Most employable programming language to learn?

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kate-Bush
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#1
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I'm going to learn a programming language so I can have something extra to boost my CV. Was wondering what the most useful one would be to learn. Thanks.
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PossiblyNotGod
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Java and... I hate to say this.. Python.
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S-man10
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Enjoyable in what sense?
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kate-Bush
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(Original post by S-man10)
Enjoyable in what sense?
Idiot
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hello_shawn
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Coding as a hobby isn't enough to get a software development job. And if it's not what you're aspiring to do, it's unlikely to be relevant. For example, if you find C# interesting, you'll need more than just the programming language. You need to be well versed in your knowledge of .NET Framework and Visual Studio as well
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kate-Bush
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(Original post by ;79988916)
Java and... I hate to say this.. Python.
Ta love.

Is python especially difficult to learn, then?
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PossiblyNotGod
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(Original post by kate-Bush)
Ta love.

Is python especially difficult to learn, then?
No, it's commonly an introductory language as is Java. (at least not especially difficult compared to other languages such as c and c++)
I just dislike the syntax style of Python.
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S-man10
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(Original post by kate-Bush)
Idiot
My apologies for the typo. You still don't have to be a **** about it.

But to answer you question, it varies. And your question doesn't make sense. You could learn a whole list of languages but if they don't actually supplement what you do in the first place then there is not much point in learning.

Also merely learning a programming language doesn't do much good unless you can demonstrate through various project thats you are proficient in said programming language. 90% of learning programming is the practice.
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S-man10
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(Original post by ;79989008)
I just dislike the syntax style of Python.
You don't like print statements? :mmm:
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ParadoxSocks
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It's less the language and more the skills you develop when learning the languages. Pick one you enjoy, rather than concentrating on what will make you more employable.
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winterscoming
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(Original post by kate-Bush)
I'm going to learn a programming language so I can have something extra to boost my CV. Was wondering what the most useful one would be to learn. Thanks.
It depends what you'd like to do. A programming language is a tool for solving a problem; as with most tools, the "best" language depends upon the problem. A better approach is to start by thinking about the kinds of jobs you'd like to apply for and the kinds of problems you might be looking at solving.

For example, someone doing a lot of work in Excel could benefit from learning VBA. Unfortunately VBA is a bit of an unpleasant language to learn and work with, but it's very useful in any job which uses a lot of Microsoft Excel spreadsheets, although the kinds of things people write in VBA often end up being rather easy to break and a pain to keep fixing all the time.

Similarly, another language often worth learning (which isn't a programming language at all) would be SQL - this is a query language used for reading and transforming data stored in a database; most businesses these days tend to have a lot of data stored this way, so SQL and databases more generally are is quite transferrable skills even for non-technical people - with that said, you'd need to learn the bigger picture of Databases rather than just SQL

Or for anything involving the web, there are 3 'key' languages - HTML, CSS and JavaScript; these are the 3 languages which web browsers understand, so if you have any interest in building websites then these would be a good place to start.. JavaScript is the only 'programming' language out of those 3 though. HTML and CSS are for the layout and appearance of websites.

Python is a popular language for a lot of people who want to get their computer to automate tasks for them - with that said, Python on its own won't automate very much, you'd also need to learn a lot about the thing you're automating - for example, people use it to automate Windows tasks, or automate the handling of files containing a lot of data, or even automate tasks like 'web scraping' (reading data from websites). Python has a very human-friendly syntax (This is the reason why schools and GCSE exam boards use it for secondary level computing students) - if you're after an introductory programming language without any specific goal then Python is almost certainly the easiest starting point..

Finally there are languages which lend themselves to software engineering jobs like Java or C# or many others; these are tougher to learn than Python and realistically it's unlikely that you'd use these outside of a software engineering career. There's a lot more to learn than just a language for that, but it's entirely doable if you want to self-teach software engineering.
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kate-Bush
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#12
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#12
(Original post by winterscoming)
It depends what you'd like to do. A programming language is a tool for solving a problem; as with most tools, the "best" language depends upon the problem. A better approach is to start by thinking about the kinds of jobs you'd like to apply for and the kinds of problems you might be looking at solving.

For example, someone doing a lot of work in Excel could benefit from learning VBA. Unfortunately VBA is a bit of an unpleasant language to learn and work with, but it's very useful in any job which uses a lot of Microsoft Excel spreadsheets, although the kinds of things people write in VBA often end up being rather easy to break and a pain to keep fixing all the time.

Similarly, another language often worth learning (which isn't a programming language at all) would be SQL - this is a query language used for reading and transforming data stored in a database; most businesses these days tend to have a lot of data stored this way, so SQL and databases more generally are is quite transferrable skills even for non-technical people - with that said, you'd need to learn the bigger picture of Databases rather than just SQL

Or for anything involving the web, there are 3 'key' languages - HTML, CSS and JavaScript; these are the 3 languages which web browsers understand, so if you have any interest in building websites then these would be a good place to start.. JavaScript is the only 'programming' language out of those 3 though. HTML and CSS are for the layout and appearance of websites.

Python is a popular language for a lot of people who want to get their computer to automate tasks for them - with that said, Python on its own won't automate very much, you'd also need to learn a lot about the thing you're automating - for example, people use it to automate Windows tasks, or automate the handling of files containing a lot of data, or even automate tasks like 'web scraping' (reading data from websites). Python has a very human-friendly syntax (This is the reason why schools and GCSE exam boards use it for secondary level computing students) - if you're after an introductory programming language without any specific goal then Python is almost certainly the easiest starting point..

Finally there are languages which lend themselves to software engineering jobs like Java or C# or many others; these are tougher to learn than Python and realistically it's unlikely that you'd use these outside of a software engineering career. There's a lot more to learn than just a language for that, but it's entirely doable if you want to self-teach software engineering.
Thank you very much for a detailed answer. I think it might be worth me reconsidering my career goals before I jump into learning a programming language. Appreciate your answer, cheers.
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