MushyPeas
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I'm studying Nazi economy. Just wondering if anyone could tell me about the agricultural side of schacht's new plan. i've found stuff about the mefo bills and trade but cant find anything on agriculture.
Any help welcome, I need a point in the right direction.
Thank you
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lazzyfuzzylou
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As far as I'm aware, the New Plan was a purely industrialised measure and so it wouldn't include agricultural methods - at a push, you could mention the policy of autarky (self-sufficiency) and therefore the need for increased production in rural areas to feed the workers..

However I just found my old AS notes and I've got some stuff about general agriculture under Schacht, which might help, so here you go.

He established the Landhilfe which was a version of the RAD in rural areas, basically to encourage young people (16-24 year olds) to volunteer to help in agriculture - so free labour. This was effective with 159,000 young people volunteering for the Landhilfe in 1933-34.

He also established the Reich Food Estate which was an organisation all German farmers had to join if they wanted to trade/sell their produce - by 1935 all 3 million German farms were a part of this and it led to greater state control, as well as availability of new efficient mechanics like tractors etc on a wider scale.

The Reich Entailed Farm Law (1935) also set prices and controlled wages for farms, which protected small farms against their larger competitors as there was a minimum fixed price at which goods could be sold.

Hope this helps!
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MushyPeas
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Thank you ever so much. Was starting to think i had copied my homework down wrong and agriculture wasn't in it!!
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Shuky
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(Original post by lazzyfuzzylou)
As far as I'm aware, the New Plan was a purely industrialised measure and so it wouldn't include agricultural methods - at a push, you could mention the policy of autarky (self-sufficiency) and therefore the need for increased production in rural areas to feed the workers..

However I just found my old AS notes and I've got some stuff about general agriculture under Schacht, which might help, so here you go.

He established the Landhilfe which was a version of the RAD in rural areas, basically to encourage young people (16-24 year olds) to volunteer to help in agriculture - so free labour. This was effective with 159,000 young people volunteering for the Landhilfe in 1933-34.

He also established the Reich Food Estate which was an organisation all German farmers had to join if they wanted to trade/sell their produce - by 1935 all 3 million German farms were a part of this and it led to greater state control, as well as availability of new efficient mechanics like tractors etc on a wider scale.

The Reich Entailed Farm Law (1935) also set prices and controlled wages for farms, which protected small farms against their larger competitors as there was a minimum fixed price at which goods could be sold.

Hope this helps!
You got any tips on how to get good grades on this papre because i already done it twice and got a C first and D second time with y other grades at A's and B's so far, its just the source based exams i struggle with and i really nead higher grades.
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lazzyfuzzylou
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I think I did a different exam board to you because when we did Schacht etc, it wasn't a source paper - sorry! What board are you?
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Shuky
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(Original post by lazzyfuzzylou)
I think I did a different exam board to you because when we did Schacht etc, it wasn't a source paper - sorry! What board are you?
Yh ours is a source paper as well i think im with OCR.
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made_of_fail
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just a note: the Entailed Farm Law had some seriously negative consequences. i'm not entirely sure, but i think it was due to the fixed ownership it instituted - this was intended to stop farm ownership changing hands (kept them in the family).
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lazzyfuzzylou
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^ Yes - it was basically like Russian serfdom and collectivisation combined. Alongside that, the fixed price scheme meant that larger farms couldn't actually make enough profit to keep themselves running, so many were bankrupt. Debate over whether this was intentional to force migration to the towns and participation in things like the Public Works Scheme?
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Anton Batbaianov
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(Original post by made_of_fail)
just a note: the Entailed Farm Law had some seriously negative consequences. i'm not entirely sure, but i think it was due to the fixed ownership it instituted - this was intended to stop farm ownership changing hands (kept them in the family).


(Original post by lazzyfuzzylou)
^ Yes - it was basically like Russian serfdom and collectivisation combined. Alongside that, the fixed price scheme meant that larger farms couldn't actually make enough profit to keep themselves running, so many were bankrupt. Debate over whether this was intentional to force migration to the towns and participation in things like the Public Works Scheme?

I was researching about the Reich Entailed Farm Law and just couldn't stop myself from registering into the forum in order to comment on those two stunning posts.


made_of_fail is saying that the law had some seriously negative consequences because the farm went from the fathers' hands to the sons' hands and wasn't splitted up and sold peace by peace. How the hell that broughtseriouslynegative consequences?! On the contrary, this policy saved the farms and they continued to feed the next owner.



Alongside that, the fixed price scheme meant that larger farms couldn't actually make enough profit to keep themselves running, so many were bankrupt.
Looks like lazzyfuzzylou had no idea what he is talking about. If he had red the law he would've known that nobody anymore was allowed to own a farm bigger than 125 hectares. And even if there was bigger farm, what would make them go bankrupt if the prices are fixed?!?! The philosophy in setting a price on something was that it would be high enough to make sure that the producer would live a normal live and low enough that everybody would be able to buy that product. So the bigger the farm the bigger the profit would be.
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korrin
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Hi, I know this is an old post however
(Original post by lazzyfuzzylou)
^ Yes - it was basically like Russian serfdom
I don't believe this is correct if the law specifically made farms hereditary and protected farmers from the feudal hierarchy the Courts of Social Honour tried to emulate (from heinemann advanced history)
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