username3934898
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What does it mean for someone to be intelligent (in your opinion)?

Is it someone who has a good work ethic or is 'school smart'? Is it someone who is 'street smart'? Or is it about personality traits - i.e someone who is logical, observant and mature?
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Lord Nutter
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Probably all of what you've said above.

Intelligence is a hard term to precisely define as many things can be associated to it.
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SyedHB
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intelligence is survival.
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username3934898
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(Original post by Lord Nutter)
Probably all of what you've said above.

Intelligence is a hard term to precisely define as many things can be associated to it.
Do you think the same applies to stupidity/other way around?

(Original post by SyedHB)
intelligence is survival.
Oh wow. That is a very interesting perspective...
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winterscoming
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Firstly, I'd think that 'intelligence' is a broad term which comes in many forms, such as emotional, logical, creative, spatial, etc.

I'd say regardless of the 'type' of intelligence, it's about the way we use information - particularly how we pick it up, how we interpret it, how we act upon it, and how we communicate with other people. Someone with whose intelligence is low in a particular area tends to function differently compared with someone whose intelligence is high in that same area.

High-intelligence tends to be associated with deeper analysis - unlikely to take information at face value nor jump to un-sound conclusions, tend to be careful, measured and considered in the way they act, and tend to take great care in the way they communicate.

Someone with low intelligence on the other hand is very likely to do the opposite - unable to see any deeper than information immediately available to them, jumping directly to conclusions or maybe even ignoring the information altogether, careless and sloppy in the way they act, and likely to be poor at that kind of communication.

Something which I find interesting is that society often places more importance on some types of intelligence rather than others - often thinking about it in terms of 'IQ' which only considers some forms of intelligence rather than others. Sometimes it's interesting to ask questions like "Who is more intelligent - Shakespeare or Einstein?" -- that's a terrible question because it's meaningless - they have different types of intelligence, but it's likely that more people would consider Einstein as being more intelligent than Shakespeare because Einstein had a high 'IQ'.
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Gent2324
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someones ability to think logically about a situation and make good decisions without needing to be told to
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randonposter7484
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(Original post by winterscoming)
Firstly, I'd think that 'intelligence' is a broad term which comes in many forms, such as emotional, logical, creative, spatial, etc.

I'd say regardless of the 'type' of intelligence, it's about the way we use information - particularly how we pick it up, how we interpret it, how we act upon it, and how we communicate with other people. Someone with whose intelligence is low in a particular area tends to function differently compared with someone whose intelligence is high in that same area.

High-intelligence tends to be associated with deeper analysis - unlikely to take information at face value nor jump to un-sound conclusions, tend to be careful, measured and considered in the way they act, and tend to take great care in the way they communicate.

Someone with low intelligence on the other hand is very likely to do the opposite - unable to see any deeper than information immediately available to them, jumping directly to conclusions or maybe even ignoring the information altogether, careless and sloppy in the way they act, and likely to be poor at that kind of communication.

Something which I find interesting is that society often places more importance on some types of intelligence rather than others - often thinking about it in terms of 'IQ' which only considers some forms of intelligence rather than others. Sometimes it's interesting to ask questions like "Who is more intelligent - Shakespeare or Einstein?" -- that's a terrible question because it's meaningless - they have different types of intelligence, but it's likely that more people would consider Einstein as being more intelligent than Shakespeare because Einstein had a high 'IQ'.
agree
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ofdro
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Intelligence is unimportant. The only thing that matters is swag.
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YeFool
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How many vine references you understand
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garythanie
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Albert Einstein once was asked "How does it feel to be the smartest man alive?" he replied "ask Tesla".
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Economics_Master
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IQ is the standard definition. Ive noticed many people with low IQ try to define it by different means.
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aggreatheabbey
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Dependson on what you're good at i guess
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Retired_Messiah
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(Original post by Economics_Master)
IQ is the standard definition. Ive noticed many people with low IQ try to define it by different means.
Quote the wikipedia page on IQ tests:
Scores from intelligence tests are estimates of intelligence. Unlike, for example, distance and mass, a concrete measure of intelligence cannot be achieved given the abstract nature of the concept of "intelligence"
It's probably worth reading this bit and onwards if one is going to take IQ as a standard perfect measure of all intellect.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_...ce_of_IQ_tests
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username3934898
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(Original post by Economics_Master)
IQ is the standard definition. Ive noticed many people with low IQ try to define it by different means.
We don't have to follow the standard definition - despite the fact that we use it as a measure. I'd like to know your perspective because after all every test is flawed and I'm sure the IQ test is biased in some ways.

