Do your GCSE's affect your ability to transfer from Biomedical Science to Medicine? Watch

f0r6et
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I passed all of my GCSE's but my results are quite bad because I never motivated myself to revise so I ended up with these results:

Mathematics: 7
Art & Design: 7
Biology: 7
Physics: 6
Chemistry: 5
Geography: 5
English Lit: 5
English Lang: 5
Spanish: 4

I'm thinking of internally transferring from Biomedical Science to Medicine- it's competitive so I'm trying my best to get top marks on my A-levels but I'm wondering- would universities make it harder for me to transfer from Biomedical Science to Medicine because of my bad GCSE's? Or would they just judge me solely in the interview and how well I do during the first year of Biomedical Science?
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Reality Check
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Firstly, let's have some perspective. three Grade 7s, one 6 and four 5s are not 'quite bad results'...

Why are you not applying to medicine to begin with? Is it these 'bad' GCSE which are putting you off, or another reason?
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f0r6et
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Firstly, let's have some perspective. three Grade 7s, one 6 and four 5s are not 'quite bad results'...

Why are you not applying to medicine to begin with? Is it these 'bad' GCSE which are putting you off, or another reason?
The entry requirement to take Chemistry as an A-level for my sixth form is to have atleast a grade 6 in GCSE Chemistry but I have a grade 5 and without A-level Chemistry I'm unable to take Medicine- so instead I took A-level Biology, Psychology and Maths that would allow me to apply for a Biomedical Science Course
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Reality Check
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(Original post by f0r6et)
The entry requirement to take Chemistry as an A-level for my sixth form is to have atleast a grade 6 in GCSE Chemistry but I have a grade 5 and without A-level Chemistry I'm unable to take Medicine- so instead I took A-level Biology, Psychology and Maths that would allow me to apply for a Biomedical Science Course
Did you argue your case with them? That by essentially preventing you taking A level Chemistry because of a 5 rather than 6 they were stopping you being able to apply to medicine.
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f0r6et
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Did you argue your case with them? That by essentially preventing you taking A level Chemistry because of a 5 rather than 6 they were stopping you being able to apply to medicine.
Nahhh- I just accepted my fate and prepared myself for the hardships to come :yy: That's why I've gotta know what hardships I've got to go through in order to achieve what I want to be- like for example, the question of this thread
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Reality Check
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(Original post by f0r6et)
Nahhh- I just accepted my fate and prepared myself for the hardships to come :yy: That's why I've gotta know what hardships I've got to go through in order to achieve what I want to be- like for example, the question of this thread
Then I'd say the answer is 'possibly'. Some medical schools require at least a B/6 in Maths, English and Sciences. Others have other specific requirements. Some have GCSE requirements for school-leaver applicants but different ones for graduate applicants. And things change, so in three/four years time it might be quite different.

It's not going to help. But I don't think it'll be the deciding factor on whether or not you're able to get a place to study medicine.
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f0r6et
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Then I'd say the answer is 'possibly'. Some medical schools require at least a B/6 in Maths, English and Sciences. Others have other specific requirements. Some have GCSE requirements for school-leaver applicants but different ones for graduate applicants. And things change, so in three/four years time it might be quite different.

It's not going to help. But I don't think it'll be the deciding factor on whether or not you're able to get a place to study medicine.
Ahh Thank you so much!
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by f0r6et)
The entry requirement to take Chemistry as an A-level for my sixth form is to have atleast a grade 6 in GCSE Chemistry but I have a grade 5 and without A-level Chemistry I'm unable to take Medicine- so instead I took A-level Biology, Psychology and Maths that would allow me to apply for a Biomedical Science Course
Many if not most BMS courses also require A-level Chemistry - specifically the ones that allow you transfer to medicine after first year I believe all do, and in any case the requirements for those internal transfers usually is to otherwise meet the entry criteria for the medical degree in the first place (or very nearly). Some BMS courses are offered via a foundation year where you'll cover the necessary Chemistry and other material in a preliminary year 0 before embarking on the course from first year as usual, although I don't know if any of the ones that have foundation years have internal medicine transfers.

In terms of graduate entry medicine (i.e. after you earn the degree) then no, GCSEs don't matter from what I can tell - most of the courses indicate they won't even usually consider your "original" A-level grades if you take the prerequisite A-level subjects after your degree (although typically they consider lower grades from a first sitting and require standard entry grades if you sit them after your degree). Many GEM courses require A-level Chemistry to be taken at some point though, so if you don't have it from taking it now you will probably need to plan to take if after your degree (which with the science endorsement, presuming that still exists by then, is not an inexpensive endeavour), or have somewhat more limited options for which to apply to (and/or probably need to target GAMSAT courses which tend to not require it so much since the GAMSAT I'm told covers that material and more in the Chemistry parts).

