Fermi paradox Watch

rasputshealthbar
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The topic came up today, so I‘m curious to know if anyone here has anything interesting to add to the enigma.
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Humble Ahm
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We have limited understanding and technological resources to even look for alien life. Humans are very arrogant beings, they think they are the only intelligent life on this universe. When infact we have very little knowledge of how things are at work in this universe. There could be number of reasons for many different things but since we can't comprehend them, it does not exist for us.
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rasputshealthbar
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(Original post by Humble Ahm)
We have limited understanding and technological resources to even look for alien life. Humans are very arrogant beings, they think they are the only intelligent life on this universe. When infact we have very little knowledge of how things are at work in this universe. There could be number of reasons for many different things but since we can't comprehend them, it does not exist for us.
That’s a good way of looking at it. So you think that because evidence for other intelligent life forms isn’t explicitly visible (yet), they don’t really ‘exist’ in a sense to us?
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yudothis
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Maybe they did visit but decided we are too primitive to exploit. Or they visited thousands of years ago when we didn't really exist yet.

Space is vast, it does not seem unreasonable to me that existing highly intelligent aliens would not have visited this tiny speck in space within a x-thousand year time frame.
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Humble Ahm
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(Original post by krissxkross)
That’s a good way of looking at it. So you think that because evidence for other intelligent life forms isn’t explicitly visible (yet), they don’t really ‘exist’ in a sense to us?
If 100 years ago you told someone that a hand held wireless device can be made to contact anyone anywhere, would anyone believe?

I believe in invisible beings but if I told anyone they would laugh at me why? Because we can't see them so they don't exist. For us to believe there must be tangible proof or scientific explanation of some sort. But we must also realize that we have very limited knowledge about universe, we are not at the stage to make assumptions based on our understanding. We are like frog of the well whose understanding of the whole world starts and ends with the well.
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tazarooni89
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The Fermi paradox says that, since there are so many billions of other planets, some of them should be habitable and have developed life, and some of those should have developed life which is so advanced that it can travel and communicate through space, and some of those species should have made some attempt to visit or contact us by now... so why haven't they?

The problem is that all of these things are so improbable that, even if there are billions of other planets on which this could happen, it's still very unlikely.

First of all, of all the planets we know about, planet Earth is the only one which has been consistently habitable enough to develop life. So this in itself is very unlikely. Secondly, there are millions of different species residing on planet Earth, but humans are the only species to have come anywhere near developing the technology for space travel and communication. So this is even more unlikely. And even then, the furthest a human has ever been able to travel is to the moon, which in astronomical terms is not very far at all; the inhospitable conditions, the sheer distances and times of the journeys, the need to pack enough food and fuel to last the entire trip etc. has made it impossible for us to travel any further so far.

Making contact with alien life forms is difficult even for us, because habitable planets are so sparse that they are hard to find in the first place. Even if we find them, the likelihood that they have any life at all is miniscule, let alone intelligent life that we can communicate with or that has space travel technology. And even if we were to find intelligent life there, there are many practical problems with trying to actually get there.


Earth has existed for 4.6 billion years already (almost 1/3 of the universe's entire life), and this is as far as we have managed to get from here. It's not hard to see why, for any other planet, it's also extremely unlikely for it to have developed life that can visit and contact us. Yes, there are billions of other planets in the universe, but this might just not be enough to ensure the likelihood of such life developing. Also remember that some of these planets are so far away that, even if alien life could travel at the speed of light, it would still be impossible for them or their communications to have reached us yet. The further away these planets are, the more difficult it is to even know about the life that exists on it, let alone make contact.
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