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katmyster
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I’m thinking of studying in America and because I would like to study medicine I am also thinking of doing an undergraduate course in biology or biochemistry at Harvard or another top US uni and then returning to do a graduate medicine(4year course).

I understand I am adding time onto my higher education and for reference I am in year 12 doing biology,chemistry and maths predicted A/A*s.

What is the practicalities with this route to do medicine? Do UK unis accept an international undergraduate degree? Would I be classed as an international student having been out of the country for the past 4 years? How likely would I be to get a FULL scholarship to somewhere like Harvard? Would my uk medicine degree be funded because it would technically be my ‘first’ degree in the UK.

Thankyou in advance for taking the time to read this
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RenéDescartes
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You won't become an international student because you've been out of the UK for 4 years lol. UK unis do accept international undergraduate degrees, especially from HARVARD. Scholarship depends on soo many things: your family's financial situation, whether or not you're an elite athlete, and etc.

Here is some information about financial aid: https://college.harvard.edu/financia...ional-students
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katmyster
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Thankyou for that! Regarding financial situation I know my household income is less then £30,000 a year would this make me eligible for a full scholarship?
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Doones
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(Original post by katmyster)
I’m thinking of studying in America and because I would like to study medicine I am also thinking of doing an undergraduate course in biology or biochemistry at Harvard or another top US uni and then returning to do a graduate medicine(4year course).

I understand I am adding time onto my higher education and for reference I am in year 12 doing biology,chemistry and maths predicted A/A*s.

What is the practicalities with this route to do medicine? Do UK unis accept an international undergraduate degree? Would I be classed as an international student having been out of the country for the past 4 years? How likely would I be to get a FULL scholarship to somewhere like Harvard? Would my uk medicine degree be funded because it would technically be my ‘first’ degree in the UK.

Thankyou in advance for taking the time to read this
If you do plan on going down this path I recommend you also apply to UK medschools for standard entry next year - Harvard is *extremely* competitive and admissions are based on a lot more than just your academics. I wouldn't put all your eggs in the Harvard (or wider US university) route at all.

Also graduate entry medicine is more competitive, not less, than standard entry.

PS. I've moved this to the Medicine forum - but left a link from International Study

PPS. Look at the stickied threads in this forum regarding US applications
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=227
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RenéDescartes
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(Original post by katmyster)
Thankyou for that! Regarding financial situation I know my household income is less then £30,000 a year would this make me eligible for a full scholarship?
According to the link, if your family makes under USD$65,000, then you pay $0. 30,000 pounds is roughly USD$40,000. It looks like you are eligible. Like Doones said, it is super competitive so don't get your hopes up because you can afford to go. My friend last year got 44/45 IB, and 1600/1600 SATs and couldn't secure a place at Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, and etc. He ended up opting for UChicago.
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katmyster
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Thankyou and yes I am still considering UK med schools as I understand the nature of how competitive places like Harvard are.
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steveeem
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(Original post by katmyster)
I’m thinking of studying in America and because I would like to study medicine I am also thinking of doing an undergraduate course in biology or biochemistry at Harvard or another top US uni and then returning to do a graduate medicine(4year course).

I understand I am adding time onto my higher education and for reference I am in year 12 doing biology,chemistry and maths predicted A/A*s.

What is the practicalities with this route to do medicine? Do UK unis accept an international undergraduate degree? Would I be classed as an international student having been out of the country for the past 4 years? How likely would I be to get a FULL scholarship to somewhere like Harvard? Would my uk medicine degree be funded because it would technically be my ‘first’ degree in the UK.

