UKMT Thread- 2018/2019 Watch

Poll: What was your mark on this year's SMC?
40 or less (11)
6.55%
41-50 (4)
2.38%
51-60 (9)
5.36%
61-70 (16)
9.52%
71-80 (23)
13.69%
81-90 (21)
12.5%
91-100 (19)
11.31%
101-110 (32)
19.05%
111-120 (13)
7.74%
121+ (well done!) (20)
11.9%
J843126028
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#21
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#21
(Original post by jbaillie2002)
Ah. JMO was quite tricky the first time I tried it. good luck
With a bit of luck I should be able to scrape that JMO merit.
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SumOfSquares
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#22
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#22
^we got a few wrongs uns here.
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jk lol
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J843126028
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#23
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#23
(Original post by SumOfSquares)
^we got a few wrongs uns here.
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jk lol
The JMO merit is a highly coveted award, just like the IMOK merit.
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SumOfSquares
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#24
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#24
(Original post by J843126028)
The JMO merit is a highly coveted award, just like the IMOK merit.
A person of your ability should certainly put their efforts towards the most prestigious maths certification in the world - The PMC participation certificate.
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J843126028
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#25
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#25
(Original post by SumOfSquares)
A person of your ability should certainly put their efforts towards the most prestigious maths certification in the world - The PMC participation certificate.
Nah... I'm too good for that sort of thing. After redoing my GCSE English (in which I got a grade 2) your PMC participation will be nothing compared to my GCSE grade 4. Even the grade 2 I think is a much greater achievement.

(and that's not just because I was never good enough to earn one of those PMC participation awards)
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LT13
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#26
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#26
Anyone got any bright ideas for BMO1 prep? There's a load of new stuff going from IMOK to BMO1, I got a book prize last year in Maclaurin, but it's still quite a jump to BMO1 level... Is there any point in trying to learn new techniques (bar induction) that may be needed beyond IMOK? I feel like just binging past BMO1 problems aren't exactly the most efficient way forward atm and would like any advice for people who have made the jump (successfully or not)
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J843126028
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#27
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#27
(Original post by LT13)
Anyone got any bright ideas for BMO1 prep? There's a load of new stuff going from IMOK to BMO1, I got a book prize last year in Maclaurin, but it's still quite a jump to BMO1 level... Is there any point in trying to learn new techniques (bar induction) that may be needed beyond IMOK? I feel like just binging past BMO1 problems aren't exactly the most efficient way forward atm and would like any advice for people who have made the jump (successfully or not)
I prepared using mind maps and flashcards. Foundation GCSE English Language papers are also quite a useful resource.

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Binging past problems is the way to go, but don't spend time on the ones you find obvious so that you only have a success rate of around... I'd say 1/3.
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Your Local Cat
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#28
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#28
Can't wait for the annual onslaught of people making tsr accounts to post that they've gotten 110+ in the smc
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jbaillie2002
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#29
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#29
(Original post by Your Local Cat)
Can't wait for the annual onslaught of people making tsr accounts to post that they've gotten 110+ in the smc
(Original post by LT13)
Anyone got any bright ideas for BMO1 prep? There's a load of new stuff going from IMOK to BMO1, I got a book prize last year in Maclaurin, but it's still quite a jump to BMO1 level... Is there any point in trying to learn new techniques (bar induction) that may be needed beyond IMOK? I feel like just binging past BMO1 problems aren't exactly the most efficient way forward atm and would like any advice for people who have made the jump (successfully or not)
The prime Number Thereom is useful. Vieta jumping, difference of 15 cubes identity and Lagrange Multipliers can kill some problems. I got 54/60 on bmo1 last year because I wasn't able to prove the Riemann Hypothesis in time to apply it to question 1. I hope this helps- let me know if you need anything else.

also practice lots of senior kangaroo questions!
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J843126028
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#30
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#30
(Original post by jbaillie2002)
The prime Number Thereom is useful. Vieta jumping, difference of 15 cubes identity and Lagrange Multipliers can kill some problems. I got 54/60 on bmo1 last year because I wasn't able to prove the Riemann Hypothesis in time to apply it to question 1. I hope this helps- let me know if you need anything else.

