Nmys
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I think it's fair to assume quite a lot of postgrad Master's students may be considering working/do work during their studies to get a bit of extra income and boost experience.

But how much do people work? Masters are meant to be intense, but how much can someone work whilst studying until it becomes too much work? I've heard some people work full-time and still manage to make it all happen - but is that too much if Master's workload is really high?

What does everyone think? Any personal experiences are also welcome
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Duncan2012
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Are you asking this because of your own situation?

FWIW I didn’t work during my full-time masters, neither did any of my peers.
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Nmys
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(Original post by Duncan2012)
Are you asking this because of your own situation?

FWIW I didn’t work during my full-time masters, neither did any of my peers.
Partly personal, partly curiosity, as unis make it seem like it's impossible to work at the same time as the course is so demanding, so I wonder if that is the reality?
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by Nmys)
I think it's fair to assume quite a lot of postgrad Master's students may be considering working/do work during their studies to get a bit of extra income and boost experience.

But how much do people work? Masters are meant to be intense, but how much can someone work whilst studying until it becomes too much work? I've heard some people work full-time and still manage to make it all happen - but is that too much if Master's workload is really high?

What does everyone think? Any personal experiences are also welcome
A master's degree is either 1) very intense from the get-go, or 2) gets more intense as the year goes on, so even if it doesn't seem that hard to begin with, don't get a false sense of security!

I know at least 4 people who worked during their master's, but they were in the minority tbh. A few of them even quit working to work on their dissertation full-time towards the end.

One of those people in particular found that their job became less flexible over time, so they found it very taxing on their mental health to try to write and submit assignments on time while unexpectedly being told to work multiple shifts a week at short notice.

The takeaway from their experience is to either not work if you don't need to, or find a job that is flexible/allow you to work as little or as much as you want. One person I know taught English online, so he could choose his own working hours.
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Notoriety
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For me, depends on how easy your master's is. Ordinarily it is a bad idea.
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The Empire Odyssey
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(Original post by Nmys)
I think it's fair to assume quite a lot of postgrad Master's students may be considering working/do work during their studies to get a bit of extra income and boost experience.

But how much do people work? Masters are meant to be intense, but how much can someone work whilst studying until it becomes too much work? I've heard some people work full-time and still manage to make it all happen - but is that too much if Master's workload is really high?

What does everyone think? Any personal experiences are also welcome
I don't think it's common for post-grad students to work in the same industry that their degree will lead them into. I mean, that's the whole point of doing your master's. Internships or work experience could be feasible if you can fit it in the right time during your degree; perhaps during holidays or something.

I'm going to try and keep my PT job down because I need the extra income really. Masters are intense, but I spoke to someone who did one and he said if you applied yourself at UG and apply yourself at PG, then the latter isn't going to be harder than your UG. Which makes sense in a way. But it depends on your experience at UG. In terms of deadlines, my UG looks the same as my PG in terms of word count and whatnot. They are different subjects, but again, if you apply yourself - I think you'll be OK.

Some people do FT work and then PT masters. Others like myself, will do PT work and FT masters, working 12 hours a week. the masters is roughly about 7 hrs contact time and about 20 hrs non-contact time per week. So 40 hrs a week roughly is a little rough, but no harder than a FT grad job that has 36 hrs, plus overtime.

But again, it depends on the job you want to do whilst doing your masters. If you really need the money, just get any ol' job. If it's to boost your career prospects, perhaps consider doing the masters PT.
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jlg44
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I am currently working a full-time job while studying my MSc in Civil Engineering. But this is not a full-time degree. I am on my first of 2 (possibly even 3) years of study. I go into university 1 day a week in term time and work the other 4. The difference I have is that I do work in the civil engineering industry, so my work is directly relevant to the majority of my degree. I would really struggle if my work
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Parkleton
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I worked part time from September-May (around 12-15 hours a week) and then landed a full-time job in my field over the summer, which I started at the beginning of August. I'll have been in the full-time post for nearly 2 months when I submit my dissertation next week.

