I'm a recovered anorexic. Ask me anything! Watch

lydiarutharnold
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How are you at the moment?
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mysticalfluffy
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(Original post by Trust Orang)
Do you get upset when people make jokes about eating disorders?
I haven’t encountered many people joking about eating disorders, but I doubt it’d upset me unless it was said with hostility/to make me feel uncomfortable, or unless it demeaned the suffering experienced by people with these conditions.

I think, while recovering, I came to appreciate that while I disliked certain comments, I couldn’t ask the world to change on my behalf. It’s made me think a lot about the way people, especially people in the US, are overusing terms such as “trigger”, “gaslighting” and calling for “safe spaces.” It’s such a privilege to lead a life where nothing offends you, I’m not sure it’s possible unless you oppress others. Obviously we can demand basic kindness and respect, but I wouldn’t want to police things people say. I’d rather talk to them if I found something grossly distasteful. No one ever achieved anything by hurling abuse at someone who says something they don’t like.
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Trust Orang
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(Original post by mysticalfluffy)
I haven’t encountered many people joking about eating disorders, but I doubt it’d upset me unless it was said with hostility/to make me feel uncomfortable, or unless it demeaned the suffering experienced by people with these conditions.

I think, while recovering, I came to appreciate that while I disliked certain comments, I couldn’t ask the world to change on my behalf. It’s made me think a lot about the way people, especially people in the US, are overusing terms such as “trigger”, “gaslighting” and calling for “safe spaces.” It’s such a privilege to lead a life where nothing offends you, I’m not sure it’s possible unless you oppress others. Obviously we can demand basic kindness and respect, but I wouldn’t want to police things people say. I’d rather talk to them if I found something grossly distasteful. No one ever achieved anything by hurling abuse at someone who says something they don’t like.
10/10 answer actually, thanks!
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mysticalfluffy
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(Original post by lydiarutharnold)
How are you at the moment?

Thanks for asking this. I’m well emotionally. I’m prone to anxiety, still very sensitive (though not to comments about my body necessarily, just in general). I’m shy and often withdrawn. I am actually okay with all these things though. Sometimes I feel like someone who has gone through trauma. I’m happy with my small group of friends who know me well, with my husband who is my best friend and the best person I ever met. I’m more empathetic now than I was before.

I have some health issues which remained after my body and mind recovered: Raynaud's syndrome, eye floaters (many of them), a sensitive stomach. My hair is thinner than it used to be. Occasionally, I do feel like my mental state does affect my body more than it does most people—I feel my body tense up a lot, I get heart palpitations. Psychosomatic illness is real, and my mind definitely wants to manifest its current state in my body from time to time.

I spend a lot of my time reading and writing. I love learning new things. Occasionally I sink into a depression, but I know nothing lasts forever.

I’m usually happier than most people I think, and freer. I have a dream job and do it because I want to do it, not because someone told me to. I don’t allow anyone to exert pressure on me to be a certain way anymore. I’ve relaxed a lot about perfectionism, though that’s still there, and I channel it into my work. I work really hard.

I am thinking about having children soon, which will be a huge leap. So overall, normal life resumes—definitely more introverted than most others. And more independent. Destined to be a crazy cat lady.
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lydiarutharnold
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(Original post by mysticalfluffy)
Thanks for asking this. I’m well emotionally. I’m prone to anxiety, still very sensitive (though not to comments about my body necessarily, just in general). I’m shy and often withdrawn. I am actually okay with all these things though. Sometimes I feel like someone who has gone through trauma. I’m happy with my small group of friends who know me well, with my husband who is my best friend and the best person I ever met. I’m more empathetic now than I was before.

I have some health issues which remained after my body and mind recovered: Raynaud's syndrome, eye floaters (many of them), a sensitive stomach. My hair is thinner than it used to be. Occasionally, I do feel like my mental state does affect my body more than it does most people—I feel my body tense up a lot, I get heart palpitations. Psychosomatic illness is real, and my mind definitely wants to manifest its current state in my body from time to time.

I spend a lot of my time reading and writing. I love learning new things. Occasionally I sink into a depression, but I know nothing lasts forever.

I’m usually happier than most people I think, and freer. I have a dream job and do it because I want to do it, not because someone told me to. I don’t allow anyone to exert pressure on me to be a certain way anymore. I’ve relaxed a lot about perfectionism, though that’s still there, and I channel it into my work. I work really hard.

