Will i be able to achieve my dream of oxford Uni Watch

owen.winn
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Is it reasonable to aspire to apply to a university such as oxford. I got two nines at GCSE and have an A2 target of A*AAA. However i believe that the rest of my GCSE grades could hinder my application which were two 8s, four 6s and a 5. Advice from anybody with knowledge of the selection process or of A level in general would be greatly appreciated.
0
reply
Blue_Cow
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by owen.winn)
Is it reasonable to aspire to apply to a university such as oxford. I got two nines at GCSE and have an A2 target of A*AAA. However i believe that the rest of my GCSE grades could hinder my application which were two 8s, four 6s and a 5. Advice from anybody with knowledge of the selection process or of A level in general would be greatly appreciated.
Moved to University of Oxford
0
reply
OxFossil
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by owen.winn)
Is it reasonable to aspire to apply to a university such as oxford. I got two nines at GCSE and have an A2 target of A*AAA. However i believe that the rest of my GCSE grades could hinder my application which were two 8s, four 6s and a 5. Advice from anybody with knowledge of the selection process or of A level in general would be greatly appreciated.
Oxford doesn't have minimum grade requirements for GCSEs, but in practice, statistics suggest that the lower your proportion of A*s, the less likely you are to get in. This is especially marked for some sujects like medicine, where virtually no-one with fewer than 7 or 8 A*s (old style) is offered a place. The other point is that they ask for predicted A level grades rathe than 'targets' (if those are your predictions, they will be OK for many subjects).

So your chances depend in part on the subject you wish to study. If if includes an entrance exam (like the BMAT), you may have a chance if you do very well in that and have an outstanding PS.

It's difficult to be more precise on the basis of the info you provide, but one thing you could do is to google Freedom of Information responses (for example at the 'what do they know?' site) and look for the many, many answers Oxford gives to students asking for these kind of statistics in subject specific detail every year.
4
reply
Doones
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by owen.winn)
Is it reasonable to aspire to apply to a university such as oxford. I got two nines at GCSE and have an A2 target of A*AAA. However i believe that the rest of my GCSE grades could hinder my application which were two 8s, four 6s and a 5. Advice from anybody with knowledge of the selection process or of A level in general would be greatly appreciated.
Which course are you considering? For most courses your GCSEs aren't as important as some people think.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Realitysreflexx
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
If Oxford is your dream and destiny nothing will hold you back, make a good application and you will end up exactly where you are supposed to be. A Level predictions are often weighted higher and your differentation of product (everyone else will have similar qualfications) is your personal statement, and then ultimately your interview process.
2
reply
Doones
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
your differentation of product (everyone else will have similar qualfications) is your personal statement, and then ultimately your interview process.
Nope. For most Oxford courses the main initial "differentiation of product" (what a weird phrase to use) is having the course's required A-level subjects and then the score in the admissions test. The PS is rarely a major factor in their interview shortlisting criteria.

Posted from TSR Mobile
1
reply
Realitysreflexx
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by Doonesbury)
Nope. For most Oxford courses the main initial "differentiation of product" (what a weird phrase to use) is having the course's required A-level subjects and then the score in the admissions test. The PS is rarely a major factor in their interview shortlisting criteria.

Posted from TSR Mobile
Ahh so now universities don't read p.s.

Fine OP write to the university of Oxford a one liner saying you love Oxford,

Differentiation of product, is a business term. Likely not something a non realist like yourself would embrace. Because ultimately your trying to sell yourself to a university to give you a place, especially at the reputable ones, which Oxford definitely is.
2
reply
Doones
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Ahh so now universities don't read p.s.

Fine OP write to the university of Oxford a one liner saying you love Oxford
Did I say that?

Posted from TSR Mobile
1
reply
Reality Check
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Ahh so now universities don't read p.s.

Fine OP write to the university of Oxford a one liner saying you love Oxford,

Differentiation of product, is a business term. Likely not something a non realist like yourself would embrace. Because ultimately your trying to sell yourself to a university to give you a place, especially at the reputable ones, which Oxford definitely is.
Doonesbury didn't say 'Oxford doesn't read PSs': he said it 'was rarely a major factor'. Which is entirely correct.

You are not 'selling a product' to Oxford. This is not The Apprentice. You are engaging in a holistic application process where some factors are ascribed greater weight than others. The PS is something which is not a deciding factor in any application - they all tend to say the same things, and are often not very relevant at a university like Oxford, who interviews all applicants and thus get a chance to find out all the guff that populates a PS in person.

owen.winn - it's worth remembering that Oxford selects via shortlisting (rather than Cambridge's deselection method) - excellent predicted/acheived results and a good admissions test is the key.
0
reply
vicvic38
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
Well, to put in my two cents, I would say that it entirely depends on the course, and that GCSEs are never the objective factor you think they are. They tend to be a subjective factor, taken in context with how your school generally performs. If your school generally doesn't do well at GCSE (surprisingly few passes in both English and Maths at GCSE) then your grades may be respectable. If you go to a school were everyone passes, and gets at least a B, then your grades are less impressive. However 3 A*, which is what your 2 8s and your 9 are, are nothing to be scoffed at.

However, there is no point in not aspiring to Oxford. in fact, given it takes up only one place on your UCAS, go for it. Throw yourself at it. I went into the process thinking I wouldn't even get to interview, and I was quite pleasantly surprised when I got a place. Worst that can happen is that you don't get in. If you get rejected at interview, at least you got a night or two in Oxford, and you got to meet people from your course.
4
reply
Zaporizhia
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Ahh so now universities don't read p.s.

