Can you Rate these GCSEs??? Watch

_Mia101
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So, I wanted to know the difference of work load (content needed to be learnt) between History and Geography.

Where a 10 being a lot; and 1 being a little.

Also, if any one knows how many case studies there are in Geography that'd be helpful.

Thanks
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nikola14
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I'd probably say that the workload is heavier in history. More essay writing and key dates etc
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_Mia101
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(Original post by nikola14)
I'd probably say that the workload is heavier in history. More essay writing and key dates etc
Okay, so there is more to learn. Thank you. But in geography do you need to know a lot of the case studies?
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nikola14
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(Original post by _Mia101)
Okay, so there is more to learn. Thank you. But in geography do you need to know a lot of the case studies?
I chose history for my GCSEs so can't say for certain, but my friends haven't mentioned any parts of the course that have been super challenging. I think they learn about the case studies in class mostly so don't seem to have much more to learn outside of lessons.
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_Mia101
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(Original post by nikola14)
I chose history for my GCSEs so can't say for certain, but my friends haven't mentioned any parts of the course that have been super challenging. I think they learn about the case studies in class mostly so don't seem to have much more to learn outside of lessons.
Oh okay. Would you say history would be a realistic subject choice for someone who is doing triple science, math, further maths, english, french, RS and ICT?

Sorry for so many questions but I'm thinking of switching.
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BahozM
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1h
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_Mia101
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what do you mean by 1h?

(Original post by BahozM)
1h
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nikola14
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(Original post by _Mia101)
Oh okay. Would you say history would be a realistic subject choice for someone who is doing triple science, math, further maths, english, french, RS and ICT?

Sorry for so many questions but I'm thinking of switching.
I'm doing english lit, english lan, RE, maths, triple science, computer science, french, history and possibly Polish.
You'll definitely be okay with it
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Gent2324
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it all depends on the person, if you like essays and dates etc do history, if you prefer whatever geography consists of then do that.

theres no such thing as an "easy" a level - if the questions are easy, the grade boundaries are incredibly high, thus making it not easy anymore, if the questions are hard, the grade boundaries are low. the exam boards dont make mistakes by making certain courses easier than others, its all based on the individual, so getting other people to rate it wont get you anywhere
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atternal
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(Original post by _Mia101)
So, I wanted to know the difference of work load (content needed to be learnt) between History and Geography.

Where a 10 being a lot; and 1 being a little.

Also, if any one knows how many case studies there are in Geography that'd be helpful.

Thanks
I took both this year and tbh content wise for both is roughly the same however the content that you have to revise that has to go into the exam is WAY more in geography. In history you can get away with in the exam with being a bit less specific because there is so much history to remember and you can get away with waffleing in the exam and being more general ( unless you want a 9 or just want to show off- but even so to get a 9 you dont have to load it with facts, jsut put a few here and there) But in geography you have to be very specific particularly in the case studies so in that way you need to know a lot in geo. I have no idea if this is helpful aha. also if i remember off the top of my head there is about 20 case studies I think. trust me when I say this learn the facts for geo now because I learnt all the case stidies on the day of the exam and it was pretty stressful. Good luck in both!! x

bacically what im trying to say is its slighlty easier in history if youre good at writing essays
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_Mia101
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(Original post by atternal)
I took both this year and tbh content wise for both is roughly the same however the content that you have to revise that has to go into the exam is WAY more in geography. In history you can get away with in the exam with being a bit less specific because there is so much history to remember and you can get away with waffleing in the exam and being more general ( unless you want a 9 or just want to show off- but even so to get a 9 you dont have to load it with facts, jsut put a few here and there) But in geography you have to be very specific particularly in the case studies so in that way you need to know a lot in geo. I have no idea if this is helpful aha. also if i remember off the top of my head there is about 20 case studies I think. trust me when I say this learn the facts for geo now because I learnt all the case stidies on the day of the exam and it was pretty stressful. Good luck in both!! x

bacically what im trying to say is its slighlty easier in history if youre good at writing essays
Thank you! I think that is where there is an issue for me: essay writing. I am good at learning and UNDERSTANDING information however, when it comes to writing it out I tend to do badly with the structure.

And it's weird because in English my essays are really good; maybe it's the analysis I guess.

