Unstudioustudent
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For background, I’m 16, starting my AS levels. I teach myself (home educated) so am flexible. Living in Northern Ireland. Am already doing a law a-level, but looking for alternative legal professional qualifications for several reasons:

• to put on my UCAS form - hoping to apply to an Oxbridge/Russell Group uni
• to allow me to be of more use to the barrister I work for as a part-time PA
• personal interest/career development

Was looking at these, but they’re mega expensive:
http://www.cilexlawschool.ac.uk/pros...w_and_practice

Can anyone advise? Much appreciated!
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ruthf
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(Original post by Unstudioustudent)
For background, I’m 16, starting my AS levels. I teach myself (home educated) so am flexible. Living in Northern Ireland. Am already doing a law a-level, but looking for alternative legal professional qualifications for several reasons:

• to put on my UCAS form - hoping to apply to an Oxbridge/Russell Group uni
• to allow me to be of more use to the barrister I work for as a part-time PA
• personal interest/career development

Was looking at these, but they’re mega expensive:
http://www.cilexlawschool.ac.uk/pros...w_and_practice

Can anyone advise? Much appreciated!
Hi, I’m off to Oxford for Law this October and I also had offers from LSE, UCL, King’s and Southampton.

By the sounds of things you already have things to put on your UCAS application in relation to your interest in law. Working for a barrister is a massive achievement - not something I had on my personal statement!

Honestly, it’s probably not worth it. Universities are certainly not looking for that or even expecting it at all. They are expensive as you’ve discovered and may take up a lot of time on top of the A-level stress.

My best advice is to read books like ‘Letters to a Law Student’, gain relevant work experience (which you’ve already done), and try and visit local courts if you can. Focus on your LNAT and your A-levels so that you can do the best you possibly can!
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Unstudioustudent
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(Original post by ruthflame57)
Hi, I’m off to Oxford for Law this October and I also had offers from LSE, UCL, King’s and Southampton.

By the sounds of things you already have things to put on your UCAS application in relation to your interest in law. Working for a barrister is a massive achievement - not something I had on my personal statement!

Honestly, it’s probably not worth it. Universities are certainly not looking for that or even expecting it at all. They are expensive as you’ve discovered and may take up a lot of time on top of the A-level stress.

My best advice is to read books like ‘Letters to a Law Student’, gain relevant work experience (which you’ve already done), and try and visit local courts if you can. Focus on your LNAT and your A-levels so that you can do the best you possibly can!
Wow, congrats, that’s amazing! If you don’t mind me asking, what grades did you get at GCSE and A-level? And how did you find the LNAT?

Really loving my job thanks, allows me to see what’s going on ‘behind the scenes’. Will also hopefully enable me to frequent the local courts, once I get the hang of my PA responsibilities lol. Have only been working for 4 weeks.
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ruthf
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(Original post by Unstudioustudent)
Wow, congrats, that’s amazing! If you don’t mind me asking, what grades did you get at GCSE and A-level? And how did you find the LNAT?

Really loving my job thanks, allows me to see what’s going on ‘behind the scenes’. Will also hopefully enable me to frequent the local courts, once I get the hang of my PA responsibilities lol. Have only been working for 4 weeks.
That will really make you stand out. It sounds like a really exciting job to have!

Thank you! So I’m the first person from my school to go to Oxbridge so I am by no means the most impressive person you’ll meet. At GCSE I got 3 A*s, 4 As, 4Bs, and 1 C. At A-level I got 3 A*s in Law, Psychology, and Sociology.

I found my LNAT okay. I think my exam went better than my practice papers had done. The cohort average for my year was about 19 and I got 29 which I was very happy with. I liked my essay and I think I chose a good topic. I honestly didn’t do very much preparation. LNAT books and tutoring tend to be a waste of money from what I’ve heard. LNAT doesn’t endorse that at all and they actually actively suggest not to waste your money on tutoring but I’m sure books that showcase similar skills may actually be useful. My biggest tip is not to compare yourself to the essays you see online. They are at a far higher standard than anyone of our age or experience would be expected to write (something I learnt from Letters to a Law Student) which really helped me to feel more confident. So if you’re reading them and thinking ‘I would never write that’ don’t worry! I was exactly the same.
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Unstudioustudent
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(Original post by ruthflame57)
That will really make you stand out. It sounds like a really exciting job to have!

Thank you! So I’m the first person from my school to go to Oxbridge so I am by no means the most impressive person you’ll meet. At GCSE I got 3 A*s, 4 As, 4Bs, and 1 C. At A-level I got 3 A*s in Law, Psychology, and Sociology.

