Swedish election thread

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Davij038
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It’s Sweden’s general election tomorrow, which should be a very interesting perhaps even pivotal moment for the country and Europe as a whole.

The social democrats which for a hundred years has been the biggest party in Sweden is still set to win the highest number of votes but at its lowest share of the vote in history at a mere 25%

The ‘far right’ Sweden democrats are set to take Second place and like in Germany are likely to become the official opposition as more mai stream parties refuse to work with them. For the last three elections try have subsequently doubled their share of the vote.

* * *

My take:

Sweden appears to be reacting very much in the same way as Germany where all establishment parties refuse to work with the ‘far right’ and as they use PR voting method, try and lock them out of government. However if by some miracle the Sweden democrats do win. It is unlikely that the centre right moderates will form a grand coalition with the social democrats (and that would certainly not help them in the long run)

Also of note, the far left ‘The Left’ party is also showing signs of growth. Like Germany and also the US the ‘extremes’ are growing with widespread dissatisfaction or hatred of establishment liberal parties.
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ChaoticButterfly
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We also take a moment to appreciate that the UK Labour Party is the only European social democratic party not hemorrhaging support.
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Davij038
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
We also take a moment to appreciate that the UK Labour Party is the only European social democratic party not hemorrhaging support.
That’s another interesting take and sort of a larger trend. But as I said in my last paragraph. That is due to labour being taken over by a more radical force.

Bit I would also say say that this has made it a target for the same people who attack and demonise the ‘far right’ : certainly not to the same extent but I think that it is worth noting.

oh and labour has rapidly lost the support of one group of voters too 😉
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Davij038)
It’s Sweden’s general election tomorrow, which should be a very interesting perhaps even pivotal moment for the country and Europe as a whole.

The social democrats which for a hundred years has been the biggest party in Sweden is still set to win the highest number of votes but at its lowest share of the vote in history at a mere 25%

The ‘far right’ Sweden democrats are set to take Second place and like in Germany are likely to become the official opposition as more mai stream parties refuse to work with them. For the last three elections try have subsequently doubled their share of the vote.

* * *

My take:

Sweden appears to be reacting very much in the same way as Germany where all establishment parties refuse to work with the ‘far right’ and as they use PR voting method, try and lock them out of government. However if by some miracle the Sweden democrats do win. It is unlikely that the centre right moderates will form a grand coalition with the social democrats (and that would certainly not help them in the long run)

Also of note, the far left ‘The Left’ party is also showing signs of growth. Like Germany and also the US the ‘extremes’ are growing with widespread dissatisfaction or hatred of establishment liberal parties.
Despite the whaffle about not working with them the reality is that they will, simply by renewing the current coalition but with more leverage for the smaller partners.
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Davij038
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Despite the whaffle about not working with them the reality is that they will, simply by renewing the current coalition but with more leverage for the smaller partners.
Hey good to see you, thought you got banned or something! 😂

Ay? I highly doubt the red- green coalition will work with them even if they become the largest party. Unless you count making concessions to stop things getting voted down as working with them. Which isn’t working with them but being realistic in order to govern.

By working with them I mean a formal coalition or confidence deal.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Davij038)
Hey good to see you, thought you got banned or something! 😂

Ay? I highly doubt the red- green coalition will work with them even if they become the largest party. Unless you count making concessions to stop things getting voted down as working with them. Which isn’t working with them but being realistic in order to govern.

By working with them I mean a formal coalition or confidence deal.
They have been in formal coalition for the last few years. Power>Principles.
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Davij038
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(Original post by Rakas21)
They have been in formal coalition for the last few years.
The Sweden democrats???

If so this is news to me and has not been reported anywhere, where are you getting this from?
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by Davij038)
That’s another interesting take and sort of a larger trend. But as I said in my last paragraph. That is due to labour being taken over by a more radical force.
because of not despite of.

The labour moderates would do well to look at thier european sister parties to see the fate of UK Labour were someone like Evette Cooper in charge. Despite claims Labour would be 20 pts ahead.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
because of not despite of.

The labour moderates would do well to look at thier european sister parties to see the fate of UK Labour were someone like Evette Cooper in charge. Despite claims Labour would be 20 pts ahead.
I think your both wrong right and wrong here. Being different was beneficial but i think hitting 40% had more to do with anti-Tory/anti-sentiment than being avidly socialist. That combined with the Lib Dem's and Kippers becoming irrelevant.

Lab would not be 20 points ahead under any leader though, two party politics has returned. For comparable elections your looking at the 45-70 period.

(Original post by Davij038)
The Sweden democrats???

If so this is news to me and has not been reported anywhere, where are you getting this from?
I have just checked, it would appear at some stage i payed so little attention that i misread. Ha.
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Davij038
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
because of not despite of.

The labour moderates would do well to look at thier european sister parties to see the fate of UK Labour were someone like Evette Cooper in charge. Despite claims Labour would be 20 pts ahead.
It kinda depends. I certainly agree that labour would be in a worse position if Yvette cooper was in charge.

The only two feasible candidates in the first labour leadership contest was Corbyn and Kendall. I think Kendall would be doing better than Corbyn would now personally. That said I think labour is in the long run doomed for the same reason that the democrat party in the US is. So whilst electing radical leftists or appealing moderates may stem the inevitable or even win some ground- in the long term I think it’s futile:

i think the best hope for the left is allying with the alt right insurgency as perverse as it sounds- this may be happening in France with Melenchon and Le-Pen or in some ways Italy.
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qwertyK
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The liberals will fail and they should fail. Sweden has become a sh*thole with mass immigration. It's a shame a party like the ones in Europe don't exist in the UK. The Sweden Democrats need to win for the Swedish people!
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Being different was beneficial but i think hitting 40% had more to do with anti-Tory/anti-sentiment than being avidly socialist.
Yes and how would a Labour leadership that was constantly giving ground to the Tories and offering the same or at best Tory-lite appeal to anti tory sentiment? There would just be a piss poor depressed labour vote. No Momentum style actavism to get the vote out, get none voters to vote and get the young to vote.

Remember how just before Corbyn was elected leader and the stand in leadership thought it was a good idea to abstain against that welfare bill. Yeah that's is what labour would be looking like now if anyone other than Corbyn won. Which is why he did win obviously. The old guard were no longer delivering the goods in terms of winning elections, combined with complte compitulation to the right wing austerity narrative post 2008 crash and it is obviouse that majority of the labour party outside the PLP and right wing strongholds in the party beaucracy were going to vote for Corybyn.
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Davij038
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(Original post by qwertyK)
The liberals will fail and they should fail. Sweden has become a sh*thole with mass immigration. It's a shame a party like the ones in Europe don't exist in the UK. The Sweden Democrats need to win for the Swedish people!
Strongly agree. It’s for this reason only that I support PR as opposed to first pass the post.
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Davij038
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Slightly disappointing result, I’d hoped the sweden democrats would make at least 20% but at least they’ve gained an additional five percent and are still the big winners.

The biggest losers are both the main parties and the social democrats coalition partners the greens. Both main factions are more or less equal.

Also of note: the ‘radical centrist’ centrist party had a good night also, as well as the Christian democrats and the far left Left party. So whilst nationalists are seeing the biggest increase, we are also getting an increase not only in the far left but also the ‘radical’ centre
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Davij038
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It would be good iif the moderates and Christian Democrats did a confidence deal with the Swedish democrats.

Alternatively, the moderates and social democrats may do a grand coalition to keep the Sweden democrats out which is what their current prime minister is now advocating for. This would also make the Nationalists the official opposition as is the case in Germany.

Either one works for me, 👍🏻
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