It doesn’t matter what university you go to. Watch

angelinahx
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I have to rant. I have to get this off of my chest because there are so many of you, especially on here, who start stressing over university applications and predicted grades before you’ve even entered sixth form. So many of you spend your summers studying and “preparing” for the next year to “get ahead” for university. So many of you are young and underage and live with your parents and have your mental health compromised as a result of stressing over university and outdated and misinformed information.

The truth is that university has lost its relevance. League tables don’t matter anymore. You are not guaranteed a job just because you went to a top university. This is especially true in London. I’m 18 and I live by myself in London and I work part-time as a barista. My coworker is 24 and has a BA from UCL. He works part-time and makes as much as I do whilst working five different part-time gigs to make ends meet.

I know secretaries who graduated from Cambridge. I know team members with business degrees. I know waitresses and sales associates with university degrees. I also know 22 year old Soho bankers who didn’t go to university. I know 27 year olds who make enough money to travel the world with a HNC from their local college and district managers with degrees from Manchester Metropolitan.

Everybody has a degree in London. You going to UCL does not make you stand out from the crowd and you are not special just because you went to York or Manchester or Bristol or UCL like you were 15 or 20 years ago. Apart from an initial “oh wow”, your degree has no significance in the real world and employers certainly don’t care whether you went to UCL or Surrey or Sussex. What matters is your experience. Your personality and your ability to learn new things instead of copying them from a textbook.

So many of you are tragically misinformed and you’re compromising some of the best years of your entire life based upon that.
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Sinnoh
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Well no it doesn't matter, if you don't make good use of your time at uni. This is especially important with non-vocational degrees.
But besides, Cambridge seems like a very nice place to be for 4 years and if I think I'm capable of getting a place there without losing my mind, why shouldn't I try?
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quirky editor
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(Original post by angelinahx)
I have to rant. I have to get this off of my chest because there are so many of you, especially on here, who start stressing over university applications and predicted grades before you’ve even entered sixth form. So many of you spend your summers studying and “preparing” for the next year to “get ahead” for university. So many of you are young and underage and live with your parents and have your mental health compromised as a result of stressing over university and outdated and misinformed information.

.
not entirely true but I agree attitudes are changing.League tables are a new thing. The uni still is judged as ever, maybe not as much. He had a BA, no one said they grantee jobs (straw man fallacy if you are trying to imply that is the argument). Do the best you can but don't be disheartened if you don't get the grades.
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angelinahx
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
Well no it doesn't matter, if you don't make good use of your time at uni. This is especially important with non-vocational degrees.
But besides, Cambridge seems like a very nice place to be for 4 years and if I think I'm capable of getting a place there without losing my mind, why shouldn't I try?
Of course you should try if you want to, but you need to be realistic. You are not guaranteed a high-paying job just because you went to a Russell Group university or Oxbridge. You might get the initial “wow” reaction, but that will not inherently land you a job. This is true for our generation in the West in general and is not solely a British phenomenon. Over 40% of American college graduates work in jobs that do not require a university degree. This is especially true in more competitive cities such as New York and London. Go for it and try your hardest, but you’re not inherently better off than someone else with the same degree from a worse university with more experience than you.
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angelinahx
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(Original post by quirky editor)
not entirely true but I agree attitudes are changing.League tables are a new thing. The uni still is judged as ever, maybe not as much. He had a BA, no one said they grantee jobs (straw man fallacy if you are trying to imply that is the argument). Do the best you can but don't be disheartened if you don't get the grades.
It is, true, though. The university is “judged” but that has no relevance within the context of you finding employment. There are bankers (I know them personally) who didn’t go to university and who are younger than my 24 year old barista colleague. You are not guaranteed a job like you were 20 years ago.
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JohanGRK
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(Original post by angelinahx)
I have to rant. I have to get this off of my chest because there are so many of you, especially on here, who start stressing over university applications and predicted grades before you’ve even entered sixth form. So many of you spend your summers studying and “preparing” for the next year to “get ahead” for university. So many of you are young and underage and live with your parents and have your mental health compromised as a result of stressing over university and outdated and misinformed information.

