shareknowledge
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Hi everyone,

I have been really thinking about becoming a dermatologist/doctor/GP although I have no idea what steps I have to take/what I have to study to get there as it’s all abit overwhelming. Do I have to go to college and do my A levels first and which A levels do I take? Sorry if it sounds like a stupid question but I really have no idea where to start. Thanks for reading and also thanks for any help in advance!
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shareknowledge
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(Original post by Volibear)
You need to study medicine. A-levels are the typical first step for getting there. Biology, Chemistry and whatever other subject you can do well in (except for General Studies, Critical Thinking, or a language you're already fluent in).
Thank you for your help!
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Democracy
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(Original post by shareknowledge)
Hi everyone,

I have been really thinking about becoming a dermatologist/doctor/GP although I have no idea what steps I have to take/what I have to study to get there as it’s all abit overwhelming. Do I have to go to college and do my A levels first and which A levels do I take? Sorry if it sounds like a stupid question but I really have no idea where to start. Thanks for reading and also thanks for any help in advance!
Medical school (4-6 years), Foundation Programme (2 years), Internal Medicine Training (3 years), pass the MRCP, get into dermatology specialty training (4 years), complete specialty training, enjoy that sweet, sweet derm life.

Dermatology is really competitive btw, so you would need to do all sorts of extra CV things along the way as a med student and junior doctor to increase your chances of getting a specialty training position.

More info here:

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...nd-development

https://www.medschools.ac.uk/media/2...al-schools.pdf

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Medicine
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Asklepios
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(Original post by Democracy)
Medical school (4-6 years), Foundation Programme (2 years), Internal Medicine Training (3 years), pass the MRCP, get into dermatology specialty training (4 years), complete specialty training, enjoy that sweet, sweet derm life.

Dermatology is really competitive btw, so you would need to do all sorts of extra CV things along the way as a med student and junior doctor to increase your chances of getting a specialty training position.

More info here:

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...nd-development

https://www.medschools.ac.uk/media/2...al-schools.pdf

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Medicine
For derm, I think you don't need to do the third year of IMT! https://www.jrcptb.org.uk/new-intern...ine-curriculum (look at the bit at the bottom when it talks about group 1 and group 2 specialties).
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Democracy
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(Original post by Asklepios)
For derm, I think you don't need to do the third year of IMT! https://www.jrcptb.org.uk/new-intern...ine-curriculum (look at the bit at the bottom when it talks about group 1 and group 2 specialties).
Oh whoops, you're completely right. Which makes it all the more sweet ofc
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shareknowledge
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(Original post by Democracy)
Medical school (4-6 years), Foundation Programme (2 years), Internal Medicine Training (3 years), pass the MRCP, get into dermatology specialty training (4 years), complete specialty training, enjoy that sweet, sweet derm life.

Dermatology is really competitive btw, so you would need to do all sorts of extra CV things along the way as a med student and junior doctor to increase your chances of getting a specialty training position.

More info here:

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...nd-development

https://www.medschools.ac.uk/media/2...al-schools.pdf

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Medicine
Thank you for your advice and all the helpful links, I really appreciate it! In terms of doing my A levels, which would be the best way to do it? I’ve seen other people mention an access course which gets the A levels done in 1 year instead of 2 but I’m not sure? Or is there a foundation year at uni where you do your A levels before starting medicine? Or there’s an option of doing A levels online? Not sure which path to take with it all x
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Democracy
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(Original post by shareknowledge)
Thank you for your advice and all the helpful links, I really appreciate it! In terms of doing my A levels, which would be the best way to do it? I’ve seen other people mention an access course which gets the A levels done in 1 year instead of 2 but I’m not sure? Or is there a foundation year at uni where you do your A levels before starting medicine? Or there’s an option of doing A levels online? Not sure which path to take with it all x
What stage are you at now? Are you in year 11?
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shareknowledge
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(Original post by Democracy)
What stage are you at now? Are you in year 11?
No I’m 20, did 1 year at college doing beauty after school. I have GCSE Grade C in English & Maths and Grade B in science.
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