a bit confused when cooking chicken Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
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I don't understand what people mean when they talk about cross contamination when cooking chicken. If the chicken touches a spatula while the chicken is still raw and that spatula touches a fork and the fork touches a random pan that is lying about, do I have to wash each of all of these items and any further items that enter this chain even if i didnt use them?
Also if this is the case do I have to wash any surfaces the packaging touches or anything the juice inside the packaging touches.
And when washing surfaces that come into contact with chicken, will some fairy liquid on a scrubby sponge be sufficient to clean the surface.
when im pan frying the chicken or using the oven to cook it aswell and i flip it over with a spatula does the spatula now have salmonella on it because it touched the part of the chicken that was raw, and hence do i have to clean everything the spatula comes into contact with?

p.s im not trolling im really unconfident when it comes to cooking and am abit insecure about it which is why im so bad at it becuase it cuases me to just shy away from it all the time so i don't improve.
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JaseyB
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After you have last used your utensils surface areas clean them down and bleach them rinse them well and let them dry before next using them to prepare food. When people talk about cross contamination they are usually talking of bacteria from other meats - usually for busy commercial kitchens rather than your at home kitchen it's not very often a home kitchen would be used to simaultaenously cook different meats.
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Vinny C
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Do it until it looks right and always defrost a chicken first. Eyes and noses are the cook's best friends.
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Vinny C
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And by defrost I mean 24 hrs in the fridge, not 14 mins in the microwave.
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sknudson
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I'm assuming you're cooking at home rather than in a restaurant where health and safety rules are rightfully overboard. While frozen and raw, the risk of salmonella contamination is quite low, so washing rules needn't apply when things are just coming out of the freezer and getting started. Your risk is also pretty low when you're cooking if you're using high enough temperatures to kill any bacteria present. There is some risk using the utensils and whatnot while your meat is reaching the proper temperature and you could wash if you were particularly concerned, but it's probably going overboard. Salmonella risk applies more when you're cooking at a temperature that's too low and/or leaving warm food out of cooking temperatures for too long (hours). For what it's worth, a quick Google search says holding chicken at 160 F for 14 seconds will kill 99.9% of bacteria.
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snugglebear
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I would answer yes to all your questions. when you are cooking with chicken you have to be very careful. whatever it comes into contact with is now a risk, as you said. so choose a fork or spoon to flip it, handle it and poke it with. ideally don't touch it with your bare hands, but if you do you have to wash your hands before touching anything else (which will be diffficult when it comes to turning on taps), you can also use plastic gloves. be careful of where you leave the fork you handled the chicken with (the prongs point up so don't have to come into direct contact with the surface beneath). make sure you remember this fork is dirty. I think fairy liquid should be enough to clean the cutlery or work surface, but you could also get a kitchen detergent spray, one that says it kills 99.9% of bacteria and viruses.
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snugglebear
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another question that I worry about is when the chicken is about 80% done and nearly there, should I still use the same fork to prod it with which I used when it was totally raw, and I think the safe answer is probably no as that one probably has loads of bacteria on it.
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by snugglebear)
another question that I worry about is when the chicken is about 80% done and nearly there, should I still use the same fork to prod it with which I used when it was totally raw, and I think the safe answer is probably no as that one probably has loads of bacteria on it.
Use a meat thermometer and probe the thickest part of the meat Once it's 75 degrees centigrade it's fully cooked
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Royal Oak
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Don't wash the chicken in the sink
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Frigateer
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I don't understand what people mean when they talk about cross contamination when cooking chicken. If the chicken touches a spatula while the chicken is still raw and that spatula touches a fork and the fork touches a random pan that is lying about, do I have to wash each of all of these items and any further items that enter this chain even if i didnt use them?
Also if this is the case do I have to wash any surfaces the packaging touches or anything the juice inside the packaging touches.
And when washing surfaces that come into contact with chicken, will some fairy liquid on a scrubby sponge be sufficient to clean the surface.
when im pan frying the chicken or using the oven to cook it aswell and i flip it over with a spatula does the spatula now have salmonella on it because it touched the part of the chicken that was raw, and hence do i have to clean everything the spatula comes into contact with?

p.s im not trolling im really unconfident when it comes to cooking and am abit insecure about it which is why im so bad at it becuase it cuases me to just shy away from it all the time so i don't improve.
I'm not really sure how this 'chain' is even coming about? If the spatula is used for chicken, that now becomes the 'chicken spatula' until the next time it is washed properly. Either keep it in the pan, get a plate to put it on, or put it in the sink, don't go touching everything else with it. Assume that anything that touches raw chicken is contaminated, and anything that touches something contaminated is also contaminated. You don't need to wash anything if it's only touched the outside of the packaging, but if it's touched the juices or the inside of the packaging then yes, wash it.

It's always best to err on the side of caution when handling raw meat. If you think it needs to be washed, wash it. It takes 10 seconds, max. Fairy liquid and water is sufficient (and contrary to what people think, cold water is fine. If it was hot enough to kill germs you'd scald yourself). And don't be one of those people who washes there hands in dish soap, you'll get germs on the bottle. Buy a bottle of hand soap and use it any time you touch raw meat

Have a read through of this as well:
https://www.safefood.eu/Food-safety/...amination.aspx
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