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I had my first micro teach today (non-assessed, thankfully) and it didn't go as well as I had hoped. We were supposed to do a 10 minute lesson on anything but the subject that our PGCE is on, which is a bummer because my PGCE subject is all that I am good at.

Other people had really great lessons that were interactive and something that everyone enjoyed. E.g. someone did a salsa lesson. I am not good at practical stuff like that so I went with a history lesson on the English Civil War. Everyone was bored and clearly not as interested as they were in other people's lessons. When I tried to ask questions, no one wanted to answer.

When my lesson ended, no one applauded like they did for other people's lesson. There was just this dead silence. It made me just want to run out of the classroom.

I am worried that because I did so terribly in this micro teach, it means I will be a rubbish teacher. The thought of quitting makes me really sad because teaching is all I ever wanted to do but if I am not good, is there any point in continuing?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Constantine2018)
I had my first micro teach today (non-assessed, thankfully) and it didn't go as well as I had hoped. We were supposed to do a 10 minute lesson on anything but the subject that our PGCE is on, which is a bummer because my PGCE subject is all that I am good at.

Other people had really great lessons that were interactive and something that everyone enjoyed. E.g. someone did a salsa lesson. I am not good at practical stuff like that so I went with a history lesson on the English Civil War. Everyone was bored and clearly not as interested as they were in other people's lessons. When I tried to ask questions, no one wanted to answer.

When my lesson ended, no one applauded like they did for other people's lesson. There was just this dead silence. It made me just want to run out of the classroom.

I am worried that because I did so terribly in this micro teach, it means I will be a rubbish teacher. The thought of quitting makes me really sad because teaching is all I ever wanted to do but if I am not good, is there any point in continuing?
I understand it's not nice when you feel a teaching session hasn't gone very well but come on...perspective! It's a micro-teach. No-one died, no-one failed their examinations. it just wasn't an Outstanding. Shît happens...

Just put it behind you. We all have this - it's really not that deep. That's not to say it isn't worth reflecting on the lesson and seeing what you'd do differently next time (also, what went well)...but after that, then just put it away and move on.
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username4094562
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I understand it's not nice when you feel a teaching session hasn't gone very well but come on...perspective! It's a micro-teach. No-one died, no-one failed their examinations. it just wasn't an Outstanding. Shît happens...

Just put it behind you. We all have this - it's really not that deep. That's not to say it isn't worth reflecting on the lesson and seeing what you'd do differently next time (also, what went well)...but after that, then just put it away and move on.
You're right. Thanks. I guess I am just a bit too perfectionist about everything.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Constantine2018)
You're right. Thanks. I guess I am just a bit too perfectionist about everything.
It's fine And we've all done this - wanted every lesson to be an outstanding, creatively used every teaching resource we could find (no printing off TES for us), perfectly planned with creative starters and plenary - seating plan perfect, differentiation sorted....

Once you're QTS you'll be printing stuff off at midnight, having a card-sort in every lesson because it keeps them vaguely on task and wondering what a 'lesson plan' is after all, unless you've got a mocksted coming up... :lol:
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(Original post by Reality Check)
It's fine And we've all done this - wanted every lesson to be an outstanding, creatively used every teaching resource we could find (no printing off TES for us), perfectly planned with creative starters and plenary - seating plan perfect, differentiation sorted....

Once you're QTS you'll be printing stuff off at midnight, having a card-sort in every lesson because it keeps them vaguely on task and wondering what a 'lesson plan' is after all, unless you've got a mocksted coming up... :lol:
Somehow, unpredictable things will always happen in lessons no matter how much you plan.

I am going down the QTLS route as I am doing a PGCE in Post-Compulsory but the workload is the same. I have so many card-sorts I've already made, all on colourful paper.

What subject do you teach?
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Constantine2018)
I had my first micro teach today (non-assessed, thankfully) and it didn't go as well as I had hoped. We were supposed to do a 10 minute lesson on anything but the subject that our PGCE is on, which is a bummer because my PGCE subject is all that I am good at.

Other people had really great lessons that were interactive and something that everyone enjoyed. E.g. someone did a salsa lesson. I am not good at practical stuff like that so I went with a history lesson on the English Civil War. Everyone was bored and clearly not as interested as they were in other people's lessons. When I tried to ask questions, no one wanted to answer.

When my lesson ended, no one applauded like they did for other people's lesson. There was just this dead silence. It made me just want to run out of the classroom.

