elodie269
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Hey
I've heard that some students find Law Land quite tricky, and that in some institutions, around 25% of students fail this module.

I, however, want to do especially well in this module, since I want to eventually practice Chancery law at the Bar....This means, of course, that Land Law will be an essential topic to master!

Does anyone who has done very well in (i.e. gained a First) in Land Law modules have any top tips? Any very useful books to read, or essay writing tips (i.e. key observations, things to absolutely mention or research that many overlook, etc)?

Thank you, any tips are much appreciated.
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Bitesizelaw
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(Original post by Shellbeach)
Hey
I've heard that some students find Law Land quite tricky, and that in some institutions, around 25% of students fail this module.

I, however, want to do especially well in this module, since I want to eventually practice Chancery law at the Bar....This means, of course, that Land Law will be an essential topic to master!

Does anyone who has done very well in (i.e. gained a First) in Land Law modules have any top tips? Any very useful books to read, or essay writing tips (i.e. key observations, things to absolutely mention or research that many overlook, etc)?

Thank you, any tips are much appreciated.
There is no doubt that most students do find land law challenging at first. The terminology is different to anything you will have previously encountered. Keep slogging away at it. Don't expect to 'cram' at the last minute before the assessment and do well. Obviously the usual advice applies; attend lectures, prepare for (the most important point!) and participate in seminars, and consolidate your understanding as you go along. Students who listen to recorded lectures just before the assessment will not do as well as those who work steadily throughout the year.

So you can't take a selective approach to studying land law. You must take time to understand the basic principles. Ensure that you fully understand the difference between legal and equitable estates and interests, and how they affect a purchaser of the land.

Most courses involve 2 key parts: How you can acquire a right in land (e.g. a right of way over your neighbour's field which is an 'interest' known as an 'easement' AND whether new owners of the land can also claim to have the same right(s) a previous owner had.

Check to see if you can use a statute book in the exam. If so; use it when studying each topic. Make friends with LPA 1925, s.1.

There are lots of text books on land law. Some are very detailed; others are not. Many of them will be available electronically from your university library so try a few to see which ones suit you. There is no need to purchase a hard copy.

Some people like diagrames and charts in their textbook and there are many books which now include these. Others (myself included) prefer textbooks which include text and materials. First class students read primary materials (cases and statutes) so a good cases and materials book is a good investment (e.g. Roger Smith's Cases and Materials). Check your module reading list to see if your tutor has recommended a particuar one.

Finally,expect to be confused at first! This is normal, but don't give up. Behave like a first class student from the outset by realising that the majority of work is down to you. Don't rely soley on lecture notes and 'taught' materials. Read, read and read again until you understand.
Land law is actually quite logical once you get your head around it.
Good luck.

Amanda Grant a.k.a. Bitesizelaw - private land law tutor
https://www.linkedin.com/in/amanda-grant-bitesizelaw/
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elodie269
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(Original post by Bitesizelaw)
So you can't take a selective approach to studying land law. You must take time to understand the basic principles. Ensure that you fully understand the difference between legal and equitable estates and interests, and how they affect a purchaser of the land.

Finally,expect to be confused at first! This is normal, but don't give up. Behave like a first class student from the outset by realising that the majority of work is down to you. Don't rely soley on lecture notes and 'taught' materials. Read, read and read again until you understand.
Land law is actually quite logical once you get your head around it.
Good luck.
This is incredibly useful, thank you!

What is your background, if you don't mind my asking? I.e. LLB student, lawyer, law professor?
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Bitesizelaw
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(Original post by Shellbeach)
This is incredibly useful, thank you!

What is your background, if you don't mind my asking? I.e. LLB student, lawyer, law professor?
I was a law lecturer for 25 years . I'm now a private tutor for land law in Leicester
Last edited by Bitesizelaw; 1 year ago
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Mimir
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Tab your statue book strategically. Learn your relevant case law.

Learn the pervasive topics thoroughly, appreciate there is a process/structure to each question. Remember to keep everything in context, you can't understand the area by knowing tit-bits of law alone.
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Bitesizelaw
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(Original post by Mimir)
Tab your statue book strategically. Learn your relevant case law.

Learn the pervasive topics thoroughly, appreciate there is a process/structure to each question. Remember to keep everything in context, you can't understand the area by knowing tit-bits of law alone.
Just remember to check your uni's rules on the use of 'tabs' (or any other annotations) in statute books in the exam. It might be prohibited. If not; it's an excellent idea.

Totally agree with Mimir that land law isn't just about s.1, but it's a good start! Make sure you get to grips with the difference between legal and equitable interests as it one of the building blocks to help you understand land law.
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