It's why I want to know the workload to see if it is worth switching in the hopes of a better grade in a subject which I think I might enjoy more, versus sticking with history where I may get bored as I don't think I will like the topics and will end up not revising, not understanding the exam technique etc. As a result a) failing it and getting good grades in the rest, or b) spending so much time on it at the expense of my other grades.

Another I wanted to know (which you answered) is how much of what you study do you need to know. In history would I have to know all the facts (I aiming for a 9) and then end up only needed a few? And in geography is it the same? Or would you need to actually use all the info?

Also (sorry for all the questions) would you need to simply regurgitate the information in history or geography or both? ike, how do the exams differ?

Assuming someone has all the knowledge of both, which exam would they find easier?

Thank you so much
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_Mia101
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(Original post by Gent2324)
it all depends on the person, if you like essays and dates etc do history, if you prefer whatever geography consists of then do that.

theres no such thing as an "easy" a level - if the questions are easy, the grade boundaries are incredibly high, thus making it not easy anymore, if the questions are hard, the grade boundaries are low. the exam boards dont make mistakes by making certain courses easier than others, its all based on the individual, so getting other people to rate it wont get you anywhere
I'm doing GCSEs, and I wasn't asking how easy they are. I was asking how much content there is. For example when you compare math to RS or something, there is significantly more to remember/"cram" in RS than maths.

That was what I was asking.

Thanks anyways.
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_Mia101
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(Original post by nikola14)
I'm doing english lit, english lan, RE, maths, triple science, computer science, french, history and possibly Polish.
You'll definitely be okay with it
Okay! Good luck on your GCSEs. I think though, I may end up doing geo as I think it suits me better: I will most likely struggle with history because the modules don't particularly

Thank you anyways.
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atternal
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(Original post by _Mia101)
Thank you! I think that is where there is an issue for me: essay writing. I am good at learning and UNDERSTANDING information however, when it comes to writing it out I tend to do badly with the structure.

And it's weird because in English my essays are really good; maybe it's the analysis I guess.

It's why I want to know the workload to see if it is worth switching in the hopes of a better grade in a subject which I think I might enjoy more, versus sticking with history where I may get bored as I don't think I will like the topics and will end up not revising, not understanding the exam technique etc. As a result a) failing it and getting good grades in the rest, or b) spending so much time on it at the expense of my other grades.

Another I wanted to know (which you answered) is how much of what you study do you need to know. In history would I have to know all the facts (I aiming for a 9) and then end up only needed a few? And in geography is it the same? Or would you need to actually use all the info?

Also (sorry for all the questions) would you need to simply regurgitate the information in history or geography or both? ike, how do the exams differ?

Assuming someone has all the knowledge of both, which exam would they find easier?

Thank you so much
youre welcome!!

In history its more to do with the way you analyse and interpret the facts that you are using and how it is relevant to the question - particularly when analysing quotes or comparing quotes. For the longer answer questions you would have to know facts but if here and there you dont give an exact date then its okay or if you forget a name you wont be marked down for it if your explanation is good. You probably wont use all the information you know but its best if you try and focus on knowing generally with a couple of facts about everything, and then for the things that are likely to come up know soem more facts about them. Also last year (when I did my exam) we knew that Durham Cathederal was going to come up in a 16 mark question so I made sure to include loaaads of facts in that. And the history exam is really short timewise for the amount you have to write so you really have to rush so in that way you cant write everything you want/could write bevause you would run out of time.

For geography, you have to know the facts because otherwise you probably wont be able to answer the question, you have to know specific numbers ie how many people died folling the 2011 Japan Tsunami. But then again not all the case studies come up so you wont have to use all the information. In history you can kind of make up what your talking about as long as it sounds believeable as the person marking your paper probably wont know much about history as the people that mark the papers may not be historians/ history teavhers.

The grade boundaries for geography are usually low so if you work hard then its easier to do better ( also paper three is pretty much common sense and you dont have to know much about geography to do it. ) I revised geography for all the papers on the morning of the exam and didnt do much before that and I only memorised data and I got a 7 which was REALLY suprising . so yeah the geography is probably easier, or at least it was for me. i still have all my case study atuff somewhere so if you’d like me to send you pictures of them then just let me know.

Good luck in whichever you choose and if you need help then im here x
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_Mia101
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(Original post by atternal)
youre welcome!!