I found my LNAT okay. I think my exam went better than my practice papers had done. The cohort average for my year was about 19 and I got 29 which I was very happy with. I liked my essay and I think I chose a good topic. I honestly didn’t do very much preparation. LNAT books and tutoring tend to be a waste of money from what I’ve heard. LNAT doesn’t endorse that at all and they actually actively suggest not to waste your money on tutoring but I’m sure books that showcase similar skills may actually be useful. My biggest tip is not to compare yourself to the essays you see online. They are at a far higher standard than anyone of our age or experience would be expected to write (something I learnt from Letters to a Law Student) which really helped me to feel more confident. So if you’re reading them and thinking ‘I would never write that’ don’t worry! I was exactly the same.
Yep have heard that about the LNAT - somewhat counterintuitive! Your score is awesome btw - some people are pleased with a 15!

I actually find your GCSE grades somewhat reassuring 😊 I got 9A*8AAAABBBB5E last month, and TSR was being pretty negative about my chances for Oxbridge - recommending Cambridge instead of Oxford, as apparently they’re less concerned about your GCSE grades. I’ve heard things about needing like 10+ A*s for Oxbridge floating around on TSR 🤯

Getting the E in IGCSE Latin remarked, and starting A-level Law, Politics, Biology, Accounting, and Business. Doing maths as well, but might not sit the exams - depends how AS goes.

What books do you recommend? I’ve seen a couple of people mentioning ‘Letters to a Law Student’ - gotta get a copy!
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ruthf
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(Original post by Unstudioustudent)
Yep have heard that about the LNAT - somewhat counterintuitive! Your score is awesome btw - some people are pleased with a 15!

I actually find your GCSE grades somewhat reassuring 😊 I got 9A*8AAAABBBB5E last month, and TSR was being pretty negative about my chances for Oxbridge - recommending Cambridge instead of Oxford, as apparently they’re less concerned about your GCSE grades. I’ve heard things about needing like 10+ A*s for Oxbridge floating around on TSR 🤯

Getting the E in IGCSE Latin remarked, and starting A-level Law, Politics, Biology, Accounting, and Business. Doing maths as well, but might not sit the exams - depends how AS goes.

What books do you recommend? I’ve seen a couple of people mentioning ‘Letters to a Law Student’ - gotta get a copy!
It’s just people being misinformed. Unless you’ve come from a top private/grammar school, they’re not necessarily expecting that from you!

‘Letters to a Law Student’ is a must! I also loved ‘What About Law?’ ‘The Law Machine’ is really good too and ‘Eve was Framed’ is interesting in terms of the history of women in the law. The Secret Barrister’s book is also fantastic but very upsetting when you consider the state of our legal system today!
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J Papi
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(Original post by Unstudioustudent)
For background, I’m 16, starting my AS levels. I teach myself (home educated) so am flexible. Living in Northern Ireland. Am already doing a law a-level, but looking for alternative legal professional qualifications for several reasons:

• to put on my UCAS form - hoping to apply to an Oxbridge/Russell Group uni
• to allow me to be of more use to the barrister I work for as a part-time PA
• personal interest/career development

Was looking at these, but they’re mega expensive:
http://www.cilexlawschool.ac.uk/pros...w_and_practice

Can anyone advise? Much appreciated!
What on earth is wrong with TSR these days - the European degree hoarding mentality seems to be seeping into it

You don't need any qualifications to apply to any taught law course in the UK. Even postgrad courses only ask for a law degree.

Dodgy qualifications like MOOC certificates should be used to show that you've bothered looking into a subject and that you studied it regularly when you had the chance, not as a primitive way of saying 'hey I'm qualified in subject Y'.

The P.S. has plenty of room for you to expand upon your more relevant interests - the w/e with a barrister can be mentioned somewhere (what did you learn from it that made you want to study law further?), as can any books you've read.
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Unstudioustudent
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(Original post by ruthflame57)
It’s just people being misinformed. Unless you’ve come from a top private/grammar school, they’re not necessarily expecting that from you!

‘Letters to a Law Student’ is a must! I also loved ‘What About Law?’ ‘The Law Machine’ is really good too and ‘Eve was Framed’ is interesting in terms of the history of women in the law. The Secret Barrister’s book is also fantastic but very upsetting when you consider the state of our legal system today!
Thanks for the reading list! Have seen a few of those titles on law personal statements on TSR 🙂
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Unstudioustudent
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
What on earth is wrong with TSR these days - the European degree hoarding mentality seems to be seeping into it

You don't need any qualifications to apply to any taught law course in the UK. Even postgrad courses only ask for a law degree.

Dodgy qualifications like MOOC certificates should be used to show that you've bothered looking into a subject and that you studied it regularly when you had the chance, not as a primitive way of saying 'hey I'm qualified in subject Y'.

The P.S. has plenty of room for you to expand upon your more relevant interests - the w/e with a barrister can be mentioned somewhere (what did you learn from it that made you want to study law further?), as can any books you've read.
Thanks for the advice 👍🏻

Hadn’t heard of that mentality before but now that you mention it..
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