient, inmate etc..)

I'm fairly certain I have ASPD, I've wrote a post that should be up on here soon, I have justification for thinking this and it's come after a long time spent with mental health professionals.
I personally don't work with ASPD as my training is in anxiety and depression.
Your local community mental health team is likely the best place to discuss that diagnosis.
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raisahkxox
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Is this job similar to a psychiatrist? And do you know what route you could take to become one apart from going through medicine at uni first???
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