username4236092
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Resolved now. Thank you
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alleycat393
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(Original post by Fizzyfuz)
I started my degree with Open university. As you know no rules to start studying with them. English is my second language although main language and I am British, so struggled at level 1 badly but got better and better at it every year with my English improved over time. I studied while looking after my 5 children and working full time. On my last year finishing BSc open (honours) with 2:2. I studied mostly biology but took a math, social care and environmental module too. I desperately want to master genetics now but York university wants 2:1 minimum. Will I have enough knowledge to take masters degree? Do I have any chance to be accepted with my 2:2? Am I better off starting from BSc but I am 43 years old although look younger and well fit? Why life is so complicated?
If they want a 2.1 they won't budge on it unfortunately irrespective of whether you think you have sufficient knowledge. People start studying at various different stages of their lives so don't worry about your age. You certainly don't need to look a certain way to study!
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Sentenced_to
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You have very good chances to be accepted! Since you are a mature student, Iike I am, they will look into other, non academic, qualifications as well that often waive the classification formaly required. Moreover, you can ask them to fist enrol to the Posgraduate Diploma programme. If you do well at this stage you can then transfer to the full masters (but don't take my word for it - ask them to be sure).

Good luck!
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alleycat393
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(Original post by Sentenced_to)
You have very good chances to be accepted! Since you are a mature student, Iike I am, they will look into other, non academic, qualifications as well that often waive the classification formaly required. Moreover, you can ask them to fist enrol to the Posgraduate Diploma programme. If you do well at this stage you can then transfer to the full masters (but don't take my word for it - ask them to be sure).

Good luck!
Sorry your confidence is based on what? Have you had a similar experience?
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Duncan2012
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(Original post by Fizzyfuz)
I started my degree with Open university. As you know no rules to start studying with them. English is my second language although main language and I am British, so struggled at level 1 badly but got better and better at it every year with my English improved over time. I studied while looking after my 5 children and working full time. On my last year finishing BSc open (honours) with 2:2. I studied mostly biology but took a math, social care and environmental module too. I desperately want to master genetics now but York university wants 2:1 minimum. Will I have enough knowledge to take masters degree? Do I have any chance to be accepted with my 2:2? Am I better off starting from BSc but I am 43 years old although look younger and well fit? Why life is so complicated?
What did York University say when you asked them this question?

Which course are you looking at - York doesn't have a taught MSc in genetics.
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Sentenced_to
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(Original post by alleycat393)
Sorry your confidence is based on what? Have you had a similar experience?
I think that I explained my reasoning relatively well.

My experience is that I was accepted for a Master's at a top 35 Uni, requiring a 2:1 or more, with a 3rd. And that was my one and only application too. The fact that I had an extra postgraduate qualification might have helped of course (which is from a top 20 uni - again accepted with a 3rd, obviously), but being mature and having some life and work experience helps too, for sure!

Also, every application is unique. So, considering the OP's case, an open university degree while raising children and/or looking after family really shows some determination and strong will, even it may not have come with the required classification (that is only marginally worse). In any case, it wouldn't hurt at all to give it a shot.

In general, the student room is very orthodox at times, and that is good on the one hand, because students should always aim for the best in order to not end up with a crappy ordinary, 3rd, or 2:2 like with my case, as it will often make the beginning of their professional life easier. However, real life examples are often different. A grade shouldn't and doesn't follow you for the rest of your life. After your first couple of jobs few will care about it.
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alleycat393
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(Original post by Sentenced_to)
I think that I explained my reasoning relatively well.

My experience is that I was accepted for a Master's at a top 35 Uni, requiring a 2:1 or more, with a 3rd. And that was my one and only application too. The fact that I had an extra postgraduate qualification might have helped of course (which is from a top 20 uni - again accepted with a 3rd, obviously), but being mature and having some life and work experience helps too, for sure!

Also, every application is unique. So, considering the OP's case, an open university degree while raising children and/or looking after family really shows some determination and strong will, even it may not have come with the required classification (that is only marginally worse). In any case, it wouldn't hurt at all to give it a shot.

In general, the student room is very orthodox at times, and that is good on the one hand, because students should always aim for the best in order to not end up with a crappy ordinary, 3rd, or 2:2 like with my case, as it will often make the beginning of their professional life easier. However, real life examples are often different. A grade shouldn't and doesn't follow you for the rest of your life. After your first couple of jobs few will care about it.
While that’s all great if a uni has said that they want a certain grade and the OP is just going in the fact that they think they will manage then they will struggle. Yes circumstances come in to play but unfortunately as has been the case here and as I suspected in some cases they simply aren’t enough. Being able to raise kids doesn’t mean you’ll be able to cope with a masters in a science subject. I wouldn’t say I’m orthodox by any stretch of imagination but I do know how unis work given that I work for one and this is my field.

You too told the OP to check (which it sounded like they did before posting) and you had a postgrad qualification already which is an academic qualification but the OP doesn’t seem to. If they had relevant work experience that would be a different story.
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chaotic1328
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One of my cohort (she was par-time, hence finished a year later than me) just graduated with a Distinction in her MA, after gaining admission onto the course with a Third.

On that basis:

1/ It is entirely possible to get on to a masters programme in a RG uni with a 2:2.
2/ You can still do very well on the masters even though your undergrad grade was somewhat below par.

Go for it and good luck!
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Duncan2012
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(Original post by Fizzyfuz)
On my last year finishing BSc open (honours) with 2:2.
(Original post by Fizzyfuz)
Oh I am starting from scratch now with BSc genetics. I left open university without taking any qualifications.
This doesn't make sense. Do you have a degree or don't you?
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Reality Check
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Reading this thread you'd think that getting onto a Masters with a 2ii or less is as easy as falling off a log.

A Masters rarely makes up for a poor undegraduate degree anyway. If there's adverse circumstances which lead to a poor undergrad result, then those circumstances would be taken into account when applying for further study - the 2ii is essentially not representative of the true abilities of the student. If there are no such reason, and someone just did badly at their first degree, then that would indicate a lack of ability or unwillingness to do what it takes, and one would then need to question why they'd apply for a further (harder) degree in the first place.
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Duncan2012
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(Original post by Fizzyfuz)
Do I have a degree lol?
So, you don't have a degree. And the whole premise of this thread is nonsense.
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Sentenced_to
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Reading this thread you'd think that getting onto a Masters with a 2ii or less is as easy as falling off a log.
Well, basically it is because roughly half of the UK universities (the lower ranked obviously) only ask for a 2:2.
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