What even is active transport

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Msbrownie.xo
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#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
I don't get active transport I get it goes against the concentration gradient an der goes requires oxygen from respiration but I don't understand how it works in the body could someone help me by explaining it. I've check YouTube and that science guy that wears a suit but I'm stuck
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Raen
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#2
(I'm bad at explaining, sorry)

So the definition of active transport is: the process by which dissolved molecules molecules move across a cell membrane from an area of low concentration to high concentration

As it's higher -> lower concentration the molecules are going against the concentration gradient. In the cell, there's the semi-permeable cell membrane separating the inside of the cell and outside, so in the case of active transport there's more molecules inside the cell than there is outside the cell on the other side of the membrane. Quite often a cell will need something that it must actively transport to sustain life, but it's against the concentration gradient so active transport uses energy. For example, in plants root hair cells use active transport. The root hair cell takes mineral ions (like nitrates) up from the soil. This is vital so that the plants get the ions they need to survive from the soil, even though the soil has a lower concentration of ions than the plant. To do this the plant uses energy, the energy is produced during cellular respiration (Glucose is broken down in the presence of oxygen to produce carbon dioxide, water and energy) and the same story is true in the body, where active transport is used during digestion when the glucose is moved using active transport into the villi.
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Msbrownie.xo
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#3
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by Raen)
(I'm bad at explaining, sorry)

So the definition of active transport is: the process by which dissolved molecules molecules move across a cell membrane from an area of low concentration to high concentration

As it's higher -> lower concentration the molecules are going against the concentration gradient. In the cell, there's the semi-permeable cell membrane separating the inside of the cell and outside, so in the case of active transport there's more molecules inside the cell than there is outside the cell on the other side of the membrane. Quite often a cell will need something that it must actively transport to sustain life, but it's against the concentration gradient so active transport uses energy. For example, in plants root hair cells use active transport. The root hair cell takes mineral ions (like nitrates) up from the soil. This is vital so that the plants get the ions they need to survive from the soil, even though the soil has a lower concentration of ions than the plant. To do this the plant uses energy, the energy is produced during cellular respiration (Glucose is broken down in the presence of oxygen to produce carbon dioxide, water and energy) and the same story is true in the body, where active transport is used during digestion when the glucose is moved using active transport into the villi.
Thank you so much, I should be a teacher for real lmao
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