Putin is sneaking up on Europe from the south Watch

Napp
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An interesting piece but one i take umbrage with a myriad of his points on
Namely his assertions that
1] Russia went to Syria to 'save an ally' - Whilst the technical terminology can just about be stretched to be correct here its hardly an unknown fact that Moscows move back to Syria had very little to do with Assad as opposed to broader geo-political and economic considerations.
2] Iran is under Russian influence - This is utter rubbish and even the most ignorant of undergraduate IR/Pols/History students know this to be, at best, a highly specious claim.
3] Russia is the decisive power broker in syria - It might have started that way but Assad with his IRGC/Hizbollah allies are more than capable of flattening Idlib now. Not to mention as we have seen countless times despite Moscows strong arming Assad he doesnt necesserily do what they command.
4] His trite remarks on Russian supplying high tech weaponry to despots in the region - he seems to be forgetting that this is exactly what the US has/does/will continue to do
5] and finally, every single point he seems to raise is only noteworthy because it is those pesky ruskies... This is the broad, and rather xenophobic, theme of his post in that all of the aforementioned are only bad because Moscow is notionally behind it. He seems to clearly forget Washingtons place in all of this.

Aside from ones political gripes with the piece though its an entertaining read XD

The first big battles between the U.S. military and the Wehrmacht during World War II were not actually in Europe. Between Nov. 8 and Nov. 10, 1942, the United States and allied forces landed in Algeria and Morocco. After defeating Vichy French forces, the armies proceeded east to Tunisia to take on the German forces in that country. Why North Africa? Allied military planners had determined that an invasion of France in 1942 was doomed to fail, so plans were made to attack Germany from—as Winston Churchill reportedly remarked—the “soft belly of the Mediterranean.” It was from Tunisia that the invasion of Italy and the long, bloody march to Berlin began.
Perhaps Russian President Vladimir Putin is a student of history, or maybe he likes maps, but whatever his hobby, he seems to understand geography quite well. The character of Moscow’s influence differs greatly from the old Soviet days when it was collecting client states (except for Russia’s ongoing deployment of force in Syria). But it has been effective—or effective enough—in drawing important allies away from the United States while presenting Russia as a competent, nonideological partner that shares interests with the regional players. Therein lies the central logic to Russia’s Middle East-Europe strategy: establish influence at Washington’s expense, weakening the U.S. position in the region, and in the process apply pressure on Europe via its weak underbelly—in this case to the south and southeast of the European Union.