also practice lots of senior kangaroo questions!
You forgot Brouwer's fixed-point theorem.
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J843126028
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#31
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#31
(Original post by Your Local Cat)
Can't wait for the annual onslaught of people making tsr accounts to post that they've gotten 110+ in the smc
Maybe there should be an SMC score spam thread where you spam your score + k, where k is the amount you add to it in the post.
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jbaillie2002
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#32
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#32
(Original post by J843126028)
You forgot Brouwer's fixed-point theorem.
oh fudgesicles!
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A02
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#33
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#33
(Original post by LT13)
Anyone got any bright ideas for BMO1 prep? There's a load of new stuff going from IMOK to BMO1, I got a book prize last year in Maclaurin, but it's still quite a jump to BMO1 level... Is there any point in trying to learn new techniques (bar induction) that may be needed beyond IMOK? I feel like just binging past BMO1 problems aren't exactly the most efficient way forward atm and would like any advice for people who have made the jump (successfully or not)
Ignore what's just been posted by J843126028 and jbaillie2002, I have no idea what they are talking about.


Honestly, just doing BMO1 problems is the way to improve. Papers earlier than 2000 are slightly different in style, so it's probably best not to spend too much time on them. There's not much theory needed, except induction, which is a fairly natural idea.

Knowing what modular arithmetic is can often make arguments a lot easier to express, and the Chinese Remainder Theorem is occasionally useful, but for BMO1 is not essential. AM-GM is worth knowing, as is the pigeonhole principle, although the pigeonhole principle is really just common sense. For geometry, power of a point comes up a lot, and knowing GCSE circle theorems is essential. It's also worth knowing what if and only if means.
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J843126028
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#34
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#34
(Original post by A02)
Ignore what's just been posted by J843126028 and jbaillie2002, I have no idea what they are talking about.


Honestly, just doing BMO1 problems is the way to improve. Papers earlier than 2000 are slightly different in style, so it's probably best not to spend too much time on them. There's not much theory needed, except induction, which is a fairly natural idea.

Knowing what modulo arithmetic is can often make arguments a lot easier to express, and the Chinese Remainder Theorem is occasionally useful, but for BMO1 is not essential. AM-GM is worth knowing, as is the pigeonhole principle, although the pigeonhole principle is really just common sense. For geometry, power of a point comes up a lot, and knowing GCSE circle theorems is essential. It's also worth knowing what if and only if means.
You mean you didn't write any formulae on flashcards?!
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jbaillie2002
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#35
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#35
(Original post by A02)
Ignore what's just been posted by J843126028 and jbaillie2002, I have no idea what they are talking about.


Honestly, just doing BMO1 problems is the way to improve. Papers earlier than 2000 are slightly different in style, so it's probably best not to spend too much time on them. There's not much theory needed, except induction, which is a fairly natural idea.

Knowing what modulo arithmetic is can often make arguments a lot easier to express, and the Chinese Remainder Theorem is occasionally useful, but for BMO1 is not essential. AM-GM is worth knowing, as is the pigeonhole principle, although the pigeonhole principle is really just common sense. For geometry, power of a point comes up a lot, and knowing GCSE circle theorems is essential. It's also worth knowing what if and only if means.
modular*.
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jbaillie2002
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#36
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#36
(Original post by A02)
Ignore what's just been posted by J843126028 and jbaillie2002, I have no idea what they are talking about.


Honestly, just doing BMO1 problems is the way to improve. Papers earlier than 2000 are slightly different in style, so it's probably best not to spend too much time on them. There's not much theory needed, except induction, which is a fairly natural idea.

Knowing what modulo arithmetic is can often make arguments a lot easier to express, and the Chinese Remainder Theorem is occasionally useful, but for BMO1 is not essential. AM-GM is worth knowing, as is the pigeonhole principle, although the pigeonhole principle is really just common sense. For geometry, power of a point comes up a lot, and knowing GCSE circle theorems is essential. It's also worth knowing what if and only if means.
how many flashcards did you make? what was the usual day like for you preparing for bmo1 last year?
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A02
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#37
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#37
(Original post by J843126028)
You mean you didn't write any formulae on flashcards?!
No, since you don't have to memorise formulae for BMO1.
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J843126028
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#38
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#38
(Original post by A02)
No, since you don't have to memorise formulae for BMO1.
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jbaillie2002
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#39
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#39
(Original post by A02)
No, since you don't have to memorise formulae for BMO1.
What formula should be memorized for bmo2
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J843126028
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#40
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#40
(Original post by jbaillie2002)
What formula should be memorized for bmo2
Not much in terms of formulae, but you need to keep your French vocabulary ticking over.
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