The truth is that university has lost its relevance. League tables don’t matter anymore. You are not guaranteed a job just because you went to a top university. This is especially true in London. I’m 18 and I live by myself in London and I work part-time as a barista. My coworker is 24 and has a BA from UCL. He works part-time and makes as much as I do whilst working five different part-time gigs to make ends meet.

I know secretaries who graduated from Cambridge. I know team members with business degrees. I know waitresses and sales associates with university degrees. I also know 22 year old Soho bankers who didn’t go to university. I know 27 year olds who make enough money to travel the world with a HNC from their local college and district managers with degrees from Manchester Metropolitan.

Everybody has a degree in London. You going to UCL does not make you stand out from the crowd and you are not special just because you went to York or Manchester or Bristol or UCL like you were 15 or 20 years ago. Apart from an initial “oh wow”, your degree has no significance in the real world and employers certainly don’t care whether you went to UCL or Surrey or Sussex. What matters is your experience. Your personality and your ability to learn new things instead of copying them from a textbook.

So many of you are tragically misinformed and you’re compromising some of the best years of your entire life based upon that.
"Soho bankers" lol

The problem with your thesis is that you clearly have no experience of applying to or working at high-flying careers. So you can't appreciate that the careers offered by a university extend beyond its name, probably because you have never needed to access these benefits. I would have expected a greater hesitation to generalise from an old and mature person such as yourself.

No one has ever argued that going to university guarantees you anything.
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PetrolHead26
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Sometimes degrees don't matter but 98% of times I think an employer would pick a person who went to Cambridge over London Met.
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quirky editor
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(Original post by angelinahx)
It is, true, though. The university is “judged” but that has no relevance within the context of you finding employment. There are bankers (I know them personally) who didn’t go to university and who are younger than my 24 year old barista colleague. You are not guaranteed a job like you were 20 years ago.
Wow I would have expected bankers to have at least a degree. Did they to an internship or something?
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quirky editor
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Is Manchester Metropolitan known outside of Manchester?
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angelinahx
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
"Soho bankers" lol

The problem with your thesis is that you clearly have no experience of applying to or working at high-flying careers. So you can't appreciate that the careers offered by a university extend beyond its name, probably because you have never needed to access these benefits. I would have expected a greater hesitation to generalise from an old and mature person such as yourself.

No one has ever argued that going to university guarantees you anything.
I’m genuinely laughing. Do you feel personally attacked? I know bankers who work in Tottenham Court Road (which... is Soho) who are 22 year olds and who didn’t go to university and are making far more money than my UCL friend who was too busy studying to learn about the world around him. I’ve no personal experience, but I’m fully capable of listening to other people’s experiences and looking at fundamental statistics. There is an incredible amount of graduates who work in jobs which do not require a college degree and for many high-paying jobs, you don’t even need one. Your personality and your experience is what gets you hired, not “i went to x university”. That has no relevance in large cities because there are so many who all went to RG unis all competing for the same jobs, and it loses its relevance as a result.
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angelinahx
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(Original post by PetrolHead26)
Sometimes degrees don't matter but 98% of times I think an employer would pick a person who went to Cambridge over London Met.
This only applies if they both have an equal amount of experience in the field. You see, the problem with Cambridge degrees (as with all degrees in general) is that they’re theoretical. Having a BSc in Business Management does not inherently make you good at generating profit for a corporation. Your social skills and your innovation do. The main problem is that whilst A* students are busy studying to get a First from Oxford, they’re missing out on fundamental life experience which employers value so highly.
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JohanGRK
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(Original post by angelinahx)
I’m genuinely laughing. Do you feel personally attacked? I know bankers who work in Tottenham Court Road (which... is Soho) who are 22 year olds and who didn’t go to university and are making far more money than my UCL friend who was too busy studying to learn about the world around him. I’ve no personal experience, but I’m fully capable of listening to other people’s experiences and looking at fundamental statistics. There is an incredible amount of graduates who work in jobs which do not require a college degree and for many high-paying jobs, you don’t even need one. Your personality and your experience is what gets you hired, not “i went to x university”. That has no relevance in large cities because there are so many who all went to RG unis all competing for the same jobs, and it loses its relevance as a result.
Why would I feel attacked when I've used the benefits offered by my university to their max and secured my grad job?

