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    In the presence of oxygen, respiration yields more ATP per molecule of glucose than it does in the absence of oxygen. Explain why.

    I looked at the mark scheme and don’t understand , help needed
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    (Original post by hopefulDocc)
    In the presence of oxygen, respiration yields more ATP per molecule of glucose than it does in the absence of oxygen. Explain why.

    I looked at the mark scheme and don’t understand , help needed
    What level is this - A level or undergrad? The answer lies in the difference between aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis, but I can't help you properly until I know what level you're working at.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    What level is this - A level or undergrad? The answer lies in the difference between aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis, but I can't help you properly until I know what level you're working at.
    Sorry , A level Biology
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    (Original post by hopefulDocc)
    Sorry , A level Biology
    OK - have you done both aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis?
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    Look at glycolysis and anerovix resperiation and see their products and intermediate and you'll find your answer. I think with oxygen it can do Krebs cycle and links reaction and the oxidative phosorlasion but without it can't do Krebs cycle or links I THINK
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    OK - have you done both aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis?
    I have done aerobic glycolysis but not anaerobic ( totally forgot about that)
    ik that in anaerobic turns the pyruvates into ethanol and lactate so no ATP formed and thus less yield ? That’s my guess
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    (Original post by hopefulDocc)
    I have done aerobic glycolysis but not anaerobic ( totally forgot about that)
    ik that in anaerobic turns the pyruvates into ethanol and lactate so no ATP formed and thus less yield ? That’s my guess
    Yep, you're spot on - you answered that without any help really.

    So, in the presence of oxygen, the product of glycolysis, pyruvate, can be fed into the TCA and via oxidation pass its high energy electrons onto the electron transport chain and generate ATP via oxidative phosphorylation. As you've noted, in the absence of oxygen, glycolysis stops at pyruvate, and this is reduced to either ethanol via acetaldehyde or lactate (which is oxidised back to pyruvate in certain cells, or is used to generate glucose via gluconeogenesis). So the only ATP production in the absence of oxygen, via anaerobic glycolysis, is that which occurs during the oxidation of glucose to pyruvate during glycolysis.

    Look up how many molecules of ATP are formed via anaerobic glycolysis compared to aerobic. It's a huge difference.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    Yep, you're spot on - you answered that without any help really.

    So, in the presence of oxygen, the product of glycolysis, pyruvate, can be fed into the TCA and via oxidation pass its high energy electrons onto the electron transport chain and generate ATP via oxidative phosphorylation. As you've noted, in the absence of oxygen, glycolysis stops at pyruvate, and this is oxidised to either ethanol via acetaldehyde or lactate (which is oxidised back to pyruvate in certain cells, or is used to generate glucose via gluconeogenesis). So the only ATP production in the absence of oxygen, via anaerobic glycolysis, is that which occurs during the oxidation of glucose to pyruvate during glycolysis.

    Look up how many molecules of ATP are formed via anaerobic glycolysis compared to aerobic. It's a huge difference.
    You are brilliant ! Thank you so much for taking the time to help.
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    (Original post by hopefulDocc)
    You are brilliant ! Thank you so much for taking the time to help.
    haha - thanks! You're welcome
 
 
 
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