siellen
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Hi all,

I am new here and I have a bit of a dilemma.

To give some perspective, I moved to the UK 3 years ago.
I wanted to be a vet for a long time but as I was getting closer to finish secondary school in my country, I started to doubt what I wanted in life. I graduated, got not too bad grades at the end but still wasn't enough for me to apply to good unis here.
Since I moved here I completed my GCSEs and now I'm in second year of A levels. A week of work experience at a veterinary surgery during my GCSEs made me realise that I still have a strong interest in veterinary medicine. Now I have done quite a few weeks of work experience, I have emailed all the potential vet schools, explaining my different background and I got positive feedback, they would consider my application.

And for some reason I find myself hesitant and anxious about applying. I don't know if it's because I have been waiting for this moment for so long, to finally try myself and apply for veterinary medicine or if it's because deep down I know, maybe I'm not made for vet school?
I feel like at this stage I am more afraid of getting in than being rejected.

I would appreciate any insights, comments, maybe some good advice if anyone had any similar experience

Thank you
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SherlockMetson
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I think it is very normal to doubt yourself. I was a midwife for many years and never quite got over the feeling I was actually bluffing and one day someone would find out I wasn't supposed to be there! (As it is my colleagues remember me as a great midwife and would love me to return to practice). My daughter has just been accepted to vet school and can't quite believe she has been so lucky. Tells me how clever and deserving everyone else is. (She is incredible and fully deserves her place). What I'm saying is have a little faith in yourself. You may change direction along the way but that's fine too. Life is full of surprises. Give it a go. It could be amazing.
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VMD100
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It is absolutely natural to have that imposter syndrome, most of my friends and I felt similar when we first started the course - you've aimed and worked so hard for a place that when it is just given to you... you can't accept it for a while. Trust me this attitude definitely shifts as you realise how hard the course is and dare I say it the novelty wears off quickly

But if you are still hesitant, do more experience - different vet practices, but more importantly husbandry environments. Get a feel for farms and stables not just small animals - you may never deal with a horse in your life after graduation but to graduate you need to be remotely competent around them and the clients they are attached to. I'd argue people that if you've never had a lambing placement where you've been dealing with disaster after disaster and at 4am are thinking why on earth didn't I choose medicine you've not had a real lambing placement

But if after lots of placements you still think the life is for you then go for it, you won't get in if universities didn't think you could academically handle the course so if you are given an offer they believe in you, the rest of the belief is down to you
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siellen
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(Original post by SherlockMetson)
I think it is very normal to doubt yourself. I was a midwife for many years and never quite got over the feeling I was actually bluffing and one day someone would find out I wasn't supposed to be there! (As it is my colleagues remember me as a great midwife and would love me to return to practice). My daughter has just been accepted to vet school and can't quite believe she has been so lucky. Tells me how clever and deserving everyone else is. (She is incredible and fully deserves her place). What I'm saying is have a little faith in yourself. You may change direction along the way but that's fine too. Life is full of surprises. Give it a go. It could be amazing.
Thank you for taking your time to write this piece of advice, it is really helpful. You are right, we never know where life takes us.
And congratulations to your daughter and all the best luck for her!
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siellen
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(Original post by VMD100)
It is absolutely natural to have that imposter syndrome, most of my friends and I felt similar when we first started the course - you've aimed and worked so hard for a place that when it is just given to you... you can't accept it for a while. Trust me this attitude definitely shifts as you realise how hard the course is and dare I say it the novelty wears off quickly

But if you are still hesitant, do more experience - different vet practices, but more importantly husbandry environments. Get a feel for farms and stables not just small animals - you may never deal with a horse in your life after graduation but to graduate you need to be remotely competent around them and the clients they are attached to. I'd argue people that if you've never had a lambing placement where you've been dealing with disaster after disaster and at 4am are thinking why on earth didn't I choose medicine you've not had a real lambing placement

But if after lots of placements you still think the life is for you then go for it, you won't get in if universities didn't think you could academically handle the course so if you are given an offer they believe in you, the rest of the belief is down to you

It gives me a bit of hope that others, including you, felt the same way as I do now.
I've done work experience at a children's zoo (I was mostly at the farm animal section), a horse riding stable, lambing (unfortunately didn't have the opportunity to do night shifts for that week I was there) and a week of sheep work this summer, at the same place; some zoo stuff at park zoo and have two weeks of vet practice. I know people apply with crazy amounts of work experience, so I just hope it'll be enough as I'm about to apply this October

Anyway, thank you very much for taking your time to reply to my post and for the encouraging words, it was really helpful
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VMD100
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(Original post by siellen)
It gives me a bit of hope that others, including you, felt the same way as I do now.
I've done work experience at a children's zoo (I was mostly at the farm animal section), a horse riding stable, lambing (unfortunately didn't have the opportunity to do night shifts for that week I was there) and a week of sheep work this summer, at the same place; some zoo stuff at park zoo and have two weeks of vet practice. I know people apply with crazy amounts of work experience, so I just hope it'll be enough as I'm about to apply this October

Anyway, thank you very much for taking your time to reply to my post and for the encouraging words, it was really helpful
Under the universities you are thinking of applying to's entry requirements will be a category about work experience ensure you meet it. If you don't have dairy or beef/kennel experience you will be at a major disadvantage against others. Most uni's consider zoo experience a 'bonus' placement - it makes your application stand out but isn't considered essential
Hope this helps
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siellen
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(Original post by VMD100)
Under the universities you are thinking of applying to's entry requirements will be a category about work experience ensure you meet it. If you don't have dairy or beef/kennel experience you will be at a major disadvantage against others. Most uni's consider zoo experience a 'bonus' placement - it makes your application stand out but isn't considered essential
Hope this helps
Alright, I will look at their websites again, just to make sure. It was really useful.
Thank you
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