I'm not entirely sure as to what sort of 'bankers' these lads are, but they're working in the wrong place. The real action is to be found to their east. And to get a slice of that action, you'll need a pretty good degree. Not daddy's connections.

Which high-paying jobs don't require a degree?

If you looked at the 'fundamental statistics', you'd have realised that the universities that are traditionally seen as 'top' in this country have graduates that earn a considerable amount about both the median graduate salary and the average salary for school leavers. But I guess that you were too distracted by your 'experiences' to do any research.

Again, your belief that 'RG status' and the university 'brand' are the only advantages a university offers you vis-a-vis other universities and school leavers only proves my point about you generalising about things you've never experienced.
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PetrolHead26
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(Original post by angelinahx)
This only applies if they both have an equal amount of experience in the field. You see, the problem with Cambridge degrees (as with all degrees in general) is that they’re theoretical. Having a BSc in Business Management does not inherently make you good at generating profit for a corporation. Your social skills and your innovation do. The main problem is that whilst A* students are busy studying to get a First from Oxford, they’re missing out on fundamental life experience which employers value so highly.
Well if u comparing degrees then don't add **** like experience.. On its own, some degrees are more valuable than others. Only in medicine and Dentistry the uni you don't matter.
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3pointonefour
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I don't want to go to university solely to land a job, I want to study at university because I love learning and want to do what I enjoy to the highest level I can do it at.
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ltsmith
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Go on linkedin and tell me how many analysts at buldge brackets like goldman and morgan stanley are from MMU

now tell me how many are from oxbridge and imperial/lse

I'm not being snobby, but it's foolish to claim there's no relationship between university status and career opportunities
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hanley9
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To say it doesn't matter, is naive.
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rockrunride
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Utterly true.

Wish I had gone to uni armed with the knowledge I have now. To earn well, you need to have a bit about you. University helps, but it's far from a magic wand.

Actually, seeing as I did humanities, I probably wouldn't even have gone.
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999tigger
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(Original post by JohanGRK)
"Soho bankers" lol

The problem with your thesis is that you clearly have no experience of applying to or working at high-flying careers. So you can't appreciate that the careers offered by a university extend beyond its name, probably because you have never needed to access these benefits. I would have expected a greater hesitation to generalise from an old and mature person such as yourself.

No one has ever argued that going to university guarantees you anything.
Jusr lol. Trying to resist. Stop me. Wont let me rep you. Fight the good fight.
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katf
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(Original post by PetrolHead26)
Sometimes degrees don't matter but 98% of times I think an employer would pick a person who went to Cambridge over London Met.
In what scenario? If I'm choosing a teacher, I want someone well-rounded and able to explain clearly. I want someone with a lot of life experience. A 22 year old who's done a theoretical degree at Cambridge then a PGCE because they didn't know what else to do isn't going to get the job. The London Met graduate who's had a bit more life experience and hasn't been sheltered will get the job.
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iElvendork
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I find it funny when people think universities will care about their C in geography. As long as you have English and maths at level GCSE then most courses will take you

I was never obsessed with league tables. I picked my uni choices based on distance from my hometown (had be within a 90 minute drive) and suitable for my grade predictions of AAB/ABB. Went on an open day to Leeds, fell in love, spent 4 years there doing my integrated masters and now I'm starting my PhD. Probably would have done the same at any university in the country that offers a degree in chemistry

My sixth form tried to push me to apply to oxbridge when I first started in year 12 because my GCSE's were the 'right profile'. But I refused. Didn't even know what I wanted to study at that point, and I didn't like the study culture and mentality of the university. I got a 1st from Leeds, but I also went to bed at a reasonable hour each night and on the rest I partied away with my friends.
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