dab4jesus420
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I've just restarted year 12 and am currently rewriting my notes from lessons and doing some further reading into related topics but that's it aside from homework.
What does everyone else do and what do you recommend for hitting the highest grade boundaries?
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CasseroleKeith
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It very much depends on what subjects you're studying. I finished my A Levels last year with grades A*AA in English Language and Literature, French and History.

This is what I did to maximise my progress as much as poss:

History - I chose to start my notes in the beginning of year 12, and instead of relying on revision guides, made my own from an exam-board approved textbook (i.e. the big thick one you use in class). That way I was covering every aspect of the spec in detail (I obviously checked it against that just in case too!). Starting early meant I also had time to research into particular areas of interest, look into historians perspectives, etc. Once I'd developed a comprehensive revision guide, I memorised the information using Quizlet/revision cards/the cover and rewrite method: variety stops revision from becoming too stale! With regard to exam practice, exam reports were my best friend. I also found it useful to make a list of all past/specimen questions and make essay plans for my teacher to look over.

English - I started learning the literary terms early on in year 12, using the glossary provided by the exam board. I also consistently re-read the texts during bus journeys (I managed to read Frankenstein 6 times through this due to a long commute, though I could never read it again...). Past papers, exam reports, etc are key to success too. I found online resources invested in by my college (e.g. Massolit online lectures, English eMagazine articles) to be of much use too to develop critical ideas.

French - Quizlet for vocabulary and workbooks for grammar. I also used Kerboodle/textbooks to do as many practice activities as possible. Oral French can be much improved through free online pronunciation videos, and general exposure to the language as much as possible.

Always have at least one day off a week, and give yourself a nightly cut off point for work. Your sanity is key to your success, I learn in retrospect.
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dab4jesus420
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(Original post by CasseroleKeith)
It very much depends on what subjects you're studying. I finished my A Levels last year with grades A*AA in English Language and Literature, French and History.

This is what I did to maximise my progress as much as poss:

History - I chose to start my notes in the beginning of year 12, and instead of relying on revision guides, made my own from an exam-board approved textbook (i.e. the big thick one you use in class). That way I was covering every aspect of the spec in detail (I obviously checked it against that just in case too!). Starting early meant I also had time to research into particular areas of interest, look into historians perspectives, etc. Once I'd developed a comprehensive revision guide, I memorised the information using Quizlet/revision cards/the cover and rewrite method: variety stops revision from becoming too stale! With regard to exam practice, exam reports were my best friend. I also found it useful to make a list of all past/specimen questions and make essay plans for my teacher to look over.

English - I started learning the literary terms early on in year 12, using the glossary provided by the exam board. I also consistently re-read the texts during bus journeys (I managed to read Frankenstein 6 times through this due to a long commute, though I could never read it again...). Past papers, exam reports, etc are key to success too. I found online resources invested in by my college (e.g. Massolit online lectures, English eMagazine articles) to be of much use too to develop critical ideas.

French - Quizlet for vocabulary and workbooks for grammar. I also used Kerboodle/textbooks to do as many practice activities as possible. Oral French can be much improved through free online pronunciation videos, and general exposure to the language as much as possible.

Always have at least one day off a week, and give yourself a nightly cut off point for work. Your sanity is key to your success, I learn in retrospect.
Wow thanks for the indepth reply, at what point in the year did you start using quizlet for history?
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CasseroleKeith
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(Original post by dab4jesus420)
Wow thanks for the indepth reply, at what point in the year did you start using quizlet for history?
I did it throughout the duration of the course to learn those dates/names that just wouldn't stick. I found it most useful for short-term cramming in the last few weeks/days before the exam. I'd go through each set at least 3 times before the exam. Titles of sets were based on aspects of the spec and questions covered all content. I've included an example screenshot. Hope this helps!
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