TSR Food Week 2018: Do you care about the carbon footprint of your meals?

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Charlotte's Web
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Today as part of TSR Food Week 2018, we're asking:

Do you care about the carbon footprint and food miles of your meals?

One of the relatively newer ideas surrounding food in society is the emphasis on the carbon footprint of meals. This takes into account all of the carbon produced from growth to production, transport and packaging of food.

There is also more emphasis on reduction of food miles, with many shops and supermarkets now advertising their local and British produce.


Do you think about the carbon footprint of your meals?

Do you buy locally to cut down on food miles? Do you look at where your food comes from?
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by Charlotte's Web)
Today as part of TSR Food Week 2018, we're asking:

Do you care about the carbon footprint and food miles of your meals?

One of the relatively newer ideas surrounding food in society is the emphasis on the carbon footprint of meals. This takes into account all of the carbon produced from growth to production, transport and packaging of food.

There is also more emphasis on reduction of food miles, with many shops and supermarkets now advertising their local and British produce.


Do you think about the carbon footprint of your meals?

Do you buy locally to cut down on food miles? Do you look at where your food comes from?
I'm sure there is a local farm shop if I drive about 30-40 minutes from where I am, but as a student with limited funds, it is not very practical.

I do buy my produce from supermarkets (Lidl and Tesco mainly). A lot of their produce say they're grown in Britain etc. but I'd imagine they're not very local and still rely on diesel-guzzling refrigerated lorries chugging down the motorway.

But in all honesty, no, I don't look at my 500g pack of mince or 2kg sack of Russet Burbanks and think about the number of food miles.
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Lachielemon17
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as part of our family it has always been about fresh produce we own a farm about 3 hours from adelaide and we source all or meat and vegetable ensuring quality and satisfaction

our carbon footprint is low and that is due to not driving we use transport like bikes and walking instead of wasting fuel 😊
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sinfonietta
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It's not something I've ever considered.

I buy milk from the farm I live nextdoor to, and often buy produce grown in the UK whether from a local supermarket or farmer markets, but it's not really something I do for moral reasons. I think it's more influenced by the area I live in.
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Charlotte's Web
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
I'm sure there is a local farm shop if I drive about 30-40 minutes from where I am, but as a student with limited funds, it is not very practical.

I do buy my produce from supermarkets (Lidl and Tesco mainly). A lot of their produce say they're grown in Britain etc. but I'd imagine they're not very local and still rely on diesel-guzzling refrigerated lorries chugging down the motorway.

But in all honesty, no, I don't look at my 500g pack of mince or 2kg sack of Russet Burbanks and think about the number of food miles.
I agree with the 'made in Britain' marketing. It's also often not clear whether things are actually produced in Britain or just processed/packaged here sometimes. It's also difficult to know how many miles are acceptable for each food source, should we look for things produced in Britain or within a 50 mile radius, and does it vary by type of food?


(Original post by Lachielemon17)
as part of our family it has always been about fresh produce we own a farm about 3 hours from adelaide and we source all or meat and vegetable ensuring quality and satisfaction

our carbon footprint is low and that is due to not driving we use transport like bikes and walking instead of wasting fuel 😊
That sounds great, you're very lucky to have that sort of resource. Do you buy any food or do you try to be completely self-sustainable?


(Original post by sinfonietta)
It's not something I've ever considered.

I buy milk from the farm I live nextdoor to, and often buy produce grown in the UK whether from a local supermarket or farmer markets, but it's not really something I do for moral reasons. I think it's more influenced by the area I live in.
I also like to try to support local producers, the difficulty is that sometimes they don't have as much availability as supermarkets and the cost increase can be much higher (depending where you shop).
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Lachielemon17
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We try and be self sustainable as much as possible as we trade good to farmers for the things we need ect
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1secondsofvamps
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It's not something I obsess over but it is something thats on my mind when I buy things.
I try to only buy things I really need and try to avoid plastic packaging if I can.
Other than that im not really sure how else I can reduce my carbon footprint when doing a good shop.
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