Plymouth/Peninsula only require A-level Biology and another science, and unlike others not requiring A-level Chemistry, don't explicitly require you to have a 7/A in GCSE Chemistry in lieu of the A-level. There may also be some "medicine with a foundation year" courses which you would qualify for - however most are targeted at underrepresented groups in medicine who qualify for contextual flags. Alternately you might be able to apply to an acceptable Access to Medicine course after your A-levels, although acceptability of these varies somewhat so you should check any Access course of interest is accepted by the medical schools you wish to apply to.

You may wish to discuss with your school if there is any way to begin on A-level Chemistry on a trial basis, starting with 4 options, and then having your performance reviewed after a few weeks/months to determine if you can continue. If they can arrange that, it would probably be the easiest option compared to the above. Alternately, see if there are any other schools that don't have that requirement for GCSE grades...essentially any route into medicine which isn't standard undergraduate entry is considerably more competitive, so it would be better to do what you can to meet the standard entry criteria initially than go another route, because the other routes are much harder.
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Had_m12
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Many if not most BMS courses also require A-level Chemistry - specifically the ones that allow you transfer to medicine after first year I believe all do, and in any case the requirements for those internal transfers usually is to otherwise meet the entry criteria for the medical degree in the first place (or very nearly). Some BMS courses are offered via a foundation year where you'll cover the necessary Chemistry and other material in a preliminary year 0 before embarking on the course from first year as usual, although I don't know if any of the ones that have foundation years have internal medicine transfers.

In terms of graduate entry medicine (i.e. after you earn the degree) then no, GCSEs don't matter from what I can tell - most of the courses indicate they won't even usually consider your "original" A-level grades if you take the prerequisite A-level subjects after your degree (although typically they consider lower grades from a first sitting and require standard entry grades if you sit them after your degree). Many GEM courses require A-level Chemistry to be taken at some point though, so if you don't have it from taking it now you will probably need to plan to take if after your degree (which with the science endorsement, presuming that still exists by then, is not an inexpensive endeavour), or have somewhat more limited options for which to apply to (and/or probably need to target GAMSAT courses which tend to not require it so much since the GAMSAT I'm told covers that material and more in the Chemistry parts).

Plymouth/Peninsula only require A-level Biology and another science, and unlike others not requiring A-level Chemistry, don't explicitly require you to have a 7/A in GCSE Chemistry in lieu of the A-level. There may also be some "medicine with a foundation year" courses which you would qualify for - however most are targeted at underrepresented groups in medicine who qualify for contextual flags. Alternately you might be able to apply to an acceptable Access to Medicine course after your A-levels, although acceptability of these varies somewhat so you should check any Access course of interest is accepted by the medical schools you wish to apply to.

You may wish to discuss with your school if there is any way to begin on A-level Chemistry on a trial basis, starting with 4 options, and then having your performance reviewed after a few weeks/months to determine if you can continue. If they can arrange that, it would probably be the easiest option compared to the above. Alternately, see if there are any other schools that don't have that requirement for GCSE grades...essentially any route into medicine which isn't standard undergraduate entry is considerably more competitive, so it would be better to do what you can to meet the standard entry criteria initially than go another route, because the other routes are much harder.
I am also stuck in a similar situation as i have achieved all 5's and a 6 in combined science. I have heard that most of the unis require 6s and above at GCSE. so i can't do medicine? I am currently on my first year doing A level Chem, Bio and sociology.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Had_m12)
I am also stuck in a similar situation as i have achieved all 5's and a 6 in combined science. I have heard that most of the unis require 6s and above at GCSE. so i can't do medicine? I am currently on my first year doing A level Chem, Bio and sociology.
I believe not all have specific criteria for GCSE attainment. The aforementioned Plymouth/Peninsula just require 7 passes, and I believe one of the college ATs (I forget which) indicated last year Cambridge is phasing out specific GCSE grade requirements for all courses including Medicine (although your GCSEs would probably still weaken an application there...). Generally not all medical schools emphasize GCSEs that much; I get the impression a lot of UKCAT universities don't use them as extensively.

You just need to check the individual entry criteria for each course you're considering. I think there are only about thirty medical schools in the country which offer UG medicine, so it shouldn't take too long to check this for each course.
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f0r6et
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
many if not most bms courses also require a-level chemistry - specifically the ones that allow you transfer to medicine after first year i believe all do, and in any case the requirements for those internal transfers usually is to otherwise meet the entry criteria for the medical degree in the first place (or very nearly). Some bms courses are offered via a foundation year where you'll cover the necessary chemistry and other material in a preliminary year 0 before embarking on the course from first year as usual, although i don't know if any of the ones that have foundation years have internal medicine transfers.