I am thinking about having children soon, which will be a huge leap. So overall, normal life resumes—definitely more introverted than most others. And more independent. Destined to be a crazy cat lady.
Wow . I’m glad you are well emotionally + I am so proud of how well you have recovered )

I’m sorry you have to go through various health conditions after your recovery and hope you are able to be relieved from them one day (

But I am glad you are not just alive but you are living- you have your dream job and that’s blooming brill ) and I wish you and your husband the best with having children )
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Quantum_of_Hope
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(Original post by mysticalfluffy)
Sorry to hear you’re still in that place, but I’m glad to hear you want to recover! That’s the most important thing when it comes to recovery. I re-read my journal from around that time. For many years I wrote things like, “this makes me want to survive,” or “I need to stop thinking this way.” If I hadn’t wanted desperately to get over it, I might never have done so. You need to find a will to carry on. Mine has become writing. I want people to read what I have to say. I want to fight for things I care about.

It takes a long time to break bad habits, even more so when you’re not entirely sure what caused them in the first place.

Try and do some digging, though when hungry it’s difficult to make rational sense of your life. Why are you here? Why are you doing this? Do you want to disappear? Is this for you a demonstration or your willpower? A measured suicide?

You need to find a new coping mechanism and move towards that. It can also help to find yourself in a new space. I went to university, and it was then that I started to recover (though it took many years). I had a new goal which was not to lose weight and disappear—I wanted a first class degree and I wanted to be successful. Anorexia is associated with perfectionism; you need to channel your perfectionism into something else. I knew that I couldn’t excel in academia while hungry. My A-Levels went badly as I couldn’t concentrate. I was also forced to take a lot of time out of school when my weight was at its lowest.

You also need to try (with time) to rewire your thinking about food. It is not a coping mechanism to overeat or indulge—it’s first and foremost fuel, something we need to survive.

During recovery, at first I found that this thinking led to a new form of disordered eating—I thought things like “2 brazil nuts for this nutrient, 1/4 of an avocado for this nutrient” etc. You need to be aware of the many traps your disordered mind will set for itself.

I then found myself overcompensating with food, and overeating for a while. This made me utterly depressed. I think the best thing I have done for myself is sticking largely to a wholefoods diet—meaning you can eat anything regularly so long as you made it/it’s homecooked and not overly processed. With time, this kind of eating has allowed me to eat intuitively again. I know when I’m satisfied, I don’t eat to bursting point, I allow myself indulgences. Restricting leads to binging. I’ve become something of a foodie—I don’t overindulge, I still have my little rituals (I think some ritualistic is healthy, as I don’t snack mindlessly). I will make time for a coffee and some cake/ a biscuit if I feel like it. I might have wine or some supper late at night. I prefer quality over quantity. At the same time, I’m flexible. If I’m travelling and the only vegetarian thing to eat is a bad looking sandwich, I’ll eat it. This kind of thinking takes a long time to achieve. For many years I still had some form of restrictive diet. I’d still count calories (if you do this, stop, this is out of control thinking), or say “you can have this, but not this.” If you’re reading menus and the ingredients of food packages, chances are you’re hungry so allow yourself to eat.

It’s true that yoga is good for recovering anorexics. It makes you appreciate your body. You come to realise where it’s hurting (you can feel that on your mat), you come to know where you could do with more flesh, more muscle. You feel more present in this vessel, the only one you’ve got while you live on this planet, you come to realise you need to treat it well if you are to make the most of your time here

I now view anorexia as something akin to a daemon, it’s another part of myself. It preys on me when I’m vulnerable when I’m stressed or depressed. But that awareness is life-saving, as awareness means you’re the one in control, not it.

It’s not easy, but it’s achievable. I wish you all the best, and I hope one day you’ll look back at where you are now and think, “thank goodness that nightmare is over.” When you’ve walked through a dark tunnel, freedom feels sweet. When recovering, I was hyperaware and emotional where before I’d be cold. I’d cry during films. I’d take a walk along a promenade overlooking the sea and feel something difficult to explain, a certain gratitude or oneness with the world. I often feel like I’m living at the edge, conscious of mortality, and that makes living all the sweeter. With a healthy body and a healthy mind, the world is your oyster. Time to go out and see what’s waiting for you.
Hi, thank you so much for your reply It really helps to have advice from someone who has been through a similar experience, rather than medical 'experts' who claim to understand this illness! They clearly do not understand because even I do not understand this myself! Anorexia certainly makes no logical sense, and I guess that's one of the things that makes it hard to escape from it. No rational explanation will satisfy the anorexia!