I am worried that because I did so terribly in this micro teach, it means I will be a rubbish teacher. The thought of quitting makes me really sad because teaching is all I ever wanted to do but if I am not good, is there any point in continuing?
Have you had feedback from a course leader? It sounds like the others went for entertainment over actually conveying some content. Ask a tutor how to improve - at this stage they are the only ones worth listening to.
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(Original post by Muttley79)
Have you had feedback from a course leader? It sounds like the others went for entertainment over actually conveying some content. Ask a tutor how to improve - at this stage they are the only ones worth listening to.
I had feedback from the tutors and they told me that I needed to make my topic more narrow and shorter because of the timing. I would have loved to have taught the subject that my PGCE is in because that's my true passion but we weren't allowed to.
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(Original post by Constantine2018)
Somehow, unpredictable things will always happen in lessons no matter how much you plan.

I am going down the QTLS route as I am doing a PGCE in Post-Compulsory but the workload is the same. I have so many card-sorts I've already made, all on colourful paper.

What subject do you teach?
I don't teach in schools any longer - I was biology and chemistry, then later went into adult learning. I still examine though. It's great to hear someone doing QTLS: it's a really rewarding area (and the behaviour, by and large, is SO much better. You're also insulated from the whims of SLT a bit more and, early on in your career, are treated a bit more like a professional).

Embrace the card-sorts. Those and word-searches for the low ability groups. Saved my bacon on many an occasion
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I don't teach in schools any longer - I was biology and chemistry, then later went into adult learning. I still examine though. It's great to hear someone doing QTLS: it's a really rewarding area (and the behaviour, by and large, is SO much better. You're also insulated from the whims of SLT a bit more and, early on in your career, are treated a bit more like a professional).

Embrace the card-sorts. Those and word-searches for the low ability groups. Saved my bacon on many an occasion
I did originally think of going into secondary but decided against it precisely because of behaviour management and the bureaucracy. :laugh:

I don't really know many people doing post-compulsory/QTLS. I thought it would be more popular, considering it is more flexible than primary and secondary.

Yeah, I love the card-sorts. I've also bought a whole load of grammar books to help me brush up on some of the terminology I rarely use.
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(Original post by Constantine2018)
I did originally think of going into secondary but decided against it precisely because of behaviour management and the bureaucracy. :laugh:

I don't really know many people doing post-compulsory/QTLS. I thought it would be more popular, considering it is more flexible than primary and secondary.

Yeah, I love the card-sorts. I've also bought a whole load of grammar books to help me brush up on some of the terminology I rarely use.
I think you'd have to be literally crazy to go into secondary now. The underfunding, the pressures of academy trusts all having their own obsessions and fads which change wildly at a moment's notice... I just can't see why anyone would want to do it! I know what you mean about QTLS - it's always surprised me that people don't do it to give themselves that flexibility.

How's the PGCE going? Do you enjoy the pedagogy or are you more of a 'get in there and teach 'em' kind of person?
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(Original post by Reality Check)
I think you'd have to be literally crazy to go into secondary now. The underfunding, the pressures of academy trusts all having their own obsessions and fads which change wildly at a moment's notice... I just can't see why anyone would want to do it! I know what you mean about QTLS - it's always surprised me that people don't do it to give themselves that flexibility.

How's the PGCE going? Do you enjoy the pedagogy or are you more of a 'get in there and teach 'em' kind of person?
When I was doing work experience at a secondary school, I could see how exhausted the teachers were. The amount of work expected of you at secondary is not even compensated by a good salary. I applaud people who are still undaunted by all the problems and go in for secondary teaching.

I quite like the pedagogy and theoretical aspects. Today, I had a class on the four skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening. It made me more aware of how vital these skills are and I never realised that I am constantly using them to do even the simplest task. I can't imagine how difficult it must be for ESOL learners to do certain things when they struggle with these skills.

I still haven't really started my placements. The colleges are taking forever to get back to me because they are still enrolling people on the ESOL and Literacy classes.
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(Original post by Constantine2018)
When I was doing work experience at a secondary school, I could see how exhausted the teachers were. The amount of work expected of you at secondary is not even compensated by a good salary. I applaud people who are still undaunted by all the problems and go in for secondary teaching.

I quite like the pedagogy and theoretical aspects. Today, I had a class on the four skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening. It made me more aware of how vital these skills are and I never realised that I am constantly using them to do even the simplest task. I can't imagine how difficult it must be for ESOL learners to do certain things when they struggle with these skills.

