History post graduate degree

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Alexanderh
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Hello,
I am considering applying to do a PhD in a historical subject. I am an archaeologist by profession and academic background and have been out of university for 5 or so years. Problem is I am interested in a lot of different historical time periods, and am finding it hard to pin down a period I would like to dedicate 3/4 years of research to! I would like to know what people's favourite historical periods are and why? And if you can suggest a period that is lesser studied and is in need of some further work I would be interested to hear views. Thanks!
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04MR17
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(Original post by Alexanderh)
Hello,
I am considering applying to do a PhD in a historical subject. I am an archaeologist by profession and academic background and have been out of university for 5 or so years. Problem is I am interested in a lot of different historical time periods, and am finding it hard to pin down a period I would like to dedicate 3/4 years of research to! I would like to know what people's favourite historical periods are and why? And if you can suggest a period that is lesser studied and is in need of some further work I would be interested to hear views. Thanks!
Personally I am interested not in a specific time period but in thematic history, and moments where historical events are repetitive.

I prefer modern history to early modern or medieval, and from an archaeological background I would suggest having a look into the medieval side of things, where the two overlap much more. There are always areas for further development in History, particularly for those periods we know little about thanks to lack of evidence from the time. Less sources or materials to tell us about life there. Less archaeology really, as well as less things being passed through generations. Since the religious upheaval that occurred in Britain (for example) during the Tudor and Stuart eras, lots of pre-existing documents were destroyed. There are far more comprehensive parish records that start not long after that period has ended, which is where a lot of British social history has developed from.
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