Thankyou in advance for taking the time to read this
it's Harvard so I'm afraid I believe you would need at least 3A*s prediction and probably ideally 4 subjects. not trying to kill your dreams but don't bare your life on harvard
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RenéDescartes
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(Original post by steveeem)
it's Harvard so I'm afraid I believe you would need at least 3A*s prediction and probably ideally 4 subjects. not trying to kill your dreams but don't bare your life on harvard
Not true. Harvard admissions standard is the same as Oxbridge: AAA or 39 IB minimum. The hardest part about Harvard isn't the grade; the hardest part is that they're looking for people are do lots of volunteer work, are leaders of groups/societies/clubs at their school, do lots of interesting things other than studying, and etc. They're looking for people who are on their way to become future leaders, and has good grades.Oxbridge is similar to Harvard in a way; AAA doesn't guarantee a place at Oxbridge because they're looking for someone who is passionate about what they want to study, and can demonstrate that in different areas of their life. Oxbridge is looking for someone passionate, and has good grades.
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steveeem
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(Original post by RenéDescartes)
Not true. Harvard admissions standard is the same as Oxbridge: AAA or 39 IB minimum. The hardest part about Harvard isn't the grade; the hardest part is that they're looking for people are do lots of volunteer work, are leaders of groups/societies/clubs at their school, do lots of interesting things other than studying, and etc. They're looking for people who are on their way to become future leaders, and has good grades.Oxbridge is similar to Harvard in a way; AAA doesn't guarantee a place at Oxbridge because they're looking for someone who is passionate about what they want to study, and can demonstrate that in different areas of their life. Oxbridge is looking for someone passionate, and has good grades.
http://www.harvard-ukadmissions.co.uk/faq_and_links/
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RenéDescartes
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I read that before typing that message. 3A*/A. That could mean AAA or A*A*A* or A*A*A or A*AA. Also, it does say 39+ IB which means 39 is the minimum. Also, 28+ ACT; that's lower that the requirement for Oxford, which is 32 minimum.
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RenéDescartes
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(Original post by Royal Oak)
Out of curiosity, why would you want to do this?
2 degrees from 2 of the best unis in the world. Delicious.
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katmyster
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(Original post by Royal Oak)
:rofl: I'll keep my lower standards. As somebody who is soon to send off their application for GEM after having already done a degree, I wouldn't wish this on anyone and really wish I'd 'seen the medicine light' when I was 18.
When you say 'medicine light' what do you mean?
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katmyster
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(Original post by Royal Oak)
Out of curiosity, why would you want to do this?
I have always wanted to study abroad and have loved travelling (in particular America, i have been there 3 times) and whislt i want to do medicine by doing it this way i get the best of both worlds
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bobby147
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Does it really matter that much to you where you do your medicine degree ?
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Democracy
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You're from the UK, you're doing the right subjects, and you're predicted the right grades to get into medical school as a school leaver, but you want to try for a significantly more competitive entry route and accumulate a lot of extra debt/loss of earnings along the way. Seriously, why? This makes no financial or career sense at all :confused:

It would make far more sense to do medicine in the UK. You could always do your medical school elective abroad or complete a fellowship once you're a doctor.
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katmyster
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(Original post by Democracy)
You're from the UK, you're doing the right subjects, and you're predicted the right grades to get into medical school as a school leaver, but you want to try for a significantly more competitive entry route and accumulate a lot of extra debt/loss of earnings along the way. Seriously, why? This makes no financial or career sense at all :confused:

It would make far more sense to do medicine in the UK. You could always do your medical school elective abroad or complete a fellowship once you're a doctor.
i understand this would be a longer route and techinically i could end up with less debt because i would be completing the first four years in america on scholarship and then graduate medicine is only 4 years anyway which is less that the usual 5. I would like to do this however because i have alsways been ambitious and if this is something harder or more competive i am always up for it and the challenge it brings
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katmyster
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Yes I see what you are saying but based on house hold income I would be eligible for a full scholarship at many us institutions. I understand it is ambitious but I would like to apply as I have many successful who I know who have studied abroad and it has inspired me to do the same
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Chief Wiggum
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I don't really see the point tbh. Just seems to make things way more difficult for yourself.
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katmyster
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Well they are scholarships based on financial need and therefore these are scholarships that are equally given to us citizens and international students
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nexttime
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a) You are very unlikely to get in.
b) Even with Harvard's subsidised fees, you will still need to cover your living costs (including any flights and ~$3500 per year medical insurance - welcome to the US!) with no loans at all, is my understanding.
c) Graduate entry medicine is more competitive. This will make it much harder for you to get into medicine. Not "more of a challenge" - I mean raw chance of failure is significantly higher.
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