I still haven't really started my placements. The colleges are taking forever to get back to me because they are still enrolling people on the ESOL and Literacy classes.
Hi,

I also did my first microteach today- fortunately we were allowed to do it on a subject topic. At the end our tutor gave us loads of general feedback (like to the group, not just me) and I was convinced everything he was saying was solely directed at me- but then someone else came up to me afterwards and said she thought I'd done well!

I think it's best not to worry about things like applause/reactions in the moment and just think about things you can work on. You can't control people being interested in your topic, but you can perhaps work on timings if they are a problem and have a plan for if no-one wants to answer your questions?

I'm sure it wasn't as bad as you thought!

(Original post by Reality Check)
I think you'd have to be literally crazy to go into secondary now. The underfunding, the pressures of academy trusts all having their own obsessions and fads which change wildly at a moment's notice... I just can't see why anyone would want to do it! I know what you mean about QTLS - it's always surprised me that people don't do it to give themselves that flexibility.

How's the PGCE going? Do you enjoy the pedagogy or are you more of a 'get in there and teach 'em' kind of person?
The bursaries for training though- as a career changer it's the only way I feel I can afford to go in to teaching- but I'm not convinced I'm going to stay in Secondary long term. I know that sounds awful! I do like the secondary age group best (I've taught all ages from 5-70 in a hobby setting, but obviously it's very different).

Also I do like the idea of the pastoral side of things at secondary- I feel you lose that a bit post-16!
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
The bursaries for training though- as a career changer it's the only way I feel I can afford to go in to teaching- but I'm not convinced I'm going to stay in Secondary long term. I know that sounds awful! I do like the secondary age group best (I've taught all ages from 5-70 in a hobby setting, but obviously it's very different).

Also I do like the idea of the pastoral side of things at secondary- I feel you lose that a bit post-16!
You might know even by the time you've finished your NQT year that secondary isn't for you! I'm always going to come across as a bit jaded and cynical - I too was wide-eyed and enthusiastic once! That's not to patronise you in any way, and it's always nice to hear students so enthusiastic about things. The only thing I'd say about the pastoral side of things at secondary is that it does very much depend on the school you're in. A lot have this rather tied up with Student Services, and the only 'pastoral' stuff you do is if you've got a tutor group. Even then, the pressures of your teaching schedule mean that pastoral provision often has to go to the bottom of the queue, whilst you fanny about with yet another marking scheme SLT have introduced using THREE different coloured pens this time...

It's good that you like Secondary though - god knows we need as many as we can get!
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(Original post by Constantine2018)
When I was doing work experience at a secondary school, I could see how exhausted the teachers were. The amount of work expected of you at secondary is not even compensated by a good salary. I applaud people who are still undaunted by all the problems and go in for secondary teaching.
It's quite ludicrous now. There's no amount of TLR3s which can compensate.

I quite like the pedagogy and theoretical aspects. Today, I had a class on the four skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening. It made me more aware of how vital these skills are and I never realised that I am constantly using them to do even the simplest task. I can't imagine how difficult it must be for ESOL learners to do certain things when they struggle with these skills.
.
Absolutely. I love all that 'under the bonnet' stuff.
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jonathanemptage
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(Original post by Constantine2018)
I had my first micro teach today (non-assessed, thankfully) and it didn't go as well as I had hoped. We were supposed to do a 10 minute lesson on anything but the subject that our PGCE is on, which is a bummer because my PGCE subject is all that I am good at.

Other people had really great lessons that were interactive and something that everyone enjoyed. E.g. someone did a salsa lesson. I am not good at practical stuff like that so I went with a history lesson on the English Civil War. Everyone was bored and clearly not as interested as they were in other people's lessons. When I tried to ask questions, no one wanted to answer.

When my lesson ended, no one applauded like they did for other people's lesson. There was just this dead silence. It made me just want to run out of the classroom.

I am worried that because I did so terribly in this micro teach, it means I will be a rubbish teacher. The thought of quitting makes me really sad because teaching is all I ever wanted to do but if I am not good, is there any point in continuing?
When I did my ski instructor course a few of the guys i was training with had an awful micro lesson don't worry too much as you say it wasn't assessed net time do something a little light more light hearted the Civil war is pretty heavy (I found it pretty boring when i did it t school) and some people don't like history. Maybe you could have don some of the Forbidden history things that has a much wider appeal base.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by Reality Check)
You might know even by the time you've finished your NQT year that secondary isn't for you! I'm always going to come across as a bit jaded and cynical - I too was wide-eyed and enthusiastic once! That's not to patronise you in any way, and it's always nice to hear students so enthusiastic about things. The only thing I'd say about the pastoral side of things at secondary is that it does very much depend on the school you're in. A lot have this rather tied up with Student Services, and the only 'pastoral' stuff you do is if you've got a tutor group. Even then, the pressures of your teaching schedule mean that pastoral provision often has to go to the bottom of the queue, whilst you fanny about with yet another marking scheme SLT have introduced using THREE different coloured pens this time...

