1 in 3 freshers show symptoms of mental health disorder

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chelseadagg3r
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According to a new a international study, one in three university level students report symptoms of a mental health disorder, such as major depression, mania, generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, alcohol use disorder and substance use disorder.

You can read more about it here

Do these findings surprise you or do they sound like what you've seen or experienced? Are universities doing enough to support students, particularly in their first year of university?
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hello_shawn
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Mental health? If they were not told to follow the herd and instead pursued ambitions close to their heart, there would be no such issue. They shouldn't have to pay £9000 a year for a future they're not guaranteed.
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ftfy
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(Original post by hello_shawn)
Mental health? If they were not told to follow the herd and instead pursued ambitions close to their heart, there would be no such issue. They shouldn't have to pay £9000 a year for a future they're not guaranteed.
What are you talking about?
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Trinculo
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(Original post by chelseadagg3r)
According to a new a international study, one in three university level students report symptoms of a mental health disorder, such as major depression, mania, generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, alcohol use disorder and substance use disorder.

You can read more about it here

Do these findings surprise you or do they sound like what you've seen or experienced? Are universities doing enough to support students, particularly in their first year of university?
Just stop right there.

The methodology they've used is about the same one as you see on campuses up and down the country with people a week before dissertation submission in the union cafes with ipads desperately looking for people to survey, and going around the TSR Survey forum giving one another reach arounds.

Sending out a Survey Monkey asking freshers if they have drank too much, taken drugs and are concerned about stuff is hardly the apogee of Public Health research.
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Pathway
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(Original post by hello_shawn)
Mental health? If they were not told to follow the herd and instead pursued ambitions close to their heart, there would be no such issue. They shouldn't have to pay £9000 a year for a future they're not guaranteed.
Well, I still had MH issues before going to university. University helped me in a lot of ways. People would still have MH issues regardless.
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CoolCavy
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Had them before I went so can't really comment tbh, got diagnosed whilst at uni but that wasn't because of uni was just cos I was away from home so had the freedom to seek professional advice
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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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Didn't know my undergrad uni has a Centre for Suicide Research... :holmes:

I'm not surprised at all by the findings. I can't speak for all unis but I imagine many of them cannot help support students the way they would want to, due to restricted finances. Generally speaking, I'm not sure that unis do enough for students. I've attended three unis (only one of them at undergrad level, mind you) and the support has been hugely variable.

I think certain unis could and should be doing a much better job of supporting students tbh
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bones-mccoy
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There's not enough support for university students full stop regardless of whether they're a fresher or a postgrad. The lack of funding has a lot to answer for - the uni I did my undergrad at could only give out counselling sessions in blocks of 3 or 6 as their budget only stretched so far. Luckily (or not luckily really) I was deemed too severe so was given pretty much unlimited sessions for as long as I needed them.
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username4242832
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(Original post by chelseadagg3r)
According to a new a international study, one in three university level students report symptoms of a mental health disorder, such as major depression, mania, generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, alcohol use disorder and substance use disorder.

You can read more about it here

Do these findings surprise you or do they sound like what you've seen or experienced? Are universities doing enough to support students, particularly in their first year of university?
It's societies fault and the sheep who follow it.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by chelseadagg3r)
According to a new a international study, one in three university level students report symptoms of a mental health disorder, such as major depression, mania, generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, alcohol use disorder and substance use disorder.

You can read more about it here

Do these findings surprise you or do they sound like what you've seen or experienced? Are universities doing enough to support students, particularly in their first year of university?
She went blue...
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stettafire
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Isn't everyone mentally ill nowadays?
More people then you think, certainly. never assume anyone is normal or straightforward, because they're probably not and that's ok.
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Golden State
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I think it's because of the pressures of modern life on younger adults.
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iodo345
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(Original post by ltsmith)
He has a valid point. Lots of people feel there isn't any alternative to university.