In history its more to do with the way you analyse and interpret the facts that you are using and how it is relevant to the question - particularly when analysing quotes or comparing quotes. For the longer answer questions you would have to know facts but if here and there you dont give an exact date then its okay or if you forget a name you wont be marked down for it if your explanation is good. You probably wont use all the information you know but its best if you try and focus on knowing generally with a couple of facts about everything, and then for the things that are likely to come up know soem more facts about them. Also last year (when I did my exam) we knew that Durham Cathederal was going to come up in a 16 mark question so I made sure to include loaaads of facts in that. And the history exam is really short timewise for the amount you have to write so you really have to rush so in that way you cant write everything you want/could write bevause you would run out of time.

For geography, you have to know the facts because otherwise you probably wont be able to answer the question, you have to know specific numbers ie how many people died folling the 2011 Japan Tsunami. But then again not all the case studies come up so you wont have to use all the information. In history you can kind of make up what your talking about as long as it sounds believeable as the person marking your paper probably wont know much about history as the people that mark the papers may not be historians/ history teavhers.

The grade boundaries for geography are usually low so if you work hard then its easier to do better ( also paper three is pretty much common sense and you dont have to know much about geography to do it. ) I revised geography for all the papers on the morning of the exam and didnt do much before that and I only memorised data and I got a 7 which was REALLY suprising . so yeah the geography is probably easier, or at least it was for me. i still have all my case study atuff somewhere so if you’d like me to send you pictures of them then just let me know.

Good luck in whichever you choose and if you need help then im here x
Thank you so much! Yes If you still have your case studies and can find them that would be amazing. As I think I am leaning more towards geography. I will have one last history class to make sure that I am sure and then decide whether I am switching or not.

Also, would you say naturally you are better at geography than history? And, do you need to know a lot about contour lines and maps? And do you need to know about the biomes: tundra and the other four?

Thanks again!
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_Mia101
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(Original post by atternal)
youre welcome!!

In history its more to do with the way you analyse and interpret the facts that you are using and how it is relevant to the question - particularly when analysing quotes or comparing quotes. For the longer answer questions you would have to know facts but if here and there you dont give an exact date then its okay or if you forget a name you wont be marked down for it if your explanation is good. You probably wont use all the information you know but its best if you try and focus on knowing generally with a couple of facts about everything, and then for the things that are likely to come up know soem more facts about them. Also last year (when I did my exam) we knew that Durham Cathederal was going to come up in a 16 mark question so I made sure to include loaaads of facts in that. And the history exam is really short timewise for the amount you have to write so you really have to rush so in that way you cant write everything you want/could write bevause you would run out of time.

For geography, you have to know the facts because otherwise you probably wont be able to answer the question, you have to know specific numbers ie how many people died folling the 2011 Japan Tsunami. But then again not all the case studies come up so you wont have to use all the information. In history you can kind of make up what your talking about as long as it sounds believeable as the person marking your paper probably wont know much about history as the people that mark the papers may not be historians/ history teavhers.

The grade boundaries for geography are usually low so if you work hard then its easier to do better ( also paper three is pretty much common sense and you dont have to know much about geography to do it. ) I revised geography for all the papers on the morning of the exam and didnt do much before that and I only memorised data and I got a 7 which was REALLY suprising . so yeah the geography is probably easier, or at least it was for me. i still have all my case study atuff somewhere so if you’d like me to send you pictures of them then just let me know.

Good luck in whichever you choose and if you need help then im here x
One last thing (sorry), do you need to know the causes, factors and effects of every event in history? As I know a question that comes up in the IGCSE paper is describe two factors of X.

And in geography, do you need to know the short-term and long-term reliefs of all disasters and how hard is it to learn them. Like, the causes of the events etc. Also, I've been told that the topic about tectonic plates (constructive, destructive) is rather difficult, would you say that it is true?

Sorry and Thanks again!
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Fl3ra
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100% I think geography is better, everyone at my school who chose both geography and history (including me) say that geography is better. Its easier to understand, makes sense and can be applied a lot in other subjects and the real world.
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_Mia101
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(Original post by Fl3ra)
100% I think geography is better, everyone at my school who chose both geography and history (including me) say that geography is better. Its easier to understand, makes sense and can be applied a lot in other subjects and the real world.
Okay thank you!
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