Is a pronoun the same as a personal pronoun ???

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anonomon
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If not whats the difference ...???
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Reality Check
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(Original post by anonomon)
If not whats the difference ...???
A pronoun is just any word that stands in place of a noun.

Personal pronouns are nouns that stand in place of nouns for people - I/me; you/you/ he/him;she/her/it/it us/we, you/you, they/them. There are also personal pronouns in the genitive case (the case of possession) - mine, yours, him/hers/its, ours, yours and theirs.

Personal pronouns are one of the few parts of speech in English which have a marked case - eg the difference between 'I' and 'me' as well as number and person.
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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(Original post by Reality Check)
A pronoun is just any word that stands in place of a noun.

Personal pronouns are nouns that stand in place of nouns for people - I/me; you/you/ he/him;she/her/it/it us/we, you/you, they/them. There are also personal pronouns in the genitive case (the case of possession) - mine, yours, him/hers/its, ours, yours and theirs.

Personal pronouns are one of the few parts of speech in English which have a marked case - eg the difference between 'I' and 'me' as well as number and person.
Sorry to butt in, but in this case, could you give an example of a pronoun that isn't a personal pronoun?
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
Sorry to butt in, but in this case, could you give an example of a pronoun that isn't a personal pronoun?
For example, a notice in a café:

"Everybody who takes a cake must return his plate to the counter"

In this case, 'everybody' is a pronoun standing in place of unspecified persons. It is a indefinite pronoun. Note the concordance with the verb: indefinite pronouns are singular and take singular objects (in this case 'everybody' and 'his'.) This can cause problems with seemingly wrong concordance where the singular indefinite pronoun is near a 'plural' object and then triggers an (incorrect) plural possessive.
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There are also interrogative, reflexive, reciprocal, relative, demonstrative...
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username4169146
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
Sorry to butt in, but in this case, could you give an example of a pronoun that isn't a personal pronoun?
Such, this, that, these, those, none, neither ?
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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(Original post by Reality Check)
For example, a notice in a café:

"Everybody who takes a cake must return his plate to the counter"

In this case, 'everybody' is a pronoun standing in place of unspecified persons. It is a indefinite pronoun. Note the concordance with the verb: indefinite pronouns are singular and take singular objects (in this case 'everybody' and 'his'.)
(Original post by Reality Check)
There are also interrogative, reflexive, reciprocal, relative, demonstrative...
Thanks! Believe it or not, I work as a professional writer, so obviously use these words every day.. but have little need to know what they're called. It's interesting, though. English language tuition didn't go this deep when I studied it (or if it did I wasn't listening, anyway).
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
Thanks! Believe it or not, I work as a professional writer, so obviously use these words every day.. but have little need to know what they're called. It's interesting, though. English language tuition didn't go this deep when I studied it (or if it did I wasn't listening, anyway).
You're welcome You're not dissimilar to 99.9% of everyone else - I think it's only if you've done a course to teach ESOL that you come across it. If you're a native speaker, you just sort of 'know it', don't you? It's the same with tag questions and phrasal verbs - things which we don't give a second thought about but which non-native speakers reallystruggle with
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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(Original post by Reality Check)
You're welcome You're not dissimilar to 99.9% of everyone else - I think it's only if you've done a course to teach ESOL that you come across it. If you're a native speaker, you just sort of 'know it', don't you? It's the same with tag questions and phrasal verbs - things which we don't give a second thought about but which non-native speakers really struggle with
Yeah exactly - I always feel like a bit of a fraud considering my lack of knowledge in relation to my job, but hey, plenty of time to learn thanks again.
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anonomon
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
Yeah exactly - I always feel like a bit of a fraud considering my lack of knowledge in relation to my job, but hey, plenty of time to learn thanks again.
If you don't mind me asking what is your job? (I'm currently looking for career inspiration).
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Vinny C
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(Original post by snugglebear)
Such, this, that, these, those, none, neither ?
it?
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(Original post by anonomon)
If you don't mind me asking what is your job? (I'm currently looking for career inspiration).
Freelance writer/editor/proofreader. I can link to my professional profile if you're really interested in learning more, PM me if you want it!
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username4094562
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
Thanks! Believe it or not, I work as a professional writer, so obviously use these words every day.. but have little need to know what they're called. It's interesting, though. English language tuition didn't go this deep when I studied it (or if it did I wasn't listening, anyway).
It depends on what type of English Language tuition it was. The only two groups of people who would need to know all these grammatical terms are those on ESOL classes and people studying a linguistics degree. Of course, entry level ESOL classes would only cover the basics.
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