Draw a line on a map from Moscow to Damascus and from the Syrian capital to Erbil in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Everyone knows what happened in Syria: The Russians entered the conflict there to save an ally and have helped him prosecute a war that has produced millions of refugees, many of whom have made their way to Europe and left others banging on its gates. The effects on European politics have been profound, galvanizing a populist, nativist, and pro-Russian right at the expense of Europe’s postwar liberal consensus. While Syria is a well-known story, only a few in Washington seem to have noticed that since 2017, Russia has reportedly invested $4 billion in the Kurdish oil and gas sector. From Erbil extends the line of Russian influence and power to the east from Iraqi Kurdistan to Iran.
That Moscow-Damascus-Erbil-Tehran line represents an important axis of Russian influence. But other Russia-dominated geographic lines are even more relevant for Europe.
One line starts in the Russian capital and proceeds due south to the Turkish capital, Ankara. Moscow has not exactly turned Turkey, but the combination of Syria, where Putin is the powerbroker; Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s worldview; and the still changing nature of international politics after the Cold War, has made a Turkey-Russia partnership of sorts possible. The Turks are scheduled to receive Russia’s advanced S-400 air defense system in July 2019, Turkey’s volume of trade with Russia is bigger than with the United States, and Erdogan recently identified Moscow—along with Beijing and Tehran—as an alternative to Washington. All of this has stoked (mostly overblown) fears within the Washington policy community about “losing Turkey,” but for the Europeans who are connected to Ankara through the flow of goods and services and who regard Anatolia as a buffer between them and Moscow, burgeoning Turkey-Russia ties are a problem.
Rather than reversing Henry Kissinger’s 1970s-era Westward flip of the Egyptians, Moscow has pushed and pulled in places where Americans and Egyptians have been at loggerheads. This can’t make European leaders very comfortable. About 10 percent of world trade—much of it going to and from Europe—passes through the Suez Canal. Egypt’s ties to Russia also raise the prospect that for the first time in a long time, U.S. and European navies may not be able to operate totally unimpeded in the Eastern Mediterranean.Start again, but this time cross the Mediterranean and stop at Cairo, make a sharp left and extend the line to Benghazi. That is the third axis. The Russians, with their uncompromising position regarding the threat of Islamism, offer high-tech weaponry—and a no-questions-asked policy on human rights—and for Egypt’s leaders that’s an appealing alternative to the United States. Egypt has been a critical component of the existing regional political order, which has favored the exercise of U.S. power in the Middle East for at least three decades.
Libya is the most intriguing and revealing of all of Moscow’s plays in the region. It is unclear how deeply involved they are in the eastern part of the country, but the Russians are certainly aligned with the Egyptians and Emiratis in opposition to any political settlement that includes an Islamist component to a new government in Tripoli. The would-be Libyan strongman Khalifa Haftar has met with Russian officials several times, and in 2017 Putin (not coincidentally) deployed a small Russian force to an air base in western Egypt about 60 miles from the Libyan border. Publicly, the Russians have counseled compromise among Libyan political forces, but the Europeans suspect that Moscow supports Haftar.
Libya might seem a stretch for Putin, who, it is often said, has limited resources to expend on foreign policy. Why bother? Well, underneath eastern Libya is one of the world’s largest reserves of light, sweet crude oil and the fifth-largest reserves of natural gas in Africa. The bulk of Libya’s oil and gas exports go to Europe. It would be strategically remiss of Putin not to become involved in Libya, a place from which Russia can potentially influence energy supplies to Europe. It seems to be a pretty good bet that this has crossed the Russian president’s mind.
Only last year, Russia experts were dismissing the country’s intervention in Syria, its information campaign in Europe, and the annexation of Crimea as little more than a nuisance. It should be clear by now, however, that Moscow’s return to the Middle East beyond Syria is about something much bigger—just take a look at the map.
https://foreignpolicy.com/2018/08/31...rom-the-south/
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Johnny English
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Another anti western post keen on diverting blame from anything Russia might do ...
Russia and its leader is a corrupt country not worthy of any pandering whatsoever...Whilst I agree that America and the west may not be perfect , it does at least have a booming economy ...booming waistline ..and some excellent Elvis Presley impersonators.....although I am told that the worlds best Elvis impersonator actually comes from Stoke on Trent .
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Napp
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(Original post by Johnny English)
Another anti western post keen on diverting blame from anything Russia might do ...
Russia and its leader is a corrupt country not worthy of any pandering whatsoever...Whilst I agree that America and the west may not be perfect , it does at least have a booming economy ...booming waistline ..and some excellent Elvis Presley impersonators.....although I am told that the worlds best Elvis impersonator actually comes from Stoke on Trent .
Do you actually disagree with any I wrote or do you simply take umbrage with ones ‘calling out’ of America (not the West per se)
‘May not be perfect’ that made me laugh 😂
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Johnny English
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Given the choice between the yanks or the Russians telling the truth about anything then I would tend to go for the yanks .....
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Napp
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(Original post by Johnny English)
Given the choice between the yanks or the Russians telling the truth about anything then I would tend to go for the yanks .....
I’d tend to say they’re both lying actually.
With that being said Russia isn’t the one whose liberal use of lies led us into the quagmire that is Iraq and it’s assorted off shoot conflicts.
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Johnny English
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Of course ....I believe the two Russians on holiday in Salisbury for two days is completely plausible ...

The Novichoc twins .
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Napp
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(Original post by Johnny English)
Of course ....I believe the two Russians on holiday in Salisbury for two days is completely plausible ...

The Novichoc twins .
Eh?
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ChaoticButterfly
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Major Power plays geopolitics?

Next you will be telling us water is wet.
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Johnny English
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(Original post by Napp)
Eh?
Do you believe the Novichoc twins were merely tourists ?
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Napp
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(Original post by Johnny English)
Do you believe the Novichoc twins were merely tourists ?
What has ones view on that got to do with either the article or any of the points made?
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Johnny English
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Well just answer the question and I'll get back to you .