Fine OP write to the university of Oxford a one liner saying you love Oxford,

Differentiation of product, is a business term. Likely not something a non realist like yourself would embrace. Because ultimately your trying to sell yourself to a university to give you a place, especially at the reputable ones, which Oxford definitely is.
It's of 'medium' importance in their selection criteria when I looked on their website, as they interview . I think it holds much more weighting at other top unis though, especially LSE, as it's virtually the only other part of your application apart from GCSEs and predicted/achieved grades.
0
reply
Realitysreflexx
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
(Original post by Zaporizhia)
It's of 'medium' importance in their selection criteria when I looked on their website, as they interview . I think it holds much more weighting at other top unis though, especially LSE, as it's virtually the only other part of your application apart from GCSEs and predicted/achieved grades.
Medium can make or break you, and likely still holds more weighting then your GCSE's since those can be overpowered by A level predictions. I personally haven't seen or heard anything pointing the other direction that the PS is irrelevant. So like i said i would love to kmow if a poorly crafted p.s. would be overpowered by just grades alone???

Dont think anyone can answer this so to not advise students to not put in a decent amount of work in an application including a p.s. is silly and misguided. You should treat all elements of your application.
0
reply
Zaporizhia
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Medium can make or break you, and likely still holds more weighting then your GCSE's since those can be overpowered by A level predictions. I personally haven't seen or heard anything pointing the other direction that the PS is irrelevant. So like i said i would love to kmow if a poorly crafted p.s. would be overpowered by just grades alone???

Dont think anyone can answer this so to not advise students to not put in a decent amount of work in an application including a p.s. is silly and misguided. You should treat all elements of your application.
Yeah, I agree, everything pretty much has to be perfect. I guess the ps is a good way to display your thought process ahead of being selected for an interview too, so I agree 100% tbh.
1
reply
Iconic_panda
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
this may be said before but GCSE grades are relative to your school. For instance, if your GCSEs are excellent compared to your school but okay compared to, let say, private school, the university will take it into consideration. It's also depending your course whether or not PS is valued and valued to what extent. As long as you can show your passion for the course I think you will have a good shot, best of luck!
2
reply
Zaporizhia
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
(Original post by Iconic_panda)
this may be said before but GCSE grades are relative to your school. For instance, if your GCSEs are excellent compared to your school but okay compared to, let say, private school, the university will take it into consideration. It's also depending your course whether or not PS is valued and valued to what extent. As long as you can show your passion for the course I think you will have a good shot, best of luck!
Does this count for A levels too? I went to a grammar school and got AAA, but I was only one of 20 (out of 250) to get AAA+. It's also in an underprivileged area, despite being a grammar school.
0
reply
TheTroll73
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 year ago
#16
nah man your GCSE's aren't that important to oxford
0
reply
Muttley79
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
(Original post by owen.winn)
Is it reasonable to aspire to apply to a university such as oxford. I got two nines at GCSE and have an A2 target of A*AAA. However i believe that the rest of my GCSE grades could hinder my application which were two 8s, four 6s and a 5. Advice from anybody with knowledge of the selection process or of A level in general would be greatly appreciated.
It's very early days and targets are NOT predictions. You'll need to see how you get on in Year 12 and what you predicted grades are like next July. Make sure you research the course you are looking at to see what will make your application stand out.
0
reply
auburnstar
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 year ago
#18
from a simpler perspective, give it your best shot. you have nothing to lose except a couple of days for interviewing (of which realistically only 2-3 hours will be interviews at most), time spent on the application for the submitted work and the money to apply to UCAS. which is in the grand scheme really nothing.

it sounds cliche but you really don't know until you try. believe in yourself, give it a go and see what happens. if you don't try your probability of success if 0%. maybe you will get in, maybe you won't, it is impossible for anyone to ultimately know because there are so many factors.

if you try and don't get in, you'll have had the unique experience (something which very few people have had in reality despite how TSR makes it seems sometimes) and you will go somewhere else better suited to you as a student and most likely do pretty cool things there. if you do get in, you'll be very glad you tried. no regrets either way. sounds like a win-win situation in my book.

[insert 'just do it' meme here]
2
reply
Beth_H
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#19
Report 1 year ago
#19
(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Medium can make or break you, and likely still holds more weighting then your GCSE's since those can be overpowered by A level predictions. I personally haven't seen or heard anything pointing the other direction that the PS is irrelevant. So like i said i would love to kmow if a poorly crafted p.s. would be overpowered by just grades alone???

Dont think anyone can answer this so to not advise students to not put in a decent amount of work in an application including a p.s. is silly and misguided. You should treat all elements of your application.
To add to this, it's also worth noting that, while the PS on its own may be medium or low priority (depending on the course), it can also form the basis for interview questions, so it's worth taking time over to make sure you know it well enough to be prepared to talk confidently about it.
0
reply
owen.winn
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#20
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#20
(Original post by Iconic_panda)
this may be said before but GCSE grades are relative to your school. For instance, if your GCSEs are excellent compared to your school but okay compared to, let say, private school, the university will take it into consideration. It's also depending your course whether or not PS is valued and valued to what extent. As long as you can show your passion for the course I think you will have a good shot, best of luck!
My school averages pretty poor results as it is a state school in an area of council estates, I did the best in my school and sized up pretty well to some of the county's best students
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Oxford
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 20 Sep '19

What's your favourite genre?

Rock (206)
23.57%
Pop (216)
24.71%
Jazz (33)
3.78%
Classical (49)
5.61%
Hip-Hop (167)
19.11%
Electronic (60)
6.86%
Indie (143)
16.36%

Watched Threads

View All