It's good that you like Secondary though - god knows we need as many as we can get!
I think it does vary a lot from school to school, but in some schools I think you can still make a pastoral career- I don't really have any desire to go down the HoD route but at the moment I sort of like the idea of being a head of year or involved in the house structure.

I totally get that some schools are ridiculous and the other advantage of getting a big bursary and being in a shortage subject is I intend to be picky about the school I go and teach in- and if I don't like a particular school it's very likely I can try another one!

I know the workload is going to be insane- but I've worked in other jobs where the workload has been pretty mental too, and at least teaching has the holidays.

I do think the decision I'm making is about as informed as it can possibly be- and I agree I might know by the end of the NQT year it's not for me or be one of those people jumping ship two years in to go and teach abroad!
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
I think it does vary a lot from school to school, but in some schools I think you can still make a pastoral career- I don't really have any desire to go down the HoD route but at the moment I sort of like the idea of being a head of year or involved in the house structure.

I totally get that some schools are ridiculous and the other advantage of getting a big bursary and being in a shortage subject is I intend to be picky about the school I go and teach in- and if I don't like a particular school it's very likely I can try another one!

I know the workload is going to be insane- but I've worked in other jobs where the workload has been pretty mental too, and at least teaching has the holidays.

I do think the decision I'm making is about as informed as it can possibly be- and I agree I might know by the end of the NQT year it's not for me or be one of those people jumping ship two years in to go and teach abroad!
Absolutely. and you don't come across as some naïf student who thinks it's all about 'making a difference' and all that stuff about insane workloads etc is probably just teachers moaning about nothing. What's your subject - I'm guessing something like physics, given you've said it's a shortage subject.
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(Original post by Constantine2018)
I had feedback from the tutors and they told me that I needed to make my topic more narrow and shorter because of the timing. I would have loved to have taught the subject that my PGCE is in because that's my true passion but we weren't allowed to.
OK so maybe you could have focused on one key battle or the way the Civil War split families?
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Absolutely. and you don't come across as some naïf student who thinks it's all about 'making a difference' and all that stuff about insane workloads etc is probably just teachers moaning about nothing. What's your subject - I'm guessing something like physics, given you've said it's a shortage subject.
Biology, so not quite as shortage as physics, but shortage enough that they are chucking a huge bursary at me. I also have Chemistry A-level, and a lot of schools don't have subject specialist teachers before A-level.

I'm aware the workload will be pretty mad, especially in term time. I'm hoping that government will respond to the retention crisis and do something about this pretty sharpish (that's probably naive though).

I would say most of the people I've spoken to so far (mostly also science PGCEs) don't seem super naive- although a few definitely are!
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Hey!

As everyone above has said, a bad lesson isn't the end of the world. I know people who had bad lesson observations whilst on placement, and are continuing into year 2-- you aren't going to be expected to miraculously be 'outstanding' all the time. It's learning, it's a training course, which means realistically, we could go in without any idea of how to teach and learn how to over the degree.

EVERY teacher has off days. We have lessons where we look back and think why did I even try to do that I have said that to myself so much! You'll learn tricks and pedagogical factors and about hooks to get people interested. It isn't about interest all the time, but engagement. Plan activities rather than talking for ages etc etc.

Please don't feel disheartened. As for the fact no one wanted to answer questions, maybe they just weren't secure enough in their knowledge. In which case, in a school setting, you could acknowledge this and take appropriate steps to go back over the topic/area again to secure the knowledge.

Over my last placement I asked children questions all the time (I am primary) and when they couldn't answer, it just meant I needed to cover it a bit more. 10 minutes isn't a lesson, it is a taster, so make sure you plan for it to be just that. An introduction to a topic etc.

SarcAndSpark glad yours went well! As you say, feedback from tutors is crucial, but also remember they have high standards a lot of the time haha! Being in school on placement is so different in general, I find it way less stressful than my bridging days (1 day a week for 4 weeks in a school setting., rotating classes and doing directed tasks).

Good luck to you both! Give me a shout if you need anything, more than happy to lend a hand.
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