clinical scientist vs biomedical scientist Watch

Lau1503
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What're the differences between a clinical scientist and biomedical scientist?
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University of Westminster
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(Original post by Lau1503)
What're the differences between a clinical scientist and biomedical scientist?
Hi there

Here's a brief breakdown of the differences between Clinical and Biomedical Science. For both jobs will need study to Undergraduate level plus have the relevant industry registration/accreditation e.g. IBMS, NHS Specialist Training Programme (STP)

Biomedical Scientist:

As a Biomedical Scientist, you could carry out tests for diseases such as Legionnaires disease, HIV and hepatitis. You could also process and analyse tissue samples from operations and postmortems to help diagnose cancer or other pathology.

You would specialise in one of three areas:

infection sciences - you’ll study the culture and identification of bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites that cause infection and disease, including infectious diseases

blood sciences – you’ll work in a hospital pathology laboratory and carry out tests on blood to diagnose illness, or match blood from donors, so it can be given to patients who require a blood transfusion

cellular sciences – you’ll analyse tissue cells to look for and identify abnormalities to make a diagnosis

Clinical Scientist:

As a Clinical Scientist in the laboratory, you could specialise in one of the following areas:

blood sciences – in biochemistry, for example, you’ll study chemical processes within living cells and tissues, including DNA and proteins. Alternatively, you could specialise in other branches of the blood sciences such as haematology or immunology

transplant sciences – as a scientist you will ensure that donated organs are matched to recipients and minimise immuno-rejection

genomics – you’ll study DNA sequences and genetic mapping to help improve early diagnosis of diseases and inherited traits

microbiology – you’ll study microbes, such as bacteria and viruses, to help in the prevention, diagnosis and control of infections and diseases

reproductive sciences – you will be involved in the science underpinning assisted conception sciences

Best wishes

Kim
Course Enquiries Team
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