I still have a lot of my dissertation left to do, although my supervisor isn't concerned about it, but I definitely think putting so much on my plate has created an unnecessarily stressful year for me. If you can avoid it, don't work.
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chaotic1328
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Most universities will tell you that their Masters' are super intense, the reality, from personal experience, is somewhat different. Yes, Masters' can be very intense, but only if you go through the recommended reading list with a fine tooth comb. You can certainly get very decent grades just by focusing on the essentials with good time management, which will allow you free time for part time work.

I did my full time Master's whilst working 60 hours a week due to a change of circumstances, and I didn't want to either switch to part time or withdraw from the course. I wouldn't recommend anyone trying to do the same, as this is can be very stressful, though I didn't find it so. However, I'd say that 15-20 hours a week of part time work is very doable.

As for the 'high' workload, I'd say that with an average of 6 contact hours per week, six 400-word assignments and a dissertation (in the case of Newcastle, Leeds only requires four 4000-word assignments and a dissertation), an English MA is probably easy when compared to the US system.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by chaotic1328)
Most universities will tell you that their Masters' are super intense, the reality, from personal experience, is somewhat different. Yes, Masters' can be very intense, but only if you go through the recommended reading list with a fine tooth comb. You can certainly get very decent grades just by focusing on the essentials with good time management, which will allow you free time for part time work.

I did my full time Master's whilst working 60 hours a week due to a change of circumstances, and I didn't want to either switch to part time or withdraw from the course. I wouldn't recommend anyone trying to do the same, as this is can be very stressful, though I didn't find it so. However, I'd say that 15-20 hours a week of part time work is very doable.

As for the 'high' workload, I'd say that with an average of 6 contact hours per week, six 400-word assignments and a dissertation (in the case of Newcastle, Leeds only requires four 4000-word assignments and a dissertation), an English MA is probably easy when compared to the US system.
Not everyone does politics, though.
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chaotic1328
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Not everyone does politics, though.
Ah, hello dear resident troll. I did stress that what I had written was based on personal experience. What is your point?

Also, have you any data to back-up your implied assertion that an MA in Politics is easier than a Master's in the other social science or humanities?
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Notoriety
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(Original post by chaotic1328)
Ah, hello dear resident troll. I did stress that what I had written was based on personal experience. What is your point?

Also, have you any data to back-up your implied assertion that an MA in Politics is easier than a Master's in the other social science or humanities?
You said it was based on personal experience to explain that your account was correct. It was not to qualify your account.

Different subjects, at different unis, are going to have different degrees of intensity.
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chaotic1328
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(Original post by Notoriety)
You said it was based on personal experience to explain that your account was correct. It was not to qualify your account.

Different subjects, at different unis, are going to have different degrees of intensity.
Of course my account is correct, for me. It was based on my personal experience, after all.

How do you know that I wasn't qualifying my account by stating that it was based on personal experience? Has our resident troll branched out to mind-reading now?

'Different subjects, at different unis, are going to have different degrees of intensity.' LOL. Yes, and we know that mothers are usually female, the sun is hot etc. What is your point? Of course different courses from different universities would differ in their intensity, but where are your data to back-up your implied assertion that an MA in International Politics from Newcastle is easier, or less intense, than the average MA?
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Notoriety
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(Original post by chaotic1328)
Of course my account is correct, for me. It was based on my personal experience, after all.

How do you know that I wasn't qualifying my account by stating that it was based on personal experience? Has our resident troll branched out to mind-reading now?

'Different subjects, at different unis, are going to have different degrees of intensity.' LOL. Yes, and we know that mothers are usually female, the sun is hot etc. What is your point? Of course different courses from different universities would differ in their intensity, but where are your data to back-up your implied assertion that an MA in International Politics from Newcastle is easier, or less intense, than the average MA?
Didn't imply that.
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chaotic1328
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(Original post by Notoriety)
Didn't imply that.
'Not everyone does politics, though.'