Were the Ruskiss tourists ?
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emmataco
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NATO should not have expanded into eastern europe. NATO pursued a policy of confrontation after russia and is now upset when russia does the same
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Napp
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(Original post by Johnny English)
Well just answer the question and I'll get back to you .

Were the Ruskiss tourists ?
How on earth would I know? More to the point how on earth do you know? Last time I checked there was the rather key word “alleged” attached, a rather key modifier wouldn’t you say?
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PTMalewski
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(Original post by Johnny English)
Another anti western post keen on diverting blame from anything Russia might do ...
Russia and its leader is a corrupt country not worthy of any pandering whatsoever...Whilst I agree that America and the west may not be perfect , it does at least have a booming economy ...booming waistline ..and some excellent Elvis Presley impersonators.....although I am told that the worlds best Elvis impersonator actually comes from Stoke on Trent .
Saying that Russia and Putin are corrupt is the same sort of 'cultural blindness' as the naive belief of the West that you can introduce democracy to the Middle East, or that a dictatorship is always worse than democracy.

Corruption in Russia is like corruption in China- kingodoms and dynasties fall, and corruption stays- it's a cultural habit that lives for centuries and won't die down, sooner than centuries ahead. In the case of Russia, it was born because of the 'Кормле́ние'. The administration was receiving money not from the state, but from the people. Legal charges for settling the matters, same as charge at a barbershop or sth.
Also, having a large fortune, was a common practice in many monarchies, as a securement of the reign. Russia has next to zero democratic traditions, so democracy simply cannot work there this century.

And good for them. And us. Because Putin is at least a rational politician, and he is not Panslavic. There is Russian opposition who believe that Russia should lead and unite all Slavic countries. Would you like to have against you Russia leading the block consisting of most of the middle-Europe and the Balkans? I guess not.

What effectively saves the mid-Europe and Balkans from further Russian expansion is that Putin doesn't fanatically believe in Panslavic ideology and he is, though corrupt, a rational politician, and what saves the West from serious Russian domination, is, apart from their weak economy and small, dying down population, the fact that some Slavic countries, or Poland at least, are psychotically anti-Russian, and they would sooner decide the destroy own countries and nations, rather than ally with Russia.
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Johnny English
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(Original post by Napp)
How on earth would I know? More to the point how on earth do you know? Last time I checked there was the rather key word “alleged” attached, a rather key modifier wouldn’t you say
Rarely ...very rarely do I ever dive in and shout guilty as suspected . These two are guilty 100% . They got caught with their pants down and the Russians know . You only had to see the expressions on their faces to see that they were lying as was Putin and the officials in Moscow . All this said , it's pretty pointless pursuing the case any longer because the Russians will not permit extradition back to the UK.
The backlash from this one attack will live long in the memory I'm afraid . Russia is currently in the process of a big military build up and this looks set to continue in the near future.
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Napp
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(Original post by Johnny English)
Rarely ...very rarely do I ever dive in and shout guilty as suspected . These two are guilty 100% . They got caught with their pants down and the Russians know . You only had to see the expressions on their faces to see that they were lying as was Putin and the officials in Moscow . All this said , it's pretty pointless pursuing the case any longer because the Russians will not permit extradition back to the UK.
The backlash from this one attack will live long in the memory I'm afraid . Russia is currently in the process of a big military build up and this looks set to continue in the near future.
Again, I made absolutely no comment on whether they were or were not guilty I simply said people cant run their mouths about the rule of law whilst at the same time rubbishing the most basic tenets of our legal system.

Technically Russia is at the end of her military modernization and the program is being wound down now.
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Stalin
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(Original post by Johnny English)
Rarely ...very rarely do I ever dive in and shout guilty as suspected . These two are guilty 100% . They got caught with their pants down and the Russians know . You only had to see the expressions on their faces to see that they were lying as was Putin and the officials in Moscow . All this said , it's pretty pointless pursuing the case any longer because the Russians will not permit extradition back to the UK.
The backlash from this one attack will live long in the memory I'm afraid . Russia is currently in the process of a big military build up and this looks set to continue in the near future.
They are guilty 100% because of the expressions on their faces?

Has this become the new standard to determine whether someone is guilty? Facial expressions?

Really?
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