czardasz
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would it be possible to successfully complete a biochemistry degree without having studied Biology at A level, but having studied maths, fm, physics and german, as a lot of universities don't state it as a requirement?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Mikolaj1109)
would it be possible to successfully complete a biochemistry degree without having studied Biology at A level, but having studied maths, fm, physics and german, as a lot of universities don't state it as a requirement?
Chemistry and maths are far more important for entry to biochemistry than Biology. You've got the maths requirement, but the lack of Chemistry is going to be a problem.
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czardasz
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Chemistry and maths are far more important for success at biochemistry than Biology. You've got the maths requirement, but the lack of Chemistry is going to be a problem.
sorry i forgot to mention, I am also studying chemistry at A level, didn't realise that i hadn't mentioned it. I am mainly considering Natural Sciences at Cambridge, but biochemistry is something that has recently started to interest me.
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(Original post by Mikolaj1109)
sorry i forgot to mention, I am also studying chemistry at A level, didn't realise that i hadn't mentioned it. I am mainly considering Natural Sciences at Cambridge, but biochemistry is something that has recently started to interest me.
So is that five A levels that you're studying, physics, maths, FM, chemistry and German?

As you probably know, you can't study 'biochemistry' to begin with in NatSci, but you can do Cells at IA, BMB for IB, and then Biochemistry as a part II. The options might have changed since I did it, but the scheme is basically the same.
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czardasz
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Reality Check yes, that's what I'm doing however i am completing the german A level a year early, and self studying fm AS level. Yeah the subjects im considering for natsci are maths, chemistry, physics and biology of cells, with then looking to specialise into whichever subject i prefer, which could be biochemistry as I am finding that field very interesting and am planning to attend the cambridge masterclasses fir both physics and biochemistry.
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(Original post by Mikolaj1109)
Reality Check yes, that's what I'm doing however i am completing the german A level a year early, and self studying fm AS level. Yeah the subjects im considering for natsci are maths, chemistry, physics and biology of cells, with then looking to specialise into whichever subject i prefer, which could be biochemistry as I am finding that field very interesting and am planning to attend the cambridge masterclasses fir both physics and biochemistry.
OK. For NatSci, this is one of the few courses and universities where four A levels, including FM, is an advantage. In all other cases, I'd suggest you concentrate on doing three excellently.

Your choices are ideal - they allow you to apply for both physical and biological NatSci. Please refer to the many Cambridge admissions threads, including the University of Cambridge, Cambridge Courses and Cambridge Colleges
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username2858058
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Chemistry and maths are far more important for success at biochemistry than Biology. You've got the maths requirement, but the lack of Chemistry is going to be a problem.
Not necessarily true.

biochemistry degrees can be very broad, with universities varying greatly in the content of their degrees

some biochemistry degrees can be heavily biology-based, others could be weigh in heavily on the chemistry aspects. It depends
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(Original post by faith 101)
Not necessarily true.

biochemistry degrees can be very broad, with universities varying greatly in the content of their degrees

some biochemistry degrees can be heavily biology-based, others could be weigh in heavily on the chemistry aspects. It depends
No, not really. The clue for the need of 'chemistry' is in the title of the degree, 'biochemistry'. It would not be possible to successfully complete a biochemistry course without a basic grounding in post GCSE chemistry. In fact, out of Biology and Chemistry, the more dispensable of the two would actually be Biology.
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(Original post by Reality Check)
No, not really. The clue for the need of 'chemistry' is in the title of the degree, 'biochemistry'. It would not be possible to successfully complete a biochemistry course without a basic grounding in post GCSE chemistry. In fact, out of Biology and Chemistry, the more dispensable of the two would actually be Biology.
I cannot speak for all biochemistry degree programmes, but yes, i do generally agree that you do need some background of post-gcse chemistry

Again, it really depends on the course. Some biochemistry degree courses allow you to heavily tailor your degree, allowing students to choose biology-heavy modules, sharing classes and lectures with students from straight biology/ genetics etc. degree programmes. For such courses, biology would be more dispensable

do you have a biochemistry degree? Are you basing your opinions simply on the name of the degree?

there is a lot of misinformation on this site
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(Original post by faith 101)
do you have a biochemistry degree? Are you basing your opinions simply on the name of the degree?
I have a degree in Natural Sciences from Cambridge which included biochemistry. How about you?

there is a lot of misinformation on this site
Indeed - so try not to add to it!
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I have a degree in Natural Sciences from Cambridge which included biochemistry. How about you?