(Original post by aggreatheabbey)
Dependson on what you're good at i guess
What if you're good at 'nothing' supposedly?

Let's look at the average Jo. The ordinary person who gets ordinary grades, ends up in the same 9-5 job as most adults, has a nuclear family.... would this person be considered as intelligent?
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Axiomasher
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Figuring out how to get your wi-fi printer to actually work from a chromebook.
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username3934898
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(Original post by winterscoming)
Firstly, I'd think that 'intelligence' is a broad term which comes in many forms, such as emotional, logical, creative, spatial, etc.

Someone with low intelligence on the other hand is very likely to do the opposite - unable to see any deeper than information immediately available to them, jumping directly to conclusions or maybe even ignoring the information altogether, careless and sloppy in the way they act, and likely to be poor at that kind of communication.
Just a follow up question here: do you believe intelligence can come naturally or is it a developed skill?

Thanks for providing a very thoughtful reply.

Something which I find interesting is that society often places more importance on some types of intelligence rather than others - often thinking about it in terms of 'IQ' which only considers some forms of intelligence rather than others. Sometimes it's interesting to ask questions like "Who is more intelligent - Shakespeare or Einstein?" -- that's a terrible question because it's meaningless - they have different types of intelligence, but it's likely that more people would consider Einstein as being more intelligent than Shakespeare because Einstein had a high 'IQ'.
I agree. I honestly can't imagine comparing Shakespeare and Einstein.
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winterscoming
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(Original post by rainclouds-)
Just a follow up question here: do you believe intelligence can come naturally or is it a developed skill?
Hmm, I don't believe that intelligence is pre-determined or static; anecdotally speaking, I feel that most peoples' intelligence changes an awful lot throughout their childhood and well into their adult life too. While I believe those changes slow down as we grow into adults, I think it's something which is constantly changing in each of us as we learn, have new experiences and face new challenges.

With that said, I'm sure that biology plays a part too and everyone is born with a different brain; wired up in a different way. So maybe we're born with different levels of intelligence, and that can have a significant effect on some people, but less so on others. Assuming we are born with a certain type of intelligence, I don't think that could ever be any reliable predictor of how a child might actually develop throughout their lifetime because I think there are too many other influences and variables.

So I'd lean towards it being mostly something that we develop over the course of our lives, with the caveat that everyone has a different biological starting point, and for some people that may impose some physiological limitations or provide advantages (for example, despite sometimes being unable to communicate, people with autism are often very high in logical and mathematical intelligence)

(Original post by rainclouds-)
Thanks for providing a very thoughtful reply.
Thanks for starting an interesting thread
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Nihilisticb*tch
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I don't think it can be universally defined as different people have different perceptions of what intelligence is. However I will define it broadly as this :

" the ability to think in a way that produces positive results."

That statement is broad enough to cover all different types of intelligence. If you can think in a way that yields positive results (which in most cases is in a rational way) then you are intelligent. If you can solve problems and your brain is essentially useful you are intelligent.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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(Original post by Economics_Master)
IQ is the standard definition. Ive noticed many people with low IQ try to define it by different means.
I disagree that IQ is an accurate measure of intelligence as I believe intelligence, or at least natural intelligence can not be measured or quantified. I do not have a low IQ, I haven't been tested so I am not biased in any way. I think the bias goes the other way as well, people with high IQ like to think that it's an accurate way of measuring intelligence.
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