ajsar
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
my question to all of you is how much did you revise a day and when did you start I'm a c grade student hoping to get these levels so I'm just asking so i can have an idea thanks!!
0
reply
-Bibliophile-
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
My biggest tip would be give classes your 100%. Pay attention and put your hand up, always do the homework and hand it in on time and ALWAYS try and do above and beyond with both homework and classwork in order to extend your knowledge and cement your understanding. My theory is that if you pay attention in class and then do solid homework the idea should already be in your head pretty steadfast, meaning that revision really is just revising what you know, rather than relearning things.!

In terms of studying, I studied around 8 hours a week a few months before exams and then closer to exams, I would do 1-2 hours on schoolnights and then 4-5 on the weekend. It doesn't sound like much as it was extremely irregular. Don't pressure yourself to get in every single hour if it means you lose out on sleep. I started revising around February/March but not independently. This meant going to after school and lunchtime revision clubs and talking to your friends and teachers about previous topics to refresh your memory. By May it was hardcore independent study like watching videos and doing practice questions. By the beginning of June, I would be doing timed practice papers almost every day.

Can I just add that revision is a very personal thing. There are people who revise lots and lots and come out with average grades and some who revise less and achieve 7/8/9. You have to do what you think works best with your lifestyle. I would get frustrated when somebody couldn't tell me exactly how many hours to study and when to start studying but having just started sixth form, I realise now how different everyone's techniques were and the similarity in the grades we achieved.

Look after yourself - Good luck!
0
reply
y.u.mad.bro?
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
I revised 1-2 hours a day including homework but 4-5 hours on weekends to go through all the stuff. Also, it's about the quality of revision and not the quantity so if you can be effective in 2 hours with no distractions, that is much better than sitting down for 10 hours and being on your phone every 5 minutes to check for messages. Rest has been summarised above for you ^^^ so read that too.
0
reply
VGM
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
I started off doing revision around September of year 11. I started off doing about 6 hours a week, alternating between subjects each week, and then I slowly increased that as I got closer to mocks and then the actual exams. I did the revision on top of the homework I was set, if the homework set was revision then I’d do revision as homework and then do my own personal revision on top of that. I also crammed the nights before exams (especially for English literature and geography) but I’m not sure if I would recommend that or not since it’s essentially a double edged sword

When I started off in September I just made notes, notes and even more notes. I just went through textbooks for each subject and making notes on everything that I didn’t already know off the top of my head. I also made notes on each case study we had covered for geography and made a quote bank for all the tests I was doing for English literature. A few weeks before mocks I started to do practice tests (which was very hard considering we were the first year to do many of the subjects so there were no past papers and no organisation was certain that their practice papers were accurate) and then went through the notes I had for the topics that I lost the most marks on. I repeated that again in the few weeks before the actual exams (and the days between each exam). In my opinion it’s quite hard to revise for maths, English language and any other foreign language. For maths I just did practice questions as it’s mostly just technique and knowing how to apply said technique. I really struggled when it came to preparing for English language and my foreign language, german. For german I learned the grammar rules, vocab and conjugation of irregular verbs. For English language you could also do some practice questions, for questions 2-4 and the writing task. For the writing task in English language you can go find a debate online and try to write something to persuade the reader to agree with either side, for the descriptive/creative writing task you can find an image online and write a piece based on the picture or a theme in the picture. Although you may not want to follow my advice for English language and german, I didn’t do too well in those 😓.

I have to agree with -Bibliophile- though. Revision is an individual thing. You can only use other people’s revision as a point of reference. There is no “one size fits all” when it comes to revision. Everyone has their own method and timings for revision that works best for them. Everyone has their own strengths and weaknesses so remember to set your timetable according to that, as well as to what you are planning on doing after GCSES. So if you’re planning on doing A-levels or something that requires certain grades then I’d prioritise those subjects as number one, your worst subjects for number two and everything else as lower priority for revision time.
0
reply
ajsar
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by VGM)
I started off doing revision around September of year 11. I started off doing about 6 hours a week, alternating between subjects each week, and then I slowly increased that as I got closer to mocks and then the actual exams. I did the revision on top of the homework I was set, if the homework set was revision then I’d do revision as homework and then do my own personal revision on top of that. I also crammed the nights before exams (especially for English literature and geography) but I’m not sure if I would recommend that or not since it’s essentially a double edged sword

When I started off in September I just made notes, notes and even more notes. I just went through textbooks for each subject and making notes on everything that I didn’t already know off the top of my head. I also made notes on each case study we had covered for geography and made a quote bank for all the tests I was doing for English literature. A few weeks before mocks I started to do practice tests (which was very hard considering we were the first year to do many of the subjects so there were no past papers and no organisation was certain that their practice papers were accurate) and then went through the notes I had for the topics that I lost the most marks on. I repeated that again in the few weeks before the actual exams (and the days between each exam). In my opinion it’s quite hard to revise for maths, English language and any other foreign language. For maths I just did practice questions as it’s mostly just technique and knowing how to apply said technique. I really struggled when it came to preparing for English language and my foreign language, german. For german I learned the grammar rules, vocab and conjugation of irregular verbs. For English language you could also do some practice questions, for questions 2-4 and the writing task. For the writing task in English language you can go find a debate online and try to write something to persuade the reader to agree with either side, for the descriptive/creative writing task you can find an image online and write a piece based on the picture or a theme in the picture. Although you may not want to follow my advice for English language and german, I didn’t do too well in those 😓.

I have to agree with -Bibliophile- though. Revision is an individual thing. You can only use other people’s revision as a point of reference. There is no “one size fits all” when it comes to revision. Everyone has their own method and timings for revision that works best for them. Everyone has their own strengths and weaknesses so remember to set your timetable according to that, as well as to what you are planning on doing after GCSES. So if you’re planning on doing A-levels or something that requires certain grades then I’d prioritise those subjects as number one, your worst subjects for number two and everything else as lower priority for revision time.
so do you think i should just drop learning all the maths topics and just do past papers??
0
reply
VGM
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by ajsar)
so do you think i should just drop learning all the maths topics and just do past papers??
What I’m saying is that you should do whatever you think works best. My method, arguably the most common method, worked for me and probably worked for many others but that doesn’t necessarily mean it will work for you. I know many people who did the same as I did, they went on to get a range of grades from 9 to 4 in maths. There are also people who used other methods and did well too. But you will have to practice questions anyway, if you want to practice exam technique.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Groningen
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 31 Jan '20
  • Sheffield Hallam University
    Course Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 2 Feb '20
  • University of Bath
    Postgraduate Virtual Open Day 5 February 2020, 11:00-15:00 (UK time) Postgraduate
    Wed, 5 Feb '20

Why do you want to do a masters?

Great for my career (60)
35.29%
I really love the subject (44)
25.88%
I don't know what else to do (22)
12.94%
I can't get a job (13)
7.65%
My parents want me to (4)
2.35%
I don't know... I just do (27)
15.88%

Watched Threads

View All