Does going to a russel group/well known uni with a 2.1 confer advantage?

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Tawheed
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A cousin of mine will graduate from KCL with a 2.1 - will he had an advantage at graduate schemes?
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Doones
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(Original post by Tawheed)
A cousin of mine will graduate from KCL with a 2.1 - will he had an advantage at graduate schemes?
He'll have some advantage over anyone with a 2.2.
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Tawheed
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
He'll have some advantage over anyone with a 2.2.
Does a degree from KCL have the same impact as a degree from a university ranked 150th in the UK? I know people who have gone to both types of universities and the quality / standards / difficulty getting in are earth and sky. However you might be better informed in terms of how it translates into the real world.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by Tawheed)
Does a degree from KCL have the same impact as a degree from a university ranked 150th in the UK? I know people who have gone to both types of universities and the quality / standards / difficulty getting in are earth and sky. However you might be better informed in terms of how it translates into the real world.
Real answer is probably does, but the boost is insignificant for graduate courses which do not really have to make fine distinctions between seemingly equivalent students. They normally can take both of 'em on.

EDIT: Grad schemes. Again, probably does. The difference is that they're looking at so many different criteria it is unlikely that there are equivalent applicants who can be distinguished by where they got their 2:1 from. Except for certain sectors which can be a little exclusionary to people from seemingly non-academic backgrounds.

EDIT EDIT: Doones graph talks about most important. Does not say if uni is "important" or even "considered". Also consults managers who might have an official policy; doesn't mean that policy is put into action by lowly recruiters; also chiefly consults industries which are outwardly meritocratic. I find it worrying that 13% thought uni a most important factor! That's insane.
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Tawheed
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Real answer is probably does, but the boost is insignificant for graduate courses which do not really have to make fine distinctions between seemingly equivalent students. They normally can take both of 'em on.
Ah, it seems there is opportunity for almost everyone to land a certain graduate job in this case? If there is so much surplus of posts, it seems rather bright for those who are graduates.
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Doones
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(Original post by Tawheed)
Does a degree from KCL have the same impact as a degree from a university ranked 150th in the UK? I know people who have gone to both types of universities and the quality / standards / difficulty getting in are earth and sky.
Depends on the sector/employer but generally there's more imprtant things to choose between candidates than the ranking of their university.

Also... which ranking "matters"? Which specific publisher (they all use different methodologies)? National or international? Is it the subject ranking, or overall? Was it the ranking for the year you went to university, or when you graduated... or when the interviewer went to university...?

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Tawheed
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Depends on the sector/employer but generally there's more imprtant things to choose between candidates than the ranking of their university.

Also... which ranking "matters"? Which specific publisher (they all use different methodologies)? National or international? Is it the subject ranking, or overall? Was it the ranking for the year you went to university, or when you graduated... or when the interviewer went to university...?

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Great information here and evidence, thanks!

From what i can see, the university you went to seems to not factor for most employers as the first thing they notice, but it could be argued that a question phrased in the sense of asking them whether among many important factors, would it be in their top four may be fruitful. Rankings are pretty subjective, i agree, but then again there seem to be certain universities with a brand name and recognition.
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Doones
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(Original post by Tawheed)
Great information here and evidence, thanks!

From what i can see, the university you went to seems to not factor for most employers as the first thing they notice, but it could be argued that a question phrased in the sense of asking them whether among many important factors, would it be in their top four may be fruitful.
As I said, it's normally not an issue. It's up to you to be the best candidate you can be - if you are at a "less well known" university you will have every opportunity to be a strong candidate. Employers are looking to employ good people, not "good" universities.
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username738914
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(Original post by Tawheed)
A cousin of mine will graduate from KCL with a 2.1 - will he had an advantage at graduate schemes?
yes going to a top university (whether generally or in a niche) will confer an advantage but in a mostly indirect way.

however the indirect advantage is so much better than not having the advantage that some people may assume that it's just the difference in university name - it's not.

now, if he doesn't make use of any of these indirectly advantageous opportunities then he's pretty much on the same level as someone who doesn't have them.

ergo, it's not a simple case of "he will do better" more of a conditional "he has the opportunity to do better, if he chooses to take it up".

direct advantages are pretty rare, but they do happen (e.g. companies that don't recruit anyone outside of a set list of unis).

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Tawheed
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
As I said, it's normally not an issue. It's up to you to be the best candidate you can be - if you are at a "less well known" university you will have every opportunity to be a strong candidate. Employers are looking to employ good people, not "good" universities.
Can't disagree with that. It seems whatever the situation, there is a way and that involves work, growth, foresight, networking and putting in a great application.
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username738914
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(Original post by Tawheed)
Great information here and evidence, thanks!

From what i can see, the university you went to seems to not factor for most employers as the first thing they notice, but it could be argued that a question phrased in the sense of asking them whether among many important factors, would it be in their top four may be fruitful. Rankings are pretty subjective, i agree, but then again there seem to be certain universities with a brand name and recognition.
exactly, reputation rarely changes as wildly as rankings do. they're a really imperfect way of looking at universities

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Doones
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(Original post by Tawheed)
but then again there seem to be certain universities with a brand name and recognition.
When I was hiring grads for a specific role I generally found candidates from a particular university were often among the best. That university is known in my industry but is definitely not Russell Group, or even at all "prestigious" to the outside world.

Other candidates weren't disadvantaged if they had been at a different university (and that includes applicants from Oxbridge/RG too) so long as they could demonstrate the strengths I was looking for.
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pmc:producer
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It also depends on what industry you want to pursue - consultancy or banking and yes, a top tier uni brand will carry significant weight over London Met for example. In retail, probably not so much.

Also at a 'higher ranked uni' you may be exposed to firms, mock interviews, external consultancy projects, study abroad opportunities at great partner universities etc.

This can afford you a better chance of understanding the industry you're applying to, having a small network of people within your ideal company of choice, having relevant, practical experience, having study abroad experience etc. All of which will give you and advantage vs someone who doesn't have the above.

I guess the point here is that a 'higher ranked' uni can bring more to the table than it's brand and as such, it can be difficult to quantify any advantage.
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