amreensameer
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what are the language features used in the poem war photographer
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FudgeIt
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(Original post by amreensameer)
what are the language features used in the poem war photographer
The one by Carol Ann Duffy or Carole Satyamurti (or any other poet)?
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amreensameer
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(Original post by FudgeIt)
The one by Carol Ann Duffy or Carole Satyamurti (or any other poet)?
yes carol ann duffys poem
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FudgeIt
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(Original post by amreensameer)
yes carol ann duffys poem
Alright, so I haven’t really come across it before (I’m on Edexcel spec, not AQA) but I’ll try my best. I can state a few language techniques and I‘ll try to do some effects:

Structure:
• Sibilance (‘spools of suffering’) - the sibilance highlights this idea of it being ‘spools’. Note: this is also used as a juxtaposition to ‘ordered rows’.
• Caesura is used quite a lot - illustrates how abrupt war is, increases the pace of the poem and adds to tension
• ABBCDDEFF... rhyme scheme - it’s quite an awkward rhyme scheme, sense of insecurity

Language:
• Colour imagery (‘red’, ‘black and white’), connotations of death, simplicity/futility
• Semantic field of death (‘agonies, blood’) and of course, suffering for the ‘war photographer’
• Simile (‘as though this were a church’)
• Religious imagery - the above quote (‘as though this were a church and he a priest preparing to intone a Mass’) - thus it implicitly links to morals and ethics forcing the reader to question the righteousness of war - is pride and nationalism worth all these ‘agonies’. Moreover, the ‘war photographer’ is trying to emphasise how these photos have power and the ability to change people’s minds
• Another key quote: ‘All flash is grass’ is yet another bibilic reference. This reiterates the idea that all life is fragile
• Emotive language - ‘running children in a nightmare heat’, evokes sympathy from the reader, war is an omnipotent force which can affect all

Welp, quite an in depth analysis. As I said, this is literally unseen poetry for me but literature has no right or wrong answer. They’re all just alternative interpretations - hope it helps! Feel free to ask for any extra help at any time. :>
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Tolgarda
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(Original post by FudgeIt)
Alright, so I haven’t really come across it before (I’m on Edexcel spec, not AQA)...
U wot m8? I'm pretty sure this is in Edexcel's Power and Conflict poetry anthology as well, seeing as I remember doing it.
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
U wot m8? I'm pretty sure this is in Edexcel's Power and Conflict poetry anthology as well, seeing as I remember doing it.
‘War Photographer’ is in the Edexcel Power and Conflict anthology but the Carole Satyamurti version, not by Duffy.
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Tolgarda
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(Original post by FudgeIt)
‘War Photographer’ is in the Edexcel Power and Conflict anthology but the Carole Satyamurti version, not by Duffy.
O s**t lmao. Fair enough. F**k man, how many are there?
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
O s**t lmao. Fair enough. F**k man, how many are there?
I’ve heard there’s another one in the OCR gcse xD
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amreensameer
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(Original post by fudgeit)
alright, so i haven’t really come across it before (i’m on edexcel spec, not aqa) but i’ll try my best. I can state a few language techniques and i‘ll try to do some effects:

Structure:
• sibilance (‘spools of suffering’) - the sibilance highlights this idea of it being ‘spools’. Note: This is also used as a juxtaposition to ‘ordered rows’.
• caesura is used quite a lot - illustrates how abrupt war is, increases the pace of the poem and adds to tension
• abbcddeff... Rhyme scheme - it’s quite an awkward rhyme scheme, sense of insecurity

language:
• colour imagery (‘red’, ‘black and white’), connotations of death, simplicity/futility
• semantic field of death (‘agonies, blood’) and of course, suffering for the ‘war photographer’
• simile (‘as though this were a church’)
• religious imagery - the above quote (‘as though this were a church and he a priest preparing to intone a mass’) - thus it implicitly links to morals and ethics forcing the reader to question the righteousness of war - is pride and nationalism worth all these ‘agonies’. Moreover, the ‘war photographer’ is trying to emphasise how these photos have power and the ability to change people’s minds
• another key quote: ‘all flash is grass’ is yet another bibilic reference. This reiterates the idea that all life is fragile
• emotive language - ‘running children in a nightmare heat’, evokes sympathy from the reader, war is an omnipotent force which can affect all

welp, quite an in depth analysis. As i said, this is literally unseen poetry for me but literature has no right or wrong answer. They’re all just alternative interpretations - hope it helps! Feel free to ask for any extra help at any time. :>
thankyou
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