Then I can only bow to your mastery in the use of the English Language. Because that sentence looks suspiciously like that was what you were implying.
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HappyBuddah
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It's difficult not to work whilst studying, the Graduate Loan doesn't cover all of the fees on some courses so there's no other option unless if you want to eat/pay rent/pay bills. Scholarships are few and far between so can't be relied on.

I'm on a full time LPC/LLM. It's 2 days a week in Uni, I do shift work from home during some evenings, all weekend and for 1 afternoon (when I'm not in Uni), so it should work out OK. In my 'free' time and in between shifts I'll study and do prep for my Uni days, I usually manage my time really well (do the groceries online to save time etc) anyway so it's just a different set of balls to juggle. If I want a day off I can take a holiday day off work so I'll still get paid. I think your query depends on the course that you're doing, your prior experience, and the type of job you'll be doing. I couldn't manage to do this if I had a traditional 9-5 Mon-Fri job, working evenings can be tiring but I've been doing my job for so long I know what's expected of me so I'm fast. I earn a fairly decent hourly wage (above minimum wage) so I don't have to work a great deal to cover my bills, which helps, I'm also really use to working 40/50 hours a week so taking time off to go to Uni or to study feels like a break.

I'll let you know how things go in a month, if I'm not around then it's because I've had some sort of melt down and I've thrown both my job and my course in.
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Notoriety
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(Original post by HappyBuddah)
It's difficult not to work whilst studying, the Graduate Loan doesn't cover all of the fees on some courses so there's no other option unless if you want to eat/pay rent/pay bills. Scholarships are few and far between so can't be relied on.

I'm on a full time LPC/LLM. It's 2 days a week in Uni, I do shift work from home during some evenings, all weekend and for 1 afternoon (when I'm not in Uni), so it should work out OK. In my 'free' time and in between shifts I'll study and do prep for my Uni days, I usually manage my time really well (do the groceries online to save time etc) anyway so it's just a different set of balls to juggle. If I want a day off I can take a holiday day off work so I'll still get paid. I think your query depends on the course that you're doing, your prior experience, and the type of job you'll be doing. I couldn't manage to do this if I had a traditional 9-5 Mon-Fri job, working evenings can be tiring but I've been doing my job for so long I know what's expected of me so I'm fast. I earn a fairly decent hourly wage (above minimum wage) so I don't have to work a great deal to cover my bills, which helps, I'm also really use to working 40/50 hours a week so taking time off to go to Uni or to study feels like a break.

I'll let you know how things go in a month, if I'm not around then it's because I've had some sort of melt down and I've thrown both my job and my course in.
It's 24th of Sept? How are you on a 1-year FT course still? Are you just at the beginning of it?

In that case, you don't really know how you're going to cope. The LPC is slightly more straightforward than the traditional masters, so I think you should be fine. But it doesn't mean people on other course types would be, of course.

LPC is particularly tricky re funding, because you only get PG loan for LLM. The LLMs with LPC take up 10k usually -- all of it gone. Other master's types outside of London can be 6-7k, so if you get a scholarship you can almost manage.
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Secretariat123
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(Original post by Nmys)
I think it's fair to assume quite a lot of postgrad Master's students may be considering working/do work during their studies to get a bit of extra income and boost experience.

But how much do people work? Masters are meant to be intense, but how much can someone work whilst studying until it becomes too much work? I've heard some people work full-time and still manage to make it all happen - but is that too much if Master's workload is really high?

What does everyone think? Any personal experiences are also welcome
I done a Masters in Middle East Politics at SOAS and had plenty of time during it to work, my timetable was somewhat open and I remember having one or two days off a week! So I was able to work and still get a distinction. So yeah like everyone else said it depends on the course and Uni...
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