How to get full marks on a enlgish power and conflict poetry comparison question

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username3563638
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#1
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#1
Thanks.
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AngelStarfire
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Same - I don’t know (>-< )
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Tolgash
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This is pretty much a copy and paste rip-off from a comment I've made on another thread, but it still holds true, and is for the same purpose, here as well.



Any question you receive regarding poetry in the exam will be based on comparison (for Edexcel students); with this in mind, I would recommend starting with an introduction, no longer than one or two sentences, stating that you will be comparing the poem in the question with your chosen poem on a particular theme (which will be in the question). You are provided with the anthology’s poem and poet names in the exam.


You should follow this introduction up with three paragraphs: one comparing how the poets use form to present the question's theme; one comparing how the poets use language to present the question's theme; one comparing how the poets use structure to present the question's theme. You should aim to use two examples in each paragraph. I also strongly recommend using at least three quotes from your chosen poem. You should aim to embed many quotes as evidence for your interpretations on the question's poem, especially since the text will be right in front of you. These three paragraphs can be written in any order, I personally went with form first, language second and structure third.


Finally, finish off with a conclusion condensing what you have just written in the main body of your answer.


I believe this is a winning formula. It served me well, and full marks in poetry for the real exam is a testament to its success.
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username3563638
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safe.
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Vinny C
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Er… on AN English. Is this your first language?
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username3563638
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#6
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(Original post by Vinny C)
Er… on AN English. Is this your first language?
Ha! Typo sorry, and English is my first language
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Vinny C
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(Original post by TheFlash2024)
Ha! Typo sorry, and English is my first language
Np... unlike the continent, we are not taught grammatically. Can you define the subjunctive tense, for example?
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Vinny C
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Can anyone here provide an example of the subjunctive... the conditional subjunctive, the dative? Not one English speaker knows English grammar, it is not how we are taught.
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Tolgash
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(Original post by Vinny C)
Can anyone here provide an example of the subjunctive... the conditional subjunctive, the dative? Not one English speaker knows English grammar, it is not how we are taught.
That's an interesting point actually. I'm slightly ashamed about my ignorance of these grammatical terms that you've stated. They sound like something derived from my GCSE French textbook. I'm surprised I haven't suffered any major consequences as of yet with such inadequate knowledge aha.
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Vinny C
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
That's an interesting point actually. I'm slightly ashamed about my ignorance of these grammatical terms that you've stated. They sound like something derived from my GCSE French textbook. I'm surprised I haven't suffered any major consequences as of yet with such inadequate knowledge aha.
As I said... we are not taught English grammatically and most continentals are amazed when they hear this. Then how do you know what is right? Decades of correction and mockery if you get it wrong, lol. Examples of these various tenses are I am, I might be , I could have been, be quiet! lol. We just use them without knowing what they are called.
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username3835030
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doing love and relationships gr8
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Tolgash
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(Original post by Vinny C)
As I said... we are not taught English grammatically and most continentals are amazed when they hear this. Then how do you know what is right? Decades of correction and mockery if you get it wrong, lol. Examples of these various tenses are I am, I might be , I could have been, be quiet! lol. We just use them without knowing what they are called.
While that's true, things might change. I hear the new curriculum for the SATs teaches students English grammar explicitly, and so they'll probably have a very confident grasp of this. Also, I believe my A-level course in English language will cover these aspects of grammar as well.
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Vinny C
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
While that's true, things might change. I hear the new curriculum for the SATs teaches students English grammar explicitly, and so they'll probably have a very confident grasp of this. Also, I believe my A-level course in English language will cover these aspects of grammar as well.
English is so irregular (over 300 irregular verbs) most continentals believe we only speak one language because it takes a lifetime to learn it well, lol. The line "Sought to learn to woo the fate of man" gets them every time. Wtf... is that olde English? No... just a lovely example of an irregular verb in an unusual tense. Passive subjunctive?
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