I sure weren't told about degree apprenticeship, the trades and the military when I was in school.
Yeah it is all just brainwashing to do with how you have to go uni or you will fail in life.
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Unknown-99
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Not surprising at all when lots of freshers were probably pressured into going to uni in the first place when they didn't want to or pressured to study something they don't have any interest in.
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J Papi
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Sounds dodgy as ****, even though I wouldn't be suprised if 'addicted to £1.50 shots' would count as alcohol use disorder.
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by RivalPlayer)
A lot of young people like to medicalise their unhappiness. The loosening of the diagnosis of depression, in particular, to encompass all forms of unhappiness has made this easier to do.
How many people actually say "I'm unhappy" these days? The answer is very few. Now everyone says "I'm depressed". The word unhappy has almost vanished from everyday conversation.

This is because if someone simply says they are unhappy, it would invite the possibility that their lifestyle choices or immoral conduct has contributed to their discontent. But when someone says "I'm depressed", it absolves them of personal responsibility – since depression is an illness, which is a problem for the good doctor to solve.

When someone says they are depressed as opposed to unhappy, they become a victim of an illness and this helps them to evade any form of genuine self examination. Such people become convinced that their unhappiness has just fallen from the sky; that it has nothing to do with the ways they have chosen to live their lives. They are simply to be viewed only as immaculate victims – no comment can be made on their poor lifestyle choices. We must all be nonjudgmental.

It’s also become fashionable to identify as someone with a mental health problem. You only have to look at the number of so-called celebrities “bravely” talking about their mental health struggles. A new celeb seems to “come out” every day.
Doubtless, this will encourage the masses of young minds, who regularly consume the trash that is modern celebrity culture, to emulate those they look up to.

The people who will suffer the most from this rampant desire to medicalise anything that deviates from the state of happiness will be those who are genuinely mentally ill and in desperate need of help. When mental illness is trivialised and definitions loosened, it should surprise no one that services become overwhelmed and incapable of helping those who really need it.
Depression isn't the only mental illness.
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Pathway
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(Original post by RivalPlayer)
Yeah, I know that. But it's one of the most - if not the most - common mental illness many young people say they are supposedly suffering with.

You don't often hear young people saying "I'm schizophrenic" to describe the way they feel in response to something bad.

"I'm depressed" or "I'm anxious". It's between those two.
Tbh I think that part of the reason it's more commonly diagnosed is that it's the diagnosis that most GPs are comfortable with, same for anxiety. Most people never leave primary care to get more specialist diagnoses, and one of the reasons for that is funding.
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by RivalPlayer)
Yeah, I know that. But it's one of the most - if not the most - common mental illness many young people say they are supposedly suffering with.

You don't often hear young people say "I'm schizophrenic" to describe the way they feel in response to something bad.

"I'm depressed" or "I'm anxious". It's between those two.
Yeh I agree people throw around those words far too often but those people aren't the reason that it's so hard for genuinely mentally ill people (who are probably the majority - just that a loud minority of people who think it's trendy to have mental illness shout the loudest) is because of funding, specialist personality disorder therapy (which a self diagnosed depressed person would never get to the stages of getting as you need psychaitrist evaluation etc) is a year long wait. Given that stuff like BPD makes up 1% of the population the waitlist for that isn't caused by self diagnosing teenagers clogging it up, it's caused by lack of funding.
For me personally the medicalisation of what I feel to BPD is not a way for me to avoid responsibility, it was a way for me to access more specialist help (in theory anyway) and to feel that I was actually a bit valid and not just alone and crazy.
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Pathway
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Yeh I agree people throw around those words far too often but those people aren't the reason that it's so hard for genuinely mentally ill people (who are probably the majority - just that a loud minority of people who think it's trendy to have mental illness shout the loudest) is because of funding, specialist personality disorder therapy (which a self diagnosed depressed person would never get to the stages of getting as you need psychaitrist evaluation etc) is a year long wait. Given that stuff like BPD makes up 1% of the population the waitlist for that isn't caused by self diagnosing teenagers clogging it up, it's caused by lack of funding.
For me personally the medicalisation of what I feel to BPD is not a way for me to avoid responsibility, it was a way for me to access more specialist help (in theory anyway) and to feel that I was actually a bit valid and not just alone and crazy.
Yeah, I've waited over a year to start therapy at Step 4 for complex trauma (and other stuff). Like there is no money for people more severely affected by their MH issues, so we just continue to deteriorate.
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TheTroll73
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not surprising at all

depression and anxiety are becoming so common at that age group at least

well I'm not depressed or anxious

however I'm not free of mental disorders, I keep them my whole life :P
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