In terms of graduate entry medicine (i.e. After you earn the degree) then no, gcses don't matter from what i can tell - most of the courses indicate they won't even usually consider your "original" a-level grades if you take the prerequisite a-level subjects after your degree (although typically they consider lower grades from a first sitting and require standard entry grades if you sit them after your degree). Many gem courses require a-level chemistry to be taken at some point though, so if you don't have it from taking it now you will probably need to plan to take if after your degree (which with the science endorsement, presuming that still exists by then, is not an inexpensive endeavour), or have somewhat more limited options for which to apply to (and/or probably need to target gamsat courses which tend to not require it so much since the gamsat i'm told covers that material and more in the chemistry parts).

Plymouth/peninsula only require a-level biology and another science, and unlike others not requiring a-level chemistry, don't explicitly require you to have a 7/a in gcse chemistry in lieu of the a-level. There may also be some "medicine with a foundation year" courses which you would qualify for - however most are targeted at underrepresented groups in medicine who qualify for contextual flags. Alternately you might be able to apply to an acceptable access to medicine course after your a-levels, although acceptability of these varies somewhat so you should check any access course of interest is accepted by the medical schools you wish to apply to.

You may wish to discuss with your school if there is any way to begin on a-level chemistry on a trial basis, starting with 4 options, and then having your performance reviewed after a few weeks/months to determine if you can continue. If they can arrange that, it would probably be the easiest option compared to the above. Alternately, see if there are any other schools that don't have that requirement for gcse grades...essentially any route into medicine which isn't standard undergraduate entry is considerably more competitive, so it would be better to do what you can to meet the standard entry criteria initially than go another route, because the other routes are much harder.
:'d thank you so much!!
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Had_m12
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so here are the unis i found near me that dont really focus on GCSE
uni of birmingham
anglia rusken
university of oxford

Do you think there is a chance?

(Original post by ecolier)
https://www.medschools.ac.uk/media/2...al-schools.pdf

Many med schools specify that they need at least a B in English Language for undergraduate medicine. The second half of the med school requirements document will list what is required for graduate entry medicine.
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erinls2
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(Original post by Had_m12)
so here are the unis i found near me that dont really focus on GCSE
uni of birmingham
anglia rusken
university of oxford

Do you think there is a chance?
Hi, where did you get this info from? I'm from Oxford and study medicine at uni of Birmingham. GCSEs are certainly important at Birmingham, there's a 60 or 70% weighting on them when applying. And Oxford definitely cares! I had 7A*'s and 3A's at GCSE and I didn't apply because that's low for Oxford medicine - if you look on their website the average number of A*'s is 10.4!
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nexttime
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(Original post by Had_m12)
so here are the unis i found near me that dont really focus on GCSE
uni of birmingham
anglia rusken
university of oxford

Do you think there is a chance?
Oh dear. You hae picked two of the most GCSE heavy unis that exist there! You will need to improve your Google skills if you are to stand a chance of getting into med school.

For example, i googled "Birmingham medicine GCSE requirements" and the first hit explained how their pre-interview score is 60% GCSEs, with A*s getting an especially high weighting. Not hard.

The relevant link for Oxford is below. Good luck with your research.

https://www.medsci.ox.ac.uk/study/me...cal/statistics
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ka.milll
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(Original post by f0r6et)
I passed all of my GCSE's but my results are quite bad because I never motivated myself to revise so I ended up with these results:

Mathematics: 7
Art & Design: 7
Biology: 7
Physics: 6
Chemistry: 5
Geography: 5
English Lit: 5
English Lang: 5
Spanish: 4

I'm thinking of internally transferring from Biomedical Science to Medicine- it's competitive so I'm trying my best to get top marks on my A-levels but I'm wondering- would universities make it harder for me to transfer from Biomedical Science to Medicine because of my bad GCSE's? Or would they just judge me solely in the interview and how well I do during the first year of Biomedical Science?
You can easily apply for medicine with those grades.. just do your research and find unis which dont take them into account during admissions. I got 4As 8Bs and 1C in english language and now I am applying for biomedicine with the aim of studying medicine later. Graduate medicine degrees ususally have much lower entry requirements.
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f0r6et
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(Original post by ka.milll)
You can easily apply for medicine with those grades.. just do your research and find unis which dont take them into account during admissions. I got 4As 8Bs and 1C in english language and now I am applying for biomedicine with the aim of studying medicine later. Graduate medicine degrees ususally have much lower entry requirements.
Ahh thank you~ <3 :')
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f0r6et
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(Original post by ka.milll)
You can easily apply for medicine with those grades.. just do your research and find unis which dont take them into account during admissions. I got 4As 8Bs and 1C in english language and now I am applying for biomedicine with the aim of studying medicine later. Graduate medicine degrees ususally have much lower entry requirements.
I have a question- What circumstance did you face that made you take the biomedical way to medicine? And not medicine straight away?
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