Mick Beever
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Is there any way in the UK for me to undertake doing Biology and psychology? I know the workload would be ridiculous, doing two degrees at once, but I'm passionate for both and could (probably) manage it.
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ChemistryGuy1998
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You won't be doing 2 degrees but you'll take a mix of modules from both disciplines, google Biology and Psychology degrees UK, here's an example from Newcastle:

https://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/...courseoverview
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Mick Beever)
Is there any way in the UK for me to undertake doing Biology and psychology? I know the workload would be ridiculous, doing two degrees at once, but I'm passionate for both and could (probably) manage it.
No, there are joint degrees but no double degrees, outside very rare dual jurisdiction law degrees which are usually years (I think only UCL left?)
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artful_lounger
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Joint honours courses are not double degrees - the latter are very uncommon in the UK, and normally only exist as joint programmes between two separate universities, one of which is internationally based. The closest to that would be intercalated degrees for medicine students, the 1 year CS "intercalation" offered by Birmingham Physics, or starting on one course and switching to another degree programme (which may or may not be possible and if you are having to start from year 1 of the second degree, might have adverse financial ramifications). The only true double degree programmes are usually in partnership with international universiies, and at the undergraduate level these are largely (possibly entirely) within Law as above (and usually these can't be applied to directly, and you apply to the main law course or some variation of it and then pending excellent results while at the university, apply internally to that dual degree programme).

Joint honours courses, however, are fairly common and certainly very standard. You usually study two subjects in some proportion between 75-25 and 50-50 ratios of each (typically the former styled as "X with Y" and the latter as "X and Y". As far as Psychology and Biology go, they are closely related subjects anyway and have some alternate routes which may appeal. There are also "Natural Sciences" degrees (and a few similar courses, such as Arts and Sciences at UCL, Liberal Arts at many, or Combined Social Sciences at Durham, in other areas) which allow you to pursue several different areas of science together, and then specialise in one or two of those. Many of these have Psychology as an option (notably at Cambridge, until just a few years ago this was the only route to studying Psychology there, other than intercalating medics and Philosophy students taking an optional paper in second year).

For a strongly biological and scientific course focusing on the mind and brain, the usual subject to look into would be Neuroscience. This is more or less the intersection of Biology and Psychology anyway, and rather than just studying a bunch of topics from each area and then making the links between them yourself, the entire course will inherently specialize into the links between those areas above and beyond what a typical joint honours course might do. Some related courses like Cognitive Science or Human Sciences might also be appropriate, although these might skew more in one direction or the other, or slightly in a different direction entirely.

However beyond that, many Psychology courses in the UK have a strong experimental/scientific approach focusing on biological methods and theory - this is especially true at many of the strongest universities (such as Oxbridge, Bath, and UCL). At the very least, any BPS accredited Psychology degree will include a minimum amount of Biological Psychology content. However if you look for courses which normally expect students to have done some science A-level(s) in their entry criteria, or prefer/suggest that background is helpful, they are often more scientifically inclined. Equally, it's quite possible many other more general bioscience degrees (such as in Biomedical Sciences/Physiology/Anatomy/Biological Sciences) might have options you can take in neuroscience, brain and cognitive sciences, or psychology itself, either as part of the usual programme or as an outside optional module (it might also be possible the other way around in a Psychology course, however there may be more prerequisites that limit your options that way, potentially).

Purely regarding joint honours courses, there are a number of options - if you search "Biology and Psychology" in UCAS you will probably get back umpteen results to peruse. I would suggest closely investigating the actual structure and content of these courses, as what one course will offer may well differ greatly from another. You may also want to check if they are BPS accredited and consider if this is something important for you - some graduate positions moving on from Psychology may expect or require a BPS accredited course, although this is quite likely just a few specific areas. Those might be what you want to pursue though, so it's worth checking. These same questions apply to Natural Sciences courses as well.

I would suggest, in short (or not...), looking to see if something interdisciplinary like Neuroscience or similar may be appealing, and whether you wish to focus on that; or else, investigating joint honours and natural sciences/similar type courses and seeing what is available there. You could also consider, if your interest in one is subsidiary to the other, whether you could pursue a degree in just the one subject but still take modules in the other as options (which is often possible). There are a wealth of possibilities available though, but none of them will award you two degrees (some may be integrated undergraduate masters degrees - MSci or similar for example - but these aren't two separate degrees being awarded, it's one extended course where you get a single degree at the end. Except at Cambridge, because of course...)
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