Indeed - so try not to add to it!
You win
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username2858058
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alleycat393

Can you please tell this reality check dude off for posting nonsense, and can you put him in his place

Thanks
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alleycat393
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(Original post by faith 101)
alleycat393

Can you please tell this reality check dude off for posting nonsense, and can you put him in his place

Thanks
He’s right. I have a degree in biochemistry and heavily skewed it towards biology but chemistry was a requirement when I applied. Biology wasn’t. Maths wasn’t either but it helped. People without maths received extra classes.
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(Original post by alleycat393)
He’s right. I have a degree in biochemistry and heavily skewed it towards biology but chemistry was a requirement when I applied. Biology wasn’t. Maths wasn’t either but it helped. People without maths received extra classes.
Umm im right or he’s right?!

have you read the thread’s discourse?

your say he’s right but then say you heavily tailored your degree towards the biology side... which is exactly what i said. Chemistry can be a requirement when making course applications, but it may not be so heavily relevant during the actual degree!
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(Original post by faith 101)
Umm im right or he’s right?!

have you read the thread’s discourse?

your say he’s right but then say you heavily tailored your degree towards the biology side... which is exactly what i said. Chemistry can be a requirement when making course applications, but it may not be so heavily relevant during the actual degree!
I really don't understand what you're struggling with here. You seem to have got hung up with these posts:


(Original post by Mikolaj1109)
would it be possible to successfully complete a biochemistry degree without having studied Biology at A level, but having studied maths, fm, physics and german, as a lot of universities don't state it as a requirement?
(Original post by Reality Check)
Chemistry and maths are far more important for success at biochemistry than Biology. You've got the maths requirement, but the lack of Chemistry is going to be a problem.
The facts of the matter, as I stated, were that for entry to study Biochemistry, Chemistry is more important than Biology. This is a fact.

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You then seem to have got obsessed with the degree and its content, rather than what is required to study it in the first place, which is not what the OP asked. Reading more carefully will help you.
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Nihilisticb*tch
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Since you have neither biology or chemistry for a degree called biochemistry then I don't think so. Some universities may accept you but I think you would find it very difficult. If you want to do biochemistry I would suggest taking a chemistry A level privately. Biology isn't apparently that important but you should definitely get chemistry
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username2858058
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[quote(Original post by Reality Check)]I really don't understand what you're struggling with here. You seem to have got hung up with these posts:





The facts of the matter, as I stated, were that for entry to study Biochemistry, Chemistry is more important than Biology. This is a fact.

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You then seem to have got obsessed with the degree and its content, rather than what is required to study it in the first place, which is not what the OP asked. Reading more carefully will help you.[/quote]

No, stop trying to twist things

op said success in a biochemistry degree and so did you

And that success doesnt have to depend on chemistry more than biology

It depends on the degree course and the modules the student takes. More often than not, biology would aid you a lot more
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alleycat393
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(Original post by faith 101)
Umm im right or he’s right?!

have you read the thread’s discourse?

your say he’s right but then say you heavily tailored your degree towards the biology side... which is exactly what i said. Chemistry can be a requirement when making course applications, but it may not be so heavily relevant during the actual degree!
Hun you need to read through the discussion and understand what the OP is asking without getting worked up. Tailoring your degree happens once you’ve started. The OP is asking about entry requirements. So unfortunately yes reality check is right and you need to check what the OP is asking. Good luck!
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czardasz
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(Original post by Nihilisticb*tch)
Since you have neither biology or chemistry for a degree called biochemistry then I don't think so. Some universities may accept you but I think you would find it very difficult. If you want to do biochemistry I would suggest taking a chemistry A level privately. Biology isn't apparently that important but you should definitely get chemistry
As I said before I am studying A level chemistry, I just missed it out by accident in my original post
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username2858058
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No, i will never give up. I will fight for what is right

And i will fight for the truth

nd i will fight for justice
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