I completely agree - you have to want to recover for it to be effective. When I was forced into recovery by the ED service 6 years ago, they only focused on my weight and did not care about the mental aspect of it at all, hence I never actually recovered under their 'care'. I've also found that you need quite a few incentives to recover. Although the long-term physical consequences of anorexia are terrifying, for some reason it is not enough to make me want to recover. Hence going back to Imperial to study Physics is my main incentive.

I agree with what you said about yoga - it definitely helps Do you have any recommendations on other coping mechanisms? Thanks
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mysticalfluffy
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(Original post by Quantum_of_Hope)
Hi, thank you so much for your reply It really helps to have advice from someone who has been through a similar experience, rather than medical 'experts' who claim to understand this illness! They clearly do not understand because even I do not understand this myself! Anorexia certainly makes no logical sense, and I guess that's one of the things that makes it hard to escape from it. No rational explanation will satisfy the anorexia!

I completely agree - you have to want to recover for it to be effective. When I was forced into recovery by the ED service 6 years ago, they only focused on my weight and did not care about the mental aspect of it at all, hence I never actually recovered under their 'care'. I've also found that you need quite a few incentives to recover. Although the long-term physical consequences of anorexia are terrifying, for some reason it is not enough to make me want to recover. Hence going back to Imperial to study Physics is my main incentive.

I agree with what you said about yoga - it definitely helps Do you have any recommendations on other coping mechanisms? Thanks

It’s really hard, I’m not going to lie.

I remember crying and telling my physician I just wanted to die. That I didn’t want to recover, nor lose weight. I wanted to die.

I kept being told, when you recover, the depression will resolve itself. I was assured that if it wasn’t, I would receive support.

I recovered (physically) and I was struggling. I went to visit a new doctor in my university town, who said (when I was recovering, and my weight had not yet distributed itself well): “well you look fine now.” It was the most gut-wrenching thing ever. I was utterly depressed. I relapsed briefly, lost some weight again, and then stabilised.

I think it’s good to be aware that many people don’t know what anorexia is, that it’s an internal struggle first and foremost. Initially, I wished I still wore my mental health issue on my skin, or lack of it, I was clearly sick, no one doubted it. But when I was recovering and had gained weight, I felt utterly alone.

This might sound demotivating, but it’s the hardest bit. You have to come to terms with the underlying thoughts. You have to come to terms with not looking sick, and acquiring a healthy mind to fit your new healthy body.

It’s helpful to think about all the things you can do when healthy. When unhealthy (and anorexic), you can’t enjoy a weekend in Paris. For the anorexia sufferer, a weekend in Paris means a weekend avoiding food—looking into pastry cabinets with a mix of lust and repulsion. Try to put that into perspective. Is that really the way you want to spend your days? There is more to Paris than struggling with what you can or can’t eat. There are the beautiful gardens of Versailles. The bookshops. The cobblestoned streets of Montmartre. The museums. There’s Disneyland Paris.

If you’re anorexic, you can’t walk up a mountain. Or you can (if the walk is not too strenuous), but you can’t enjoy it. You see it as a means to an end.

I think this article is really interesting: https://www.theguardian.com/society/...grow-out-of-it

Studies and observations from these neuroscientists observe that anorexic people have brains that are wired differently. Anorexic people are more sensitive to punishment than most people, and respond differently to rewards.

This is what we do when we starve. We put delay gratification. We think of end goals. It’s how we can starve ourselves to death.

This might sound like disordered thinking, and it can be, but there’s a possibility it’s hardwired into our brains.

That doesn’t mean everything is lost for us. In fact, this ability to postpone gratification, this positive response to punishment, means we are able to push through punitive things (revising for tests, endurance runs etc) and reach our goals. We’re more goal focused, and less likely to succumb to procrastination, which likely wouldn’t be much fun for us anyway.

If you can channel this into something else, it really means the world is your oyster. I’m not saying it won’t ever be distressing—it’s a perfectionist tendency, and perfectionism doesn’t respond well to failure. If we strive for something difficult to attain, e.g. a dream job, we will face many hurdles and rejections along the way.

I’ve come to find this a lot more rewarding than I found anorexia, and it satisfies the same thought process. I would even go as far to say it’s healthy. I’m now doing well in my field, and I’ve noticed many other people around me who are high achievers share these qualities. They are determined and push through adversity in ways others can’t. We’re resilient—we have tortured ourselves—now time to instead use our brains for something good.

When you’re hungry, you forget who you are. When you’re recovering, you forget who you were. Thinness comes to define you, as it’s the success you strove for for so many years.

The good thing is, personality is somewhat flexible. Look at someone like David Bowie, he went through many incarnations and was always successful.

While certain things stay with us, we can work with what we have.

Who would you like to be? What would you like to do? If you know it’s going to be hard to get there, you can take pleasure in knowing nothing will be as hard as it was to starve yourself—nothing was as hard as it was to recover.

With time, the disordered eating goes away. It helps to make circumstantial changes, if necessary. Are you in a bad job? A bad relationship? Are you not happy about where your life is taking you?

You absolutely need to find a new mission. Personally, I become quite obsessed about completing a certain task, and get immense satisfaction from doing so. I once had that with anorexia, though with time the “successes” became failures, because starving yourself will never make you happy long-term.

Also, don’t worry about becoming an overeater, a compulsive eater etc. If you work on rebuilding yourself as a person, on creating a new sense of “I am” and developing new interests, a new mission in life, the world is truly your oyster. In essence, that’s your coping mechanism, finding a new life goal.

Note: one of my relapses occurerd when I graduated. All my new meaning had been pulled from under my feet, and the world felt empty. It’s good to be prepared for these changes, to think hard about what you’re aiming at next.

In all honesty, I love where I am now. I feel so excited every time I meet the next career hurdle, and I work in a field where I’ll unlikely ever plateau.

Another huge coping mechanism is reading. I think of it as the best cure to existential depression. I read about 100 books a year, and many personal essays. It’s interesting to know how other minds work, to avoid common pitfalls yourself. It’s a good way of reminding yourself that you can enjoy life, despite it not often making sense.

Let me know if you want to keep chatting. I can share my email via PM. I know I could have done with support when recovering.
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Quantum_of_Hope
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(Original post by mysticalfluffy)
It’s really hard, I’m not going to lie.

I remember crying and telling my physician I just wanted to die. That I didn’t want to recover, nor lose weight. I wanted to die.

I kept being told, when you recover, the depression will resolve itself. I was assured that if it wasn’t, I would receive support.

I recovered (physically) and I was struggling. I went to visit a new doctor in my university town, who said (when I was recovering, and my weight had not yet distributed itself well): “well you look fine now.” It was the most gut-wrenching thing ever. I was utterly depressed. I relapsed briefly, lost some weight again, and then stabilised.

I think it’s good to be aware that many people don’t know what anorexia is, that it’s an internal struggle first and foremost. Initially, I wished I still wore my mental health issue on my skin, or lack of it, I was clearly sick, no one doubted it. But when I was recovering and had gained weight, I felt utterly alone.

This might sound demotivating, but it’s the hardest bit. You have to come to terms with the underlying thoughts. You have to come to terms with not looking sick, and acquiring a healthy mind to fit your new healthy body.

It’s helpful to think about all the things you can do when healthy. When unhealthy (and anorexic), you can’t enjoy a weekend in Paris. For the anorexia sufferer, a weekend in Paris means a weekend avoiding food—looking into pastry cabinets with a mix of lust and repulsion. Try to put that into perspective. Is that really the way you want to spend your days? There is more to Paris than struggling with what you can or can’t eat. There are the beautiful gardens of Versailles. The bookshops. The cobblestoned streets of Montmartre. The museums. There’s Disneyland Paris.

If you’re anorexic, you can’t walk up a mountain. Or you can (if the walk is not too strenuous), but you can’t enjoy it. You see it as a means to an end.

I think this article is really interesting: https://www.theguardian.com/society/...grow-out-of-it

Studies and observations from these neuroscientists observe that anorexic people have brains that are wired differently. Anorexic people are more sensitive to punishment than most people, and respond differently to rewards.

This is what we do when we starve. We put delay gratification. We think of end goals. It’s how we can starve ourselves to death.

This might sound like disordered thinking, and it can be, but there’s a possibility it’s hardwired into our brains.

That doesn’t mean everything is lost for us. In fact, this ability to postpone gratification, this positive response to punishment, means we are able to push through punitive things (revising for tests, endurance runs etc) and reach our goals. We’re more goal focused, and less likely to succumb to procrastination, which likely wouldn’t be much fun for us anyway.

If you can channel this into something else, it really means the world is your oyster. I’m not saying it won’t ever be distressing—it’s a perfectionist tendency, and perfectionism doesn’t respond well to failure. If we strive for something difficult to attain, e.g. a dream job, we will face many hurdles and rejections along the way.

I’ve come to find this a lot more rewarding than I found anorexia, and it satisfies the same thought process. I would even go as far to say it’s healthy. I’m now doing well in my field, and I’ve noticed many other people around me who are high achievers share these qualities. They are determined and push through adversity in ways others can’t. We’re resilient—we have tortured ourselves—now time to instead use our brains for something good.

When you’re hungry, you forget who you are. When you’re recovering, you forget who you were. Thinness comes to define you, as it’s the success you strove for for so many years.

The good thing is, personality is somewhat flexible. Look at someone like David Bowie, he went through many incarnations and was always successful.

While certain things stay with us, we can work with what we have.

Who would you like to be? What would you like to do? If you know it’s going to be hard to get there, you can take pleasure in knowing nothing will be as hard as it was to starve yourself—nothing was as hard as it was to recover.

With time, the disordered eating goes away. It helps to make circumstantial changes, if necessary. Are you in a bad job? A bad relationship? Are you not happy about where your life is taking you?

You absolutely need to find a new mission. Personally, I become quite obsessed about completing a certain task, and get immense satisfaction from doing so. I once had that with anorexia, though with time the “successes” became failures, because starving yourself will never make you happy long-term.

Also, don’t worry about becoming an overeater, a compulsive eater etc. If you work on rebuilding yourself as a person, on creating a new sense of “I am” and developing new interests, a new mission in life, the world is truly your oyster. In essence, that’s your coping mechanism, finding a new life goal.

Note: one of my relapses occurerd when I graduated. All my new meaning had been pulled from under my feet, and the world felt empty. It’s good to be prepared for these changes, to think hard about what you’re aiming at next.

In all honesty, I love where I am now. I feel so excited every time I meet the next career hurdle, and I work in a field where I’ll unlikely ever plateau.

Another huge coping mechanism is reading. I think of it as the best cure to existential depression. I read about 100 books a year, and many personal essays. It’s interesting to know how other minds work, to avoid common pitfalls yourself. It’s a good way of reminding yourself that you can enjoy life, despite it not often making sense.

Let me know if you want to keep chatting. I can share my email via PM. I know I could have done with support when recovering.
I really appreciate that you put the time and effort in to replying to my message Reading your experience and journey makes me feel so hopeful for the future. I completely agree with everything that you've said. Also, the article you linked is very interesting and was well worth reading!

Anorexia is definitely used as a coping mechanism by hard-working perfectionists (and it is a very unhelpful, dangerous coping mechanism). I like your alternative coping mechanism - career/academia goals are definitely healthier and more worthwhile and fulfilling than an eating disorder can ever be. Anorexia is never satisfied no matter how little you eat or how low your weight is. It never leads to happiness and everything about it is a lie.

The guilt after eating is horrendous but I tell myself that it's the anorexia fighting back because part of the anorexia is 'dying'.

"When you 'lose' at anorexia, you win at life." - This is currently one of my favourite quotes. Depression and anorexia are intertwined and I feel like in order to be truly happy, it means letting go of the eating disorder, no matter how difficult it is.

The thing is, I want to recover, and I'm trying so hard, but it doesn't feel like it's getting an easier. The guilt is still horrible and I struggle a lot with body image. I also still have a fear of gaining weight and not looking ill. It makes no sense that I want people to look at me and think I'm anorexic. Why do I want anorexia to define me? I don't know. And I don't think I even want it to anymore.

Also, my body seems to react badly when I give it food. I get painful cramps after eating and feel ill sometimes hours afterwards. Is this only the case in the early stages of recovery? I hope it gets easier and less painful (both physically and mentally). It could be because I have a high-fibre diet though because I am vegan.

If you don't mind me asking:
1. Which university did you go to?
2. What steps did you take to achieve the career you currently have?

I'm due to start university in a couple of weeks to study Physics. (This will be my second time doing 1st year thanks to anorexia).

Thank you so much Also, I am more than happy to keep chatting, as long as you don't mind!
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mysticalfluffy
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(Original post by Quantum_of_Hope)
I really appreciate that you put the time and effort in to replying to my message Reading your experience and journey makes me feel so hopeful for the future. I completely agree with everything that you've said. Also, the article you linked is very interesting and was well worth reading!

Anorexia is definitely used as a coping mechanism by hard-working perfectionists (and it is a very unhelpful, dangerous coping mechanism). I like your alternative coping mechanism - career/academia goals are definitely healthier and more worthwhile and fulfilling than an eating disorder can ever be. Anorexia is never satisfied no matter how little you eat or how low your weight is. It never leads to happiness and everything about it is a lie.

The guilt after eating is horrendous but I tell myself that it's the anorexia fighting back because part of the anorexia is 'dying'.

"When you 'lose' at anorexia, you win at life." - This is currently one of my favourite quotes. Depression and anorexia are intertwined and I feel like in order to be truly happy, it means letting go of the eating disorder, no matter how difficult it is.

The thing is, I want to recover, and I'm trying so hard, but it doesn't feel like it's getting an easier. The guilt is still horrible and I struggle a lot with body image. I also still have a fear of gaining weight and not looking ill. It makes no sense that I want people to look at me and think I'm anorexic. Why do I want anorexia to define me? I don't know. And I don't think I even want it to anymore.

Also, my body seems to react badly when I give it food. I get painful cramps after eating and feel ill sometimes hours afterwards. Is this only the case in the early stages of recovery? I hope it gets easier and less painful (both physically and mentally). It could be because I have a high-fibre diet though because I am vegan.

If you don't mind me asking:
1. Which university did you go to?
2. What steps did you take to achieve the career you currently have?

I'm due to start university in a couple of weeks to study Physics. (This will be my second time doing 1st year thanks to anorexia).

Thank you so much Also, I am more than happy to keep chatting, as long as you don't mind!
It’s okay, I’m a fast writer :P And I find writing quite cathartic.

Of course.
  1. I went to the University of Edinburgh.
  2. I looked at people who I admired and saw how they got to where they are now. I read memoirs, biographies, interviews. I keep reading. I don’t want to be them, I want to be myself, but in order to speed up the process, it helped to see what others tried. You learn that for most people (at least contemporary successes), getting where you want entails following a long and arduous path, and it’s not smooth. Many people give up at hurdles along the way.



Note (and this is important): Not getting there does not make you less worthy. In some fields, it’s a numbers game.

But I feel now that life is a marathon against myself—I feel contented knowing I’m striving for the best possible version of myself, and I enjoy the process. If you don’t, for whatever enjoy the process, or you don’t feel you have the resilience to keep going, you can still live a happy life. I just recommend this as a good, healthy way of channeling these OCD/perfectionist tendencies.

This is not about the awards you get, or recognition from others, it’s about satisfying your needs. What do you want to achieve in physics? Do you want come up with a new theory? Work in research? Lecture at a university? Write a book? Present your ideas on TV?

I often feel like half of me wants to lead a monastic lifestyle, the other half wants to constantly strive for something. Contrary to what people might think, I don’t think that’s unhealthy. It would be unhealthy if I never felt satisfied by where I’m going, but I do—I feel like I have a sense of purpose. And we could all do with a sense of purpose.

I could easily lead both lives now (monastic or ambitious). My mind is clear. I like routine (if I get to read a lot) and I like career goals in equal measure.

What I don’t like are long periods of idle time, but I think few people do. Otherwise, we wouldn’t have ******** jobs: https://www.economist.com/open-futur...rial-feudalism

It’s good to give yourself a break when you need it, but I do think humans, more or less universally, need to feel a sense of purpose. Thankfully we can create that sense of purpose for ourselves.
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Bunion
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I am overweight and am about to embark onw weight watchers to lose weight. My flatmate is a recovering anorexic and I don't want to trigger her, do I tell her what I am doing or try to hide the weighing of food.etc
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At least 5 GCSEs at grade 5 (32)
14.68%
At least 5 GCSEs at grade 6 (45)
20.64%
Higher than 5 GCSEs at grade 6 (83)
38.07%
Pass in English and Maths GCSE (12)
5.5%
No particular